108

Let's say I have the following record ADT:

data Foo = Bar { a :: Integer, b :: String, c :: String }

I want a function that takes a record and returns a record (of the same type) where all but one of the fields have identical values to the one passed as argument, like so:

walkDuck x = Bar { a = a x, b = b x, c = lemonadeStand (a x) (b x) }

The above works, but for a record with more fields (say 10), creating a such function would entail a lot of typing that I feel is quite unnecessary.

Are there any less tedious ways of doing the same?

  • 3
    Record syntax for updating exists, but quickly gets cumbersome. Take a look at lenses instead. – Cat Plus Plus Feb 19 '13 at 13:15
141

Yes, there's a nice way of updating record fields. In GHCi you can do --

> data Foo = Foo { a :: Int, b :: Int, c :: String }  -- define a Foo
> let foo = Foo { a = 1, b = 2, c = "Hello" }         -- create a Foo
> let updateFoo x = x { c = "Goodbye" }               -- function to update Foos
> updateFoo foo                                       -- update the Foo
Foo {a = 1, b = 2, c = "Goodbye" }
  • 6
    The RecordWildCards extension can be nice as well, to “unpack” fields in a scope. For updates it’s not quite as nice though: incrementA x@Foo{..} = x { a = succ a } – Jon Purdy Feb 19 '13 at 14:14
  • 2
    BTW, in Frege (a Haskell for the JVM) you would define the function as updateFoo x = x.{ c = "Goodbye" } (note the . operator). – 0dB Feb 6 '16 at 14:34
  • Nice video by the way youtube.com/watch?v=YScIPA8RbVE – Damián Rafael Lattenero yesterday
  • Thanks. Sadly been a long time since I wrote any Haskell! – Chris Taylor 16 hours ago
32

This is a good job for lenses:

data Foo = Foo { a :: Int, b :: Int , c :: String }

test = Foo 1 2 "Hello"

Then:

setL c "Goodbye" test

would update field 'c' of 'test' to your string.

  • 4
    And lenses-like packages often define operators in addition to functions for getting and setting fields. For example, test $ c .~ "Goodbye" is how lens would do it iirc. I'm not saying this is intutitive, but once you know the operators then I expect it would come as easily as $. – Thomas M. DuBuisson Feb 19 '13 at 15:06
  • 3
    Do you know where setL has gone? I'm importing Control.Lens, but ghc is reporting that setL is undefined. – dbanas Aug 14 '17 at 13:12
  • 1
    use set instead of setL – Subhod I Mar 8 at 8:12
12

You don’t need to define auxiliary functions or employ lenses. Standard Haskell has already what you need. Let’s take the example by Don Stewart:

data Foo = Foo { a :: Int, b :: Int , c :: String }

test = Foo 1 2 "Hello"

Then you can just say test { c = "Goodbye" } to get an updated record.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.