1

I'm currently working on a a project and I have a need to queue some jobs for processing, here's the requirement:

  1. Jobs must be processed one at a time
  2. A queued item must be able to be waited on

So I want something akin to:

Task<result> QueueJob(params here)
{
   /// Queue the job and somehow return a waitable task that will wait until the queued job has been executed and return the result.
}

I've tried having a background running task that just pulls items off a queue and processes the job, but the difficulty is getting from a background task to the method.

If need be I could go the route of just requesting a completion callback in the QueueJob method, but it'd be great if I could get a transparent Task back that allows you to wait on the job to be processed (even if there are jobs before it in the queue).

  • Can you use .Net 4.5? – svick Feb 18 '13 at 9:27
0

Func<T> takes no parameters and returns a value of type T. The jobs are run one by one and you can wait on the returned task to get the result.

public class TaskQueue
{
    private Queue<Task> InnerTaskQueue;

    private bool IsJobRunning;

    public void Start()
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            while (true)
            {
                if (InnerTaskQueue.Count > 0 && !IsJobRunning)
                {
                     var task = InnerTaskQueue.Dequeue()
                     task.Start();
                     IsJobRunning = true;
                     task.ContinueWith(t => IsJobRunning = false);
                }
                else
                {
                     Thread.Sleep(1000);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public Task<T> QueueJob(Func<T> job)
    {
        var task = new Task<T>(() => job());
        InnerTaskQueue.Enqueue(task);
        return task;
    }
}
  • While this didn't solve my particular problem entirely, it's a great skeleton for what I did and solves the problem in a good generic fashion, so I'm going to mark it as the answer. Thanks! – Clint Feb 18 '13 at 5:42
  • 1
    As far as the sleep, this is a single thread on the thread pool so we are not suspending a whole thread, the thread pool is smart enough to make optimizations and schedule appropriately. At this point it just sounds like nit-picking...Stack Overflow is about giving guidence where people need help which in this case it sounds like I was able to point him in the right direction. Of course if performance is tight he will make optimizations where needed but none of that changes the actual solution of how to queue delegates, etc. which is what this question is about. – Despertar Feb 18 '13 at 10:13
  • 2
    “A single thread with a while loop dequeing items one at a time is thread safe.” But a single thread dequeuing items and another thread enqueueing them isn't. (BTW, since you didn't @-notify me, I didn't know you replied to me, that's why I'm replying this late.) – svick Feb 20 '13 at 21:16
  • 1
    “so we are not suspending a whole thread” Except you are. If you block a thread waiting, that thread can't be used for anything else. The fact that it's a ThreadPool thread doesn't change anything about that. And I really do think that SO answers should promote good practices, not just something that works. (Although your code doesn't even do that.) – svick Feb 20 '13 at 21:22
  • 2
    A community flourishes when people collaborate together to help each other instead of trying to step on each others throats to show who's 'more right'. You have some good suggestions so thank you for your input and happy coding :) – Despertar Feb 21 '13 at 9:37
5

You might find TaskCompletionSource<T> useful, it can be used to create a Task that completes exactly when you want it to. If you combine it with BlockingCollection<T>, you will get your queue:

class JobProcessor<TInput, TOutput> : IDisposable
{
    private readonly Func<TInput, TOutput> m_transform;

    // or a custom type instead of Tuple
    private readonly
        BlockingCollection<Tuple<TInput, TaskCompletionSource<TOutput>>>
        m_queue =
        new BlockingCollection<Tuple<TInput, TaskCompletionSource<TOutput>>>();

    public JobProcessor(Func<TInput, TOutput> transform)
    {
        m_transform = transform;
        Task.Factory.StartNew(ProcessQueue, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    }

    private void ProcessQueue()
    {
        Tuple<TInput, TaskCompletionSource<TOutput>> tuple;
        while (m_queue.TryTake(out tuple, Timeout.Infinite))
        {
            var input = tuple.Item1;
            var tcs = tuple.Item2;

            try
            {
                tcs.SetResult(m_transform(input));
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                tcs.SetException(ex);
            }
        }
    }

    public Task<TOutput> QueueJob(TInput input)
    {
        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<TOutput>();
        m_queue.Add(Tuple.Create(input, tcs));
        return tcs.Task;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        m_queue.CompleteAdding();
    }
}
  • Upvote for something I'd not seen before! This may prove useful, for now I've got a solution working. – Clint Feb 18 '13 at 9:46
2

I would go for something like this:

class TaskProcessor<TResult>
{
    // TODO: Error handling!

    readonly BlockingCollection<Task<TResult>> blockingCollection = new BlockingCollection<Task<TResult>>(new ConcurrentQueue<Task<TResult>>());

    public Task<TResult> AddTask(Func<TResult> work)
    {
        var task = new Task<TResult>(work);
        blockingCollection.Add(task);
        return task; // give the task back to the caller so they can wait on it
    }

    public void CompleteAddingTasks()
    {
        blockingCollection.CompleteAdding();
    }

    public TaskProcessor()
    {
        ProcessQueue();
    }

    void ProcessQueue()
    {
        Task<TResult> task;
        while (blockingCollection.TryTake(out task))
        {
            task.Start();
            task.Wait(); // ensure this task finishes before we start a new one...
        }
    }
}

Depending on the type of app that is using it, you could switch out the BlockingCollection/ConcurrentQueue for something simpler (eg just a plain queue). You can also adjust the signature of the "AddTask" method depending on what sort of methods/parameters you will be queueing up...

  • A more efficient way would be use task.RunSynchronously(). – svick Feb 18 '13 at 9:25
  • Also, your code won't work, because this overload of TryTake() returns false immediately if the collection is empty. You need to use an overload that allows you to specify a timeout and set that to infinity. – svick Feb 18 '13 at 9:30
  • One more thing: you're starting ProcessQueue() directly from the constructor. If ProcessQueue() worked correctly, the constructor would never return. – svick Feb 18 '13 at 9:32
  • @svick all good points, I dashed this out quickly going mostly from memory, which I guess I should have mentioned in the post. (And I've been sick for the last two days, which has kept me away from SO...) – Jon Feb 20 '13 at 21:04

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