80

If I want to find the sum of the digits of a number, i.e.:

  • Input: 932
  • Output: 14, which is (9 + 3 + 2)

What is the fastest way of doing this?

I instinctively did:

sum(int(digit) for digit in str(number))

and I found this online:

sum(map(int, str(number)))

Which is best to use for speed, and are there any other methods which are even faster?

18 Answers 18

114

Both lines you posted are fine, but you can do it purely in integers, and it will be the most efficient:

def sum_digits(n):
    s = 0
    while n:
        s += n % 10
        n //= 10
    return s

or with divmod:

def sum_digits2(n):
    s = 0
    while n:
        n, remainder = divmod(n, 10)
        s += remainder
    return s

Even faster is the version without augmented assignments:

def sum_digits3(n):
   r = 0
   while n:
       r, n = r + n % 10, n // 10
   return r

> %timeit sum_digits(n)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 574 ns per loop

> %timeit sum_digits2(n)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 716 ns per loop

> %timeit sum_digits3(n)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 479 ns per loop

> %timeit sum(map(int, str(n)))
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.42 us per loop

> %timeit sum([int(digit) for digit in str(n)])
100000 loops, best of 3: 1.52 us per loop

> %timeit sum(int(digit) for digit in str(n))
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.04 us per loop
  • 3
    sum_digits3() should probably use // instead of /, right? Otherwise I get wrong answers. – LarsH Jul 29 '14 at 6:17
  • May I need an explanation here on "while n:"? I do not know how Python understand when to stop. For example, sum of digits of 324 should be 3+2+4. For the last (the front digit three), in the while loop, 3/10=0 and then it becomes "while 0:". So, does while 0 means False to the loop and then escape the loop and return s? – nam Aug 18 '14 at 4:11
  • 3
    Yep, some things are equivalent to False in places that expect boolean values. See here: docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#truth-value-testing – Pavel Anossov Aug 18 '14 at 11:37
  • 1
    Is there way to find the sum of digits of odd sequence of integers by a formula? – Anoop Toffy Apr 9 '16 at 14:37
  • 5
    What's the value of n in your %timeit calls? – d8aninja Sep 27 '16 at 21:35
15

If you want to keep summing the digits until you get a single-digit number (one of my favorite characteristics of numbers divisible by 9) you can do:

def digital_root(n):
    x = sum(int(digit) for digit in str(n))
    if x < 10:
        return x
    else:
        return digital_root(x)

Which actually turns out to be pretty fast itself...

%timeit digital_root(12312658419614961365)

10000 loops, best of 3: 22.6 µs per loop
  • 1
    Clever, folding the function within itself! – vashts85 Nov 8 '16 at 18:24
  • recursion! @vashts85 – d8aninja Nov 15 '16 at 18:30
  • Me too, what is it with divisible by 9? – Ronaldo Nascimento Jun 16 '17 at 11:36
  • @RonaldoNascimento I dunno but it fascinates me. And 3s. – d8aninja Jul 3 '17 at 21:46
  • 1
    For the digital root (of base 10 numbers), there exists a direct formula: digital_root(n) = n-9*(n-1//9) – reschu Jun 26 '18 at 12:26
7

This might help

def digit_sum(n):
    num_str = str(n)
    sum = 0
    for i in range(0, len(num_str)):
        sum += int(num_str[i])
    return sum
  • 1
    thanks, this one helped me in the problem: examine if the given number can give modulo 0 after you sum up its digits. – Yannis Dran Nov 25 '16 at 22:55
4

Doing some Codecademy challenges I resolved this like:

def digit_sum(n):
arr = []
nstr = str(n)
for x in nstr:
    arr.append(int(x))
return sum(arr)
2

Found this on one of the problem solving challenge websites. Not mine, but it works.

num = 0            # replace 0 with whatever number you want to sum up
print(sum([int(k) for k in str(num)]))
1

Here is a solution without any loop or recursion but works for non-negative integers only (Python3):

def sum_digits(n):
    if n > 0:
        s = (n-1) // 9    
        return n-9*s
    return 0
1

The best way is to use math.
I knew this from school.(kinda also from codewars)

def digital_sum(num):
    return (num % 9) or num and 9

Just don't know how this works in code, but I know it's maths

If a number is divisible by 9 then, it's digital_sum will be 9,
if that's not the case then num % 9 will be the digital sum.

0
def digitsum(n):
    result = 0
    for i in range(len(str(n))):
        result = result + int(str(n)[i:i+1])
    return(result)

"result" is initialized with 0.

