8

I need something similar to ReadToEnd or ReadAllBytes to read all of the contents of the MemoryMappedFile using the MappedViewAccessor if I don't know the size of it, how can I do it?

I have searched for it, I have seen this question, but it is not the thing I am looking for:

How can I quickly read bytes from a memory mapped file in .NET?

Edit:

There is a problem, the (int)stream.Length is not giving me the correct length, it rather gives the size of the internal buffer used! I need to refresh this question because it is very pressing.

  • 1
    I don't see this as a valid question... just how firmware is sized to fit to regions of memory your data must fit inside the designated area. You have the size of the file created, if you don't have that size then it needs to be provided to you or known before working with the file by an abstraction or API. You could also create a header in the memory mapped file to indicate the length and current offset if required. For instance what if you file size is less than the page size and I write to the area after your size.. – Jay Mar 12 '13 at 13:31
15

Rather use the Stream:

public static Byte[] ReadMMFAllBytes(string fileName)
{
    using (var mmf = MemoryMappedFile.OpenExisting(fileName))
    {
        using (var stream = mmf.CreateViewStream())
        {
            using (BinaryReader binReader = new BinaryReader(stream))
            {
                return binReader.ReadBytes((int)stream.Length);
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 3
    Amer is my younger brother, he is 19, he is always the rescuer!!! thankx Amer ;) – Sawan Feb 19 '13 at 10:04
  • The answer has some problems, please provide a better answer. – Sawan Mar 11 '13 at 19:32
  • amazing, i didn't found any problem reading/writting strings that way, those rounded 4096 bytes go out when getting the string bytes. really very usefull solution. – ElektroStudios Aug 21 '14 at 3:01
  • mine is always 4096 – tofutim Dec 1 '15 at 1:05
6
+25

You can't do that.

A view accessor is created with a minimum size of a system page, which means that it may be larger than the actual file. A view stream is just a stream form of an accessor, so it will also give the same behaviour.

"views are provided in units of system pages, and the size of the view is rounded up to the next system page size"

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267577.aspx

The accessor will gladly read and write outside the actual file without throwing an exception. When reading, any bytes outside the file will just be zero. When writing, the bytes written outside the file are just ignored.

To read the file from a memory mapped file with the exact size of the original file, you have to already know that size.

  • What do you suggest for IPC? put add some tail to the file? or what? – Sawan Mar 5 '13 at 19:09
  • I am thinking in putting the size of the file at the beginning. – Sawan Mar 5 '13 at 19:10
  • @MohamedSakherSawan: Yes, any file structure where the data in the file itself can be used to determine the size would work. – Guffa Mar 5 '13 at 19:39
  • For all that you may as well include the current offset / length in the header as well... – Jay Mar 12 '13 at 13:31
  • @MohamedSakherSawan, are you using memory mapped files for IPC? Why haven't you written it in your question? It is an important detail! – Lorenzo Dematté Mar 12 '13 at 14:49
6

This is difficult to answer since there are still many details of your application that you haven't specified, but I think both Guffa's and Amer's answers are still partially correct:

  • A MemoryMappedFile is more memory than file; it is a sequence of 4Kb pages in memory. So, stream.Length will in fact give you all of the bytes (there is no "internal buffer size"), but it might give you more bytes than you expect since the size will always be rounded up to a 4Kb boundary.
  • The "file" semantic comes from associating the MemoryMappedFile to a real filesystem file. Assuming that the process which creates the file always adjusts the file size, then you can get the precise size of the file via the fileSystem.

If all of the above would fit your application, then the following should work:

    static byte[] ReadMemoryMappedFile(string fileName)
    {
        long length = new FileInfo(fileName).Length;
        using (var stream = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite))
        {
            using (var mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateFromFile(stream, null, length, MemoryMappedFileAccess.Read, null, HandleInheritability.Inheritable, false))
            {
                using (var viewStream = mmf.CreateViewStream(0, length, MemoryMappedFileAccess.Read))
                {
                    using (BinaryReader binReader = new BinaryReader(viewStream))
                    {
                        var result = binReader.ReadBytes((int)length);
                        return result;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

To write the data, you can use this:

    private static void WriteData(string fileName, byte[] data)
    {
        using (var stream = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.ReadWrite))
        {
            using (var mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateFromFile(stream, null, data.Length, MemoryMappedFileAccess.ReadWrite, null, HandleInheritability.Inheritable, true))
            {
                using (var view = mmf.CreateViewAccessor())
                {
                    view.WriteArray(0, data, 0, data.Length);
                }
            }

            stream.SetLength(data.Length);  // Make sure the file is the correct length, in case the data got smaller.
        }
    }

But, by the time you do all of the above you might do just as well to use the file directly and avoid the memory mapping. If mapping it to the filesystem isn't acceptable, then Guffa's answer of encoding the length (or an end marker) in the data itself is probably best.

