29

This question was already asked, but I still don't get it. I obtain a homography matrix by calling cv::findHomography from a set of points. I need to check whether it's relevant or not.
The proposed method is to calculate maximum reprojection error for inliers and compare it with a threshold. But after such filtration I keep getting insane transformations with object bounding box transforming to almost a straight line or some strange non-convex quadrangle, with self-intersections etc.
What constraints can be used to check if the homography matrix itself is adequate?

1

2 Answers 2

39

Your question is mathematical. Given a matrix of 3x3 decide whether it represents a good rigid transformation. It is hard to define what is "good" but here are some clues that can help you

  1. Homography should preserve the direction of polygonal points. Design a simple test. points (0,0), (imwidth,0), (width,height), (0,height) represent a quadrilateral with clockwise arranged points. Apply homography on those points and see if they are still clockwise arranged if they become counter clockwise your homography is flipping (mirroring) the image which is sometimes still ok. But if your points are out of order than you have a "bad homography"
  2. The homography doesn't change the scale of the object too much. For example if you expect it to shrink or enlarge the image by a factor of up to X, just check this rule. Transform the 4 points (0,0), (imwidth,0), (width-1,height), (0,height) with homography and calculate the area of the quadrilateral (opencv method of calculating area of polygon) if the ratio of areas is too big (or too small), you probably have an error.
  3. Good homography is usually uses low values of perspectivity. Typically if the size of the image is ~1000x1000 pixels those values should be ~0.005-0.001. High perspectivity will cause enormous distortions which are probably an error. If you don't know where those values are located read my post: trying to understand the Affine Transform . It explains the affine transform math and the other 2 values are perspective parameters.

I think that if you check the above 3 condition (condition 2 is the most important) you will be able to detect most of the problems. Good luck

1
  • 1
    In addition to the first suggestion check answers.opencv.org/question/2588/check-if-homography-is-good. Computing the determinant of the what's supposed to be rotation submatrix in the homography and checking whether it's greater or less zero tells you if orientation was preserved (basically computing such determinant is the equivalent of the Pythagorean formula). May 27, 2014 at 12:35
1

Edit: This answer is irrelevant to the question, but the discussion may be helpful for someone who tries to use the matching results for recognition like I did!

This might help someone:

Point2f[] objCorners = { new Point2f(0, 0),
    new Point2f(img1.Cols, 0),
    new Point2f(img1.Cols, img1.Rows),
    new Point2f(0, img1.Rows) };

Point2d[] sceneCorners = MyPerspectiveTransform3(objCorners, homography);
double marginH = img2.Width * 0.1d;
double marginV = img2.Height * 0.1d;
bool homographyOK = isInside(-marginH, -marginV, img2.Width + marginH, img2.Height + marginV, sceneCorners);
if (homographyOK)
    for (int i = 1; i < sceneCorners.Length; i++)
        if (sceneCorners[i - 1].DistanceTo(sceneCorners[i]) < 1)
        {
            homographyOK = false;
            break;
        }
if (homographyOK)
    homographyOK = isConvex(sceneCorners);
if (homographyOK)
    homographyOK = minAngleCheck(sceneCorners, 20d);




     private static bool isInside(dynamic minX, dynamic minY, dynamic maxX, dynamic maxY, dynamic coors)
        {
            foreach (var c in coors)
                if ((c.X < minX) || (c.Y < minY) || (c.X > maxX) || (c.Y > maxY))
                    return false;
            return true;
        }      
        private static bool isLeft(dynamic a, dynamic b, dynamic c)
        {
            return ((b.X - a.X) * (c.Y - a.Y) - (b.Y - a.Y) * (c.X - a.X)) > 0;
        }
        private static bool isConvex<T>(IEnumerable<T> points)
        {
            var lst = points.ToList();
            if (lst.Count > 2)
            {
                bool left = isLeft(lst[0], lst[1], lst[2]);
                lst.Add(lst.First());
                for (int i = 3; i < lst.Count; i++)
                    if (isLeft(lst[i - 2], lst[i - 1], lst[i]) != left)
                        return false;
                return true;
            }
            else
                return false;
        }
        private static bool minAngleCheck<T>(IEnumerable<T> points, double angle_InDegrees)
        {
            //20d * Math.PI / 180d
            var lst = points.ToList();
            if (lst.Count > 2)
            {                
                lst.Add(lst.First());
                for (int i = 2; i < lst.Count; i++)
                {
                    double a1 = angleInDegrees(lst[i - 2], lst[i-1]);
                    double a2 = angleInDegrees(lst[i], lst[i - 1]);
                    double d = Math.Abs(a1 - a2) % 180d;

                    if ((d < angle_InDegrees) || ((180d - d) < angle_InDegrees))
                        return false;
                }
                return true;
            }
            else
                return false;
        }
        private static double angleInDegrees(dynamic v1, dynamic v2)
        {
            return (radianToDegree(Math.Atan2(v1.Y - v2.Y, v1.X - v2.X))) % 360d;
        }
        private static double radianToDegree(double radian)
        {
            var degree = radian * (180d / Math.PI);
            if (degree < 0d)
                degree = 360d + degree;

            return degree;
        }
        static Point2d[] MyPerspectiveTransform3(Point2f[] yourData, Mat transformationMatrix)
        {
            Point2f[] ret = Cv2.PerspectiveTransform(yourData, transformationMatrix);
            return ret.Select(point2fToPoint2d).ToArray();
        }  

enter image description here

18
  • 1
    please excuse I'm working only part time on this issue. You were right the direct distance-comparison between two points before/after homography is indeed only applicable for a small skew value. However what shouldn't be affected is the relation between two distances: d1_before_homography / d2_before_homography != d1_after_homography / d2_after_homography +/- tolerance agreed? Jan 30, 2017 at 14:53
  • 1
    I appreciate you answer. I may not understand something that you see. The stop sign on the left (before homography) has a square shape, say it has 1-1-1-1 unit length each segment. Green lines on right are values after transform seems like 2-2-1-1. Apply formula 1/2==1/2==1/1==1/1 , this is OK for this one for tolerance 1. Is it the same formula on stackoverflow.com/a/12087175/1266873 Also the distances may be OK according to this formula, but the result shape could be a concave or self intersecting, which should be rejected. I hope didn't got you wrong and could express myself clearly
    – Koray
    Jan 30, 2017 at 16:17
  • 1
    Yes I think we have a different perspective on the problem: dx_ before_ homography refers to your left planar (i.e.: the ideal comparison) image of the stop sign. dx_ after _ homography isn't shown here at all. It is the already warped image that resembles the planar, (e.g.: inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs194-26/fa15/upload/files/proj7B/… the rectified and cropped one). If you compare the distances here with the one on the original image, you can easily check whether your homography went wild or it is a plausible result. Jan 30, 2017 at 16:46
  • 1
    Pardon me for the lack of a nice explication via comments. Simply spoken: (1) you have figured out the keypoints. (2) the homography is calculated (3) generate the rectified warped image (4) use the calculated homography not only to stretch the image, but to find out where the keypoints from (1) are on the image of (3). It is simply just kp_bef * homography = kp_aft (I'm not sure about the order of matricies and the inverse homography here). (5) Compare these KP and check if the distances in(1) are alike to the ones in(4) - don't mix (1,4) KP for calculating distance Jan 31, 2017 at 9:06
  • 1
    Note for (5): You have to use the KP from the reference/ideal img for calculating the distances. kp_bef is refering to the kp in the real, raw scene, as certainly kp_aft are the stretched positions taken from the real image. I.e. compare the distance of the ideal kp with the kp from the real but stretched scene Jan 31, 2017 at 9:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.