3

I've got a script that's chewing through a lot of objects, and sometimes I want to kill it in the middle of the run because I see something going south. Unfortunately, I'm writing to a log file using System.IO.StreamWriter, and whenever I send a Ctrl-C, my log files are stuck open.

Is there any way I can define some kind of handler or exiting function that allows me to gracefully close filehandles and connections that I have open?

4

Might try using Try/Catch/Finally, putting your close() commands in the Finally block.

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    I'm doing that in several parts of the program for various things, but it's more like I need something like the equivalent of "trap control_c SIGINT" from Bash. Although I guess I could put the entire script in a giant try{} statement and throw a finally{}. Can you nest try statements? This just seems like the wrong way. – Matt Simmons Feb 18 '13 at 15:59
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    Yes, you can nest Try statements. – mjolinor Feb 18 '13 at 16:16
2

With PowerShell 2.0 and up, you can define a Trap which will fire when a terminating error occurs. You can define multiple traps to capture different exceptions. This could result in much cleaner code than try/catch littered everywhere, or wrapping the entire script in one big try/catch.

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    Sadly, it doesn't look like I can trap Ctrl-C (whatever that appears as, to the script itself). At least, I haven't figured out how to do it yet. – Matt Simmons Feb 18 '13 at 19:40
1

To terminate a script, use exit .If an exception is thrown, use try/catch/finally with close() commands in finally. If it's just an if-test, try something like this:

function Close-Script {
    #If stream1 is created
    if($stream1) { 
        $stream1.Close()
    }

    #Terminate script
    exit
}

$stream1 = New-Object System.IO.StreamWriter filename.txt


If(a test that detects your error) {
    Close-Script
}

If the amounts of streamwriters varies from time to time, you can collect them to an array and close them. Ex:

function Close-Script {
    #Close streams
    $writers | % { $_.Close() }

    #Terminate script
    exit
}

$writers = @()
$stream1 = New-Object System.IO.StreamWriter filename.txt
$writers += $stream1
$stream2 = New-Object System.IO.StreamWriter filename2.txt
$writers += $stream2

If(a test that detects your error) {
    Close-Script
}
  • Thanks. It's less that there are actual errors that an If statement would catch. It's more like I'm watching debugging output and say, "oh, that's wrong, I've got to fix it", but I can't kill it until it's finished the loop of 150+ entities. – Matt Simmons Feb 18 '13 at 16:00
  • if you want a cleanup function after you use ctrl+c, you could use the function as I provided, but you would need to make the vars in the global scope(e.g. $global:writers), OR dot-source when running the script (. .\myscript.ps1), then calling Close-Script after ctrl+c – Frode F. Feb 18 '13 at 16:14

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