  • no need to get FileInfo(fileName).Length CreateFromFile internaly make the capacity of the memory mapped file match the size of the file. Just pass 0 as size. – Brans Ds May 6 '16 at 21:31
1

Use FileInfo class to get length as shown below

using System.Data;
using System.IO;
using System.IO.Compression;
using System.IO.MemoryMappedFiles;

// ...

public void WriteToMemoryMap(DataSet ds, string key, string fileName)
{
    var bytes = CompressData(ds);
    using (MemoryMappedFile objMf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateFromFile(fileName, FileMode.OpenOrCreate, key, bytes.Length))
    {
        using (MemoryMappedViewAccessor accessor = objMf.CreateViewAccessor())
        {
            accessor.WriteArray(0, bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
        }
    }
}
public DataSet ReadFromMemoryMap(string fileName)
{
    var fi = new FileInfo(fileName);
    var length = (int)fi.Length;
    var newBytes = new byte[length];
    using (MemoryMappedFile objMf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateFromFile(fileName, FileMode.Open))
    {
        using (MemoryMappedViewAccessor accessor = objMf.CreateViewAccessor())
        {
            accessor.ReadArray(0, newBytes, 0, length);
        }
    }
    return DecompressData(newBytes);
}
public byte[] CompressData(DataSet ds)
{
    try
    {
        byte[] data = null;
        var memStream = new MemoryStream();
        var zipStream = new GZipStream(memStream, CompressionMode.Compress);
        ds.WriteXml(zipStream, XmlWriteMode.WriteSchema);
        zipStream.Close();
        data = memStream.ToArray();
        memStream.Close();
        return data;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return null;
    }
}
public DataSet DecompressData(byte[] data)
{
    try
    {
        var memStream = new MemoryStream(data);
        var unzipStream = new GZipStream(memStream, CompressionMode.Decompress);
        var objDataSet = new DataSet();
        objDataSet.ReadXml(unzipStream, XmlReadMode.ReadSchema);
        unzipStream.Close();
        memStream.Close();
        return objDataSet;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return null;
    }
}
  • If possible please explain a bit more how this code works for the asker to understand why it solves their question. – SuperBiasedMan Jun 5 '15 at 15:08
  • This line is crucial var fi = new FileInfo(fileName); var length = (int)fi.Length; Once he knows the length it will allow him to use to read everything in that file. – user2683973 Jun 5 '15 at 19:20
  • does this work for shared memory? – tofutim Dec 1 '15 at 1:06
  • I don't think you can use FileInfo on a shared memory file. – tofutim Dec 1 '15 at 14:49
0

Just the @Amer Sawan solution translated to Vb.NET:

' Usage Example:
' Dim ReadBytes As Byte() = ReadMemoryMappedFile(Name:="My MemoryMappedFile Name") ' Read the byte-sequence from memory.
' Dim Message As String = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(ReadBytes.ToArray) ' Convert the bytes to String.
' Message = Message.Trim({ControlChars.NullChar}) ' Remove null chars (leading zero-bytes)
' MessageBox.Show(Message, "", MessageBoxButtons.OK) ' Show the message.    '
'
''' <summary>
''' Reads a byte-sequence from a <see cref="IO.MemoryMappedFiles.MemoryMappedFile"/> without knowing the exact size.
''' Note that the returned byte-length is rounded up to 4kb, 
''' this means if the mapped memory-file was written with 1 byte-length, this method will return 4096 byte-length. 
''' </summary>
''' <param name="Name">Indicates an existing <see cref="IO.MemoryMappedFiles.MemoryMappedFile"/> assigned name.</param>
''' <returns>System.Byte().</returns>
Private Function ReadMemoryMappedFile(ByVal Name As String) As Byte()

    Try
        Using MemoryFile As IO.MemoryMappedFiles.MemoryMappedFile =
            IO.MemoryMappedFiles.MemoryMappedFile.OpenExisting(Name, IO.MemoryMappedFiles.MemoryMappedFileRights.ReadWrite)

            Using Stream = MemoryFile.CreateViewStream()

                Using Reader As New BinaryReader(Stream)

                    Return Reader.ReadBytes(CInt(Stream.Length))

                End Using ' Reader

            End Using ' Stream

        End Using ' MemoryFile

    Catch exNoFile As IO.FileNotFoundException
        Throw
        Return Nothing

    Catch ex As Exception
        Throw

    End Try

End Function
0

I would like to have something from MemoryStream .ToArray() method to return all bytes, and the code below work for me:

using (MemoryMappedFile mmf = MemoryMappedFile.OpenExisting(MemoryMappedName))
{
    using (MemoryMappedViewStream stream = mmf.CreateViewStream())
    {
        using (MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            stream.CopyTo(memStream);
            return memStream.ToArray();
        }
    }
}

Cheers!

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