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Suppose I have multiple threads blocking on a call to pthread_mutex_lock(). When the mutex becomes available, does the first thread that called pthread_mutex_lock() get the lock? That is, are calls to pthread_mutex_lock() in FIFO order? If not, what, if any, order are they in? Thanks!

3 Answers 3

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When the mutex becomes available, does the first thread that called pthread_mutex_lock() get the lock?

No. One of the waiting threads gets a lock, but which one gets it is not determined.

FIFO order?

FIFO mutex is rather a pattern already. See Implementing a FIFO mutex in pthreads

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  • By FIFO I just meant is the first thread to call pthread_mutex_lock the first to get the lock when it's available and so on for subsequent threads. Guess I'm implementing my own. Thank you.
    – shanet
    Commented Feb 18, 2013 at 23:33
  • @shanet: "I just meant is the first thread to call pthread_mutex_lock the first to get the lock when it's available" - yes, that's exactly what FIFO mutex is about.
    – LihO
    Commented Feb 18, 2013 at 23:36
  • How about std::mutex?
    – Zhang
    Commented Mar 6, 2023 at 13:05
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"If there are threads blocked on the mutex object referenced by mutex when pthread_mutex_unlock() is called, resulting in the mutex becoming available, the scheduling policy shall determine which thread shall acquire the mutex."

Aside from that, the answer to your question isn't specified by the POSIX standard. It may be random, or it may be in FIFO or LIFO or any other order, according to the choices made by the implementation.

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FIFO ordering is about the least efficient mutex wake order possible. Only a truly awful implementation would use it. The thread that ran the most recently may be able to run again without a context switch and the more recently a thread ran, more of its data and code will be hot in the cache. Reasonable implementations try to give the mutex to the thread that held it the most recently most of the time.

Consider two threads that do this:

  1. Acquire a mutex.
  2. Adjust some data.
  3. Release the mutex.
  4. Go to step 1.

Now imagine two threads running this code on a single core CPU. It should be clear that FIFO mutex behavior would result in one "adjust some data" per context switch -- the worst possible outcome.

Of course, reasonable implementations generally do give some nod to fairness. We don't want one thread to make no forward progress. But that hardly justifies a FIFO implementation!

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  • Your idea of "reasonable" is not compatible with most. In particular it's not compatible with realtime requirements; a single thread that rapidly locks and unlocks the mutex will prevent forward progress in any other thread. FIFO order within each priority level is the normal way mutexes should behave for robust realtime usage. Commented Feb 18, 2013 at 23:37
  • @R.. POSIX mutexes are not, and are not intended to be, realtime. They are intended to maximize the forward progress of the process as a whole without being manifestly unfair. Commented Feb 18, 2013 at 23:38
  • Per POSIX, "The pthread_mutex_unlock() function shall release the mutex object referenced by mutex. The manner in which a mutex is released is dependent upon the mutex's type attribute. If there are threads blocked on the mutex object referenced by mutex when pthread_mutex_unlock() is called, resulting in the mutex becoming available, the scheduling policy shall determine which thread shall acquire the mutex." (emphasis mine) Commented Feb 19, 2013 at 2:08
  • BTW, I hardly think you can say POSIX mutexes are not intended to be realtime, when they have priority inheritance protocol and priority ceiling, features designed specifically for realtime use. Commented Feb 19, 2013 at 2:11
  • @R..: I'm talking about default mutexes, which I assume is what the OP is asking about. Commented Feb 19, 2013 at 16:21

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