Inside the for loop, the number(n) is converted into a string to be split with loop index(i) and get each digit. ---> str(n)[i:i+1]

This sliced digit is converted back to an integer ----> int(str(n)[i:i+1])

And hence added to result.

  • 2
    Please add a few words to explain your code and how it addresses the question. – Yannis Dec 22 '17 at 21:25
0
def sumOfDigits():

    n=int(input("enter digit:")) 
    sum=0
    while n!=0 :

        m=n%10
        n=n/10
        sum=int(sum+m)

    print(sum)

sumOfDigits()
  • 5
    Hello! Welcome to the site! While your answer appears to be a valid solution to the problem, it doesn't acswer the question itself: "Which is faster?" Given that this is a question of speed, can you show test results of your solution versus the examples given? – Kind Stranger Sep 21 '18 at 17:58
0

you can also try this with built_in_function called divmod() ;

number = int(input('enter any integer: = '))
sum = 0
while number!=0: 
    take = divmod(number, 10) 
    dig = take[1] 
    sum += dig 
    number = take[0] 
print(sum) 

you can take any number of digit

0
reduce(op.add,map(int,list(str(number))))

Test:

from datetime import datetime
number=49263985629356279356927356923569976549123548126856926293658923658923658923658972365297865987236523786598236592386592386589236592365293865923876592385623987659238756239875692387659238756239875692856239856238563286598237592875498259826592356923659283756982375692835692385653418923564912354687123548712354827354827354823548723548235482735482354827354823548235482354823548235482735482735482735482354823548235489235648293548235492185348235481235482354823548235482354823548235482354823548234



startTime = datetime.now()

for _ in  range(0,100000) :
    out=reduce(op.add,map(int,list(str(number))))

now=datetime.now()
runningTime=(now - startTime)

print ("Running time:%s" % runningTime)
print(out)

Running time:0:00:13.122560 2462

0

Try this

    print(sum(list(map(int,input("Enter your number ")))))
0

I cam up with a recursive solution:

def sumDigits(num):
#   print "evaluating:", num
  if num < 10:
    return num

  # solution 1
#   res = num/10
#   rem = num%10
#   print "res:", res, "rem:", rem
#   return sumDigits(res+rem)

    # solution 2
  arr = [int(i) for i in str(num)]
  return sumDigits(sum(arr))

# print(sumDigits(1))
# print(sumDigits(49))
print(sumDigits(439230))
# print(sumDigits(439237))
0

A base 10 number can be expressed as a series of the form

a × 10^p + b × 10^p-1 .. z × 10^0

so the sum of a number's digits is the sum of the coefficients of the terms.

Based on this information, the sum of the digits can be computed like this:

import math

def add_digits(n):
    # Assume n >= 0, else we should take abs(n)
    if 0 <= n < 10:
        return n
    r = 0
    ndigits = int(math.log10(n))
    for p in range(ndigits, -1, -1):
        d, n = divmod(n, 10 ** p)
        r += d
    return r

This is effectively the reverse of the continuous division by 10 in the accepted answer. Given the extra computation in this function compared to the accepted answer, it's not surprising to find that this approach performs poorly in comparison: it's about 3.5 times slower, and about twice as slow as

sum(int(x) for x in str(n))
-1
num = 123
dig = 0
sum = 0
while(num > 0):
  dig = int(num%10)
  sum = sum+dig
  num = num/10

print(sum) // make sure to add space above this line

  • num isn't less than 0. Nothing will happen. Make that a greater-than and this can work. – sorak Feb 27 '18 at 22:11
  • yeah..by mistake it was less than. now it greater than and works fine – Jayant Pandey Mar 5 '18 at 12:46
-1

You can try this

def sumDigits(number):
    sum = 0
    while(number>0):
        lastdigit = number%10
        sum += lastdigit
        number = number//10

    return sum
-3

It only works for three-digit numbers, but it works

a = int(input())
print(a // 100 + a // 10 % 10 + a % 10)
-5
n = str(input("Enter the number\n"))

list1 = []

for each_number in n:

        list1.append(int(each_number))

print(sum(list1))
  • 1
    Please use the edit link to explain how this code works and don't just give the code, as an explanation is more likely to help future readers. See also How to Answer. source – Jed Fox Jun 9 '17 at 14:56
  • This does not answer the question. – All Workers Are Essential Jun 9 '17 at 17:24

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