96

Is there a way to replace all occurrences of a substring with another string in std::string?

For instance:

void SomeFunction(std::string& str)
{
   str = str.replace("hello", "world"); //< I'm looking for something nice like this
}
1
76

Why not implement your own replace?

void myReplace(std::string& str,
               const std::string& oldStr,
               const std::string& newStr)
{
  std::string::size_type pos = 0u;
  while((pos = str.find(oldStr, pos)) != std::string::npos){
     str.replace(pos, oldStr.length(), newStr);
     pos += newStr.length();
  }
}
4
  • 3
    You are messing a bit with memory here with all the calls to "replace" : complexity would be n² if you remove "o" from "ooooooo...o". I guess one can do better, but this solution has the merit of being easy to understand. – Zonko Sep 21 '11 at 8:57
  • 1
    Why is this not an actual for loop, rather than an obfuscated for loop? – Shirik Aug 21 '12 at 18:44
  • I am used to apply the 'least surprise' principle. For loops are for simple index increment use, most of time. Here, according to me, a while loop is clearer. – yves Baumes Aug 23 '12 at 19:16
  • 1
    @aldo As a general rule it is better to avoid complexity and, for instance, use regex as mentioned in other replies. But depending on your need you may want to control your project dependencies. A little code snippet that does what exactly you need, no more, is sometimes better. – yves Baumes Oct 27 '12 at 10:57
160
#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp> // include Boost, a C++ library
...
std::string target("Would you like a foo of chocolate. Two foos of chocolate?");
boost::replace_all(target, "foo", "bar");

Here is the official documentation on replace_all.

5
  • 1
    Note that you don't have to explicitly create std::string's for the pattern and replacement: boost::replace_all(target, "foo", "bar"); – Alexis Wilke Sep 10 '11 at 23:55
  • 4
    +1, with a caveat: replace_all will segfault for versions of boost > 1.43 on Sun Studio for any version < 12.3 – Brian Vandenberg Aug 23 '12 at 21:44
  • 3
    boost increases compile time considerably on embedded devices. Even ARMv7 quad core. 100 lines of code compile in 2 minutes, without boost, 2 seconds. – Piotr Kula Jun 9 '15 at 20:07
  • 4
    @ppumkin : that means your compiler (or build setup, or whatever) sucks, not the target architecture, which has nothing to do with it. – Daniel Kamil Kozar Jul 21 '16 at 13:54
  • If your compiler supports pre-compiled header it is highly recommended to use it when using boost. It really saves time. – Alan Milton Nov 15 '18 at 15:54
38

In C++11, you can do this as a one-liner with a call to regex_replace:

#include <string>
#include <regex>

using std::string;

string do_replace( string const & in, string const & from, string const & to )
{
  return std::regex_replace( in, std::regex(from), to );
}

string test = "Remove all spaces";
std::cout << do_replace(test, " ", "") << std::endl;

output:

Removeallspaces
6
  • Thanks, very easy to use and remember! – Julian Declercq Jun 23 '16 at 10:29
  • Notice also that from can be a regular expression -- so you can use more sophisticated matching criteria if you need to. What I don't see, is how to do this without applying some form of regular expression parsing -- instead using only a direct interpretation of the from characters. – Brent Bradburn Jun 23 '16 at 14:36
  • This may require an up-to-date compiler. It worked with gcc 5.0, but I had some troubles with gcc 4.8.4. – Brent Bradburn Jun 24 '16 at 15:38
  • @nobar, yeah, if I remember properly the regex support in 4.8.x was not complete. Also you can have more sophisticated searches, but you get penalized time wise... It's going to be slower than the other more straight forward search and replace functions. – Alexis Wilke Aug 7 '16 at 5:17
  • 2
    Please note that this will work only for very basic alphanumeric characters and nothing else without doing a lot of preprocessing depending on the type of string. I haven't found a general purpose regex based string replace yet. – Piyush Soni Oct 21 '16 at 9:05
17

Why not return a modified string?

std::string ReplaceString(std::string subject, const std::string& search,
                          const std::string& replace) {
    size_t pos = 0;
    while((pos = subject.find(search, pos)) != std::string::npos) {
         subject.replace(pos, search.length(), replace);
         pos += replace.length();
    }
    return subject;
}

If you need performance, here is an optimized function that modifies the input string, it does not create a copy of the string:

void ReplaceStringInPlace(std::string& subject, const std::string& search,
                          const std::string& replace) {
    size_t pos = 0;
    while((pos = subject.find(search, pos)) != std::string::npos) {
         subject.replace(pos, search.length(), replace);
         pos += replace.length();
    }
}

Tests:

std::string input = "abc abc def";
std::cout << "Input string: " << input << std::endl;

std::cout << "ReplaceString() return value: " 
          << ReplaceString(input, "bc", "!!") << std::endl;
std::cout << "ReplaceString() input string not changed: " 
          << input << std::endl;

