2

I was satisfied with the 'rule' to accept by value when you intend to store the object, and accept by const reference when you only need to access it. This way, you (the writer of a class) doesn't choose whether to copy the user of the class's variable or whether to move it, they do. But in use I've been getting increasingly unsure about the soundness of that advice; move isn't a uniform in cost operation...

struct Thing
{
    std::array<int, 10000> m_BigArray;
};

class Doer
{
    public:
        Doer(Thing thing) : m_Thing(std::move(thing)) {}

    private:
        Thing m_Thing;
};

int main()
{
    Thing thing;
    Doer doer1(std::move(thing)); // user can decide to move 'thing'
    // or
    Doer doer2(thing); // user can decide to copy 'thing'
}

In the above example, move is as expensive as copy. So, instead of taking a const reference and copying the object once, you end up moving it (effectively copying it) twice. The user does it once into your argument, and you do it again into your member.

This gets further exacerbated even when moving is significantly cheaper than copying (pretend moving thing is some unknown cost below, but cheaper than copying):

struct A
{
    A(Thing thing) : m_Thing(std::move(thing)) {}
    Thing m_Thing;
};

struct B : A
{
    B(Thing thing) : A(std::move(thing)) {}
};

struct C : B
{
    C(Thing thing) : B(std::move(thing)) {}
};

struct D : C
{
    D(Thing thing) : C(std::move(thing)) {}
};

Here, you have will either end up with 1 copy and 4 moves, or 5 moves. If all the constructors accepted a const reference it would only be 1 copy. Now I have to weigh what's move expensive, 1 copy or 5 moves.

What's the best advice for handling these situations?

4

What's the best advice for handling these situations?

My best advice is to do what you're doing: Think for yourself. Don't trust everything you hear. Measure.

Below I've taken your code and instrumented it with print statements. I've also added a 3rd case: Initializing from a prvalue:

The test tries things two ways:

  1. Pass by value.
  2. Overload on passing by const& and &&:

Code:

#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

struct Thing
{
    Thing() = default;
    Thing(const Thing&) {std::cout << "Thing(const Thing&)\n";}
    Thing& operator=(const Thing&) {std::cout << "operator=(const Thing&)\n";
                                    return *this;}
    Thing(Thing&&) {std::cout << "Thing(Thing&&)\n";}
    Thing& operator=(Thing&&) {std::cout << "operator=(Thing&&)\n";
                                    return *this;}
};

class Doer
{
    public:
#if PROCESS == 1
        Doer(Thing thing) : m_Thing(std::move(thing)) {}
#elif PROCESS == 2
        Doer(const Thing& thing) : m_Thing(thing) {}
        Doer(Thing&& thing) : m_Thing(std::move(thing)) {}
#endif

    private:
        Thing m_Thing;
};

Thing
make_thing()
{
    return Thing();
}

int main()
{
    Thing thing;
    std::cout << "lvalue\n";
    Doer doer1(thing); // user can decide to copy 'thing'
    std::cout << "\nxvalue\n";
    Doer doer2(std::move(thing)); // user can decide to move 'thing'
    std::cout << "\nprvalue\n";
    Doer doer3(make_thing()); // user can decide to use factor function
}

For me when I compile with -DPROCESS=1 I get:

lvalue
Thing(const Thing&)
Thing(Thing&&)

xvalue
Thing(Thing&&)
Thing(Thing&&)

prvalue
Thing(Thing&&)

And with -DPROCESS=2:

lvalue
Thing(const Thing&)

xvalue
Thing(Thing&&)

prvalue
Thing(Thing&&)

So passing by value costs an extra move construction over passing by overloaded references for the lvalue and xvalue cases. And as you've noted, a move construction isn't necessarily cheap. It can be as expensive as a copy construction. On the upside, you only have to write 1 overload with pass-by-value. Passing by overloaded references requires 2^N overloads where N is the number of parameters. Quite doable at N==1, getting unwieldy at N==3.

Also as you noted your second example is just your first exacerbated.

When performance is your primary concern, and especially when you can't count on a cheap move constructor, pass by overloaded rvalue references. When you can count on a cheap move construction, and/or you do not want to deal with an unreasonable (you get to define unreasonable for yourself) number of overloads, use pass-by-value. There is no one answer that is always right for everyone in every situation. C++11 programmers still have to think.

1

You didn't include it as a choice, but may I suggest perfect forwarding?

class Doer
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    Doer(T&& thing) : m_Thing(std::forward<T>(thing)) {}

private:
    Thing m_Thing;
};

This will result in a single copy/move for lvalues/rvalues, which is exactly what we want.

3
  • I thought about including this in my answer and decided not to because of the extra complexity. This can be used to get the same expense as overloading with references. However you really don't want to do it in an overly generic fashion as currently shown. When T is unconstrained, traits such as std::is_constructible<Doer, X> give a false positive. To prevent this you need to constrain T to be a Thing and this typically adds more complexity than just adding a single overload. This technique becomes more attractive when you need it to avoid an unreasonable number of overloads. – Howard Hinnant Feb 17 '13 at 18:22
  • std::tuple is a wonderful place to use this technique! (as long as it is properly constrained). – Howard Hinnant Feb 17 '13 at 18:23
  • @HowardHinnant By constraining, I suspect you mean std::enable_if? – fredoverflow Feb 17 '13 at 19:49
1

Often cited Want Speed? Pass by Value. gives this question a detailed treatment:

... although the compiler is normally required to make a copy when a function parameter is passed by value (so modifications to the parameter inside the function can’t affect the caller), it is allowed to elide the copy, and simply use the source object itself, when the source is an rvalue.

3
  • Should be a comment unless you're going to quote the relevant passages from the linked text,. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 13:34
  • 2
    This answer is incorrect. The compiler will not implicitly move in any of the places move is used in the question. I have not yet down voted. Giving you a chance to delete or correct it. – Howard Hinnant Feb 17 '13 at 16:53
  • @HowardHinnant you are right, the last part was my wishful thinking. – Maxim Egorushkin Feb 17 '13 at 21:21
0

Partial answer only, but in the second example you gave, the moves could have been avoided by explicitly inheriting A's base ctor:

struct B : A
{
    using A::A;
};

struct C : B
{
    using A::A;
};

struct D : C
{
    using A::A;
};

Here'll you end up with 1 copy vs 1 move.

-6

Here's some additional rules that will fix the problem:

  1. Never derive from a concrete class. A concrete, instantiable class is already completely implemented. Deriving from it is bad use of inheritance. => your constructor parameter cost disappears.
  2. Decide between pass-by-value and pass-by-const-reference in data members based on whether the data is inside or outside your current object.
  3. If there are constructor parameters in a class, there should also be a data member in the same class. Passing the parameter to a base class is not a good idea.
  4. Forget std::move. The cost of copying the data is not large enough. It takes more time for programmers to type std::move everywhere than the practise saves in execution time.
  5. If you're constantly creating and destroying those objects, that takes more time than whatever you are saving with std::move.
15
  • 1
    Dude. That's so wrong it's funny. We can understand you can't use std::move, but don't spread this nonsense. – Bartek Banachewicz Feb 17 '13 at 13:24
  • 2
    Passing the parameter to a base class is not a good idea WTF? – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 13:34
  • for programmers to type std::move everywhere Why are you typing std::move everywhere? – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 13:36
  • lightness: see the examples. std::move used 6 times in small example. – tp1 Feb 17 '13 at 13:37
  • @tp1: It's a contrived example, buddy. That hardly counts as every programmer using it "everywhere". – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 17 '13 at 14:03

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