-4

I was just browsing some coding stuff and noticed this code:

int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
  ifstream file;
  string lineBuffer;
  file.open(argv[1]) ;  
  while (!file.eof()) 
  {
     getline(file, lineBuffer);
     if (lineBuffer.length() == 0)
       continue; //ignore all empty lines
     else 
     {
        //do your code here
     }
  }
  return 0;
}

I have searched for the concept of a lineBuffer all over the net but found no relevant answer. Can anyone help me to understand how lineBuffer is used to read a file line by line?

  • 1
    The code snippet you posted does read lines sequentially from a file, so you answered your own question. – Chris Hayden Feb 17 '13 at 21:46
  • lineBuffer is just a string. Isn't it getline that you need to stufy? – David Heffernan Feb 17 '13 at 21:46
  • thanks david i got this much by looking at code bt not actuly gtng how to get throug i mens wit lineBufeer normal console are not working – prateeak ojha Feb 17 '13 at 21:52
  • Don;t do this while (!file.eof()) – Martin York Feb 17 '13 at 23:22
2
string lineBuffer;

This is a variable called lineBuffer. It's not a concept to be understood and it doesn't read files, it's just a string with a name, it could just as easily have been called:

string fred;

but because it is used as a buffer to hold each line of text, it is more sensible and helpful to call it lineBuffer.

Wherever you found that code, stop reading it, the code is broken and written by someone who doesn't know C++ very well. This part is broken:

while (!file.eof()) 
{
   getline(file, lineBuffer);

It should be done like this instead:

while (getline(file, lineBuffer))
{
| improve this answer | |
  • I'd rather say that reading from file is done in inappropriate way than calling this code "broken". – LihO Feb 17 '13 at 22:11
  • And I'd rather say using while (!file.eof() is broken and it must stop – Jonathan Wakely Feb 17 '13 at 22:18
  • @LihO It's broken, in the sense that the code doesn't work (at least for any reasonable definition of work). – James Kanze Feb 17 '13 at 23:02
  • Well, I agree with this answer, I just found it a bit odd and disrespectful to author of that code, whoever it was. – LihO Feb 17 '13 at 23:16
  • If code is broken and obviously not tested properly then it doesn't deserve respect. I could have been far more disrespectful than saying "doesn't know C++ very well" – Jonathan Wakely Feb 18 '13 at 9:11
0

The lineBuffer is a string where you are asking C++ to put the line it reads. Once the line is in that string, they check whether there was any content in that line, and if not, skip processing it.

| improve this answer | |

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