ReplaceStringInPlace(input, "bc", "??");
std::cout << "ReplaceStringInPlace() input string modified: " 
          << input << std::endl;

Output:

Input string: abc abc def
ReplaceString() return value: a!! a!! def
ReplaceString() input string not modified: abc abc def
ReplaceStringInPlace() input string modified: a?? a?? def
0
6

My templatized inline in-place find-and-replace:

template<class T>
int inline findAndReplace(T& source, const T& find, const T& replace)
{
    int num=0;
    typename T::size_t fLen = find.size();
    typename T::size_t rLen = replace.size();
    for (T::size_t pos=0; (pos=source.find(find, pos))!=T::npos; pos+=rLen)
    {
        num++;
        source.replace(pos, fLen, replace);
    }
    return num;
}

It returns a count of the number of items substituted (for use if you want to successively run this, etc). To use it:

std::string str = "one two three";
int n = findAndReplace(str, "one", "1");
1
  • 4
    I tried this sample under GCC but it wouldn't compile - it didn't like the use of T::size_t. Replacing T::size_t with typename T::size_type fixes the problem. – Andrew Wyatt Jul 12 '11 at 13:29
3

The easiest way (offering something near what you wrote) is to use Boost.Regex, specifically regex_replace.

std::string has built in find() and replace() methods, but they are more cumbersome to work with as they require dealing with indices and string lengths.

1
  • 3
    There are also the boost string algorithms, including replace_all (regex might be a bit heavy-weight for such simple substitution). – UncleBens Sep 29 '09 at 20:13
3

I believe this would work. It takes const char*'s as a parameter.

//params find and replace cannot be NULL
void FindAndReplace( std::string& source, const char* find, const char* replace )
{
   //ASSERT(find != NULL);
   //ASSERT(replace != NULL);
   size_t findLen = strlen(find);
   size_t replaceLen = strlen(replace);
   size_t pos = 0;

   //search for the next occurrence of find within source
   while ((pos = source.find(find, pos)) != std::string::npos)
   {
      //replace the found string with the replacement
      source.replace( pos, findLen, replace );

      //the next line keeps you from searching your replace string, 
      //so your could replace "hello" with "hello world" 
      //and not have it blow chunks.
      pos += replaceLen; 
   }
}
7
  • Given that size_type for a string is unsigned, your >= check in the loop condition will always be true. You have to use std::string::npos there. – Pavel Minaev Sep 29 '09 at 19:28
  • size_type is not unsigned. It's unsigned on many platforms, but not all. – Alan Sep 29 '09 at 19:32
  • 13
    Why in the world is this not part of std::string? Is there any other serious String class in the world of programming that does not offer a 'find and replace' operation? Surely it's more common than having two iterators and wanting to replace the text between them?? Sometimes std::string feels like a car with a tunable spectrum windshield but no way to roll down the driver's window. – Spike0xff Nov 2 '09 at 17:08
  • 1
    @Spike0xff boost has roll_down_window – ta.speot.is Sep 7 '12 at 1:28
  • 1
    @gustafr: My mistake. I've worked on systems where older compilers defined size_t improperly. – Alan Jan 6 '13 at 17:33
3
#include <string>

using std::string;

void myReplace(string& str,
               const string& oldStr,
               const string& newStr) {
  if (oldStr.empty()) {
    return;
  }

  for (size_t pos = 0; (pos = str.find(oldStr, pos)) != string::npos;) {
    str.replace(pos, oldStr.length(), newStr);
    pos += newStr.length();
  }
}

The check for oldStr being empty is important. If for whatever reason that parameter is empty you will get stuck in an infinite loop.

But yeah use the tried and tested C++11 or Boost solution if you can.

1
  • This was really handy for fixing up some debugging info as I just pasted this into an existing file without any dependencies... thanks! – Tom Swirly Feb 22 at 16:59
1
// Replace all occurrences of searchStr in str with replacer
// Each match is replaced only once to prevent an infinite loop
// The algorithm iterates once over the input and only concatenates 
// to the output, so it should be reasonably efficient
std::string replace(const std::string& str, const std::string& searchStr, 
    const std::string& replacer)
{
    // Prevent an infinite loop if the input is empty
    if (searchStr == "") {
        return str;
    }

    std::string result = "";
    size_t pos = 0;
    size_t pos2 = str.find(searchStr, pos);

    while (pos2 != std::string::npos) {
        result += str.substr(pos, pos2-pos) + replacer;
        pos = pos2 + searchStr.length();
        pos2 = str.find(searchStr, pos);
    }

    result += str.substr(pos, str.length()-pos);
    return result;
}
1
  • 1
    We only need to search for new matches from the last match, that's why the algorithm carefully tracks the last match in pos. pos2 always stores the next match, so we concatenate the string between pos and pos2 to the result, then advance pos and pos2. If no other match can be found, we concatenate the remainder of the string to result. – Björn Ganster Sep 21 '17 at 8:23

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