22

It all started with a trick question that someone posed to me.. (It's mentioned in the book - C# in a nutshell) Here's the gist of it.

Double a = Double.NaN;
Console.WriteLine(a == a); // => false
Console.WriteLine(a.Equals(a)); // => true

The above doesn't seem right. a should always be == to itself (reference equality) & both should be consistent.

Seems like Double overloads the == operator. Confirmed by reflector as follows:

[__DynamicallyInvokable]
public static bool operator ==(double left, double right)
{
    return (left == right);
}

Strange that looks recursive and no mention of the NaN specific behavior. So why does it return false?

So I add some more code to distinguish

var x = "abc";
var y = "xyz";
Console.WriteLine(x == y); // => false

Now I see

    L_0001: ldc.r8 NaN
    L_000a: stloc.0 
    L_000b: ldloc.0 
    L_000c: ldloc.0 
    L_000d: ceq 
    L_000f: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(bool)
    L_0014: nop 
    L_0015: ldloca.s a
    L_0017: ldloc.0 
    L_0018: call instance bool [mscorlib]System.Double::Equals(float64)
    L_001d: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(bool)
    L_0022: nop 
    L_0023: ldstr "abc"
    L_0028: stloc.1 
    L_0029: ldstr "xyz"
    L_002e: stloc.2 
    L_002f: ldloc.1 
    L_0030: ldloc.2 
    L_0031: call bool [mscorlib]System.String::op_Equality(string, string)
    L_0036: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(bool)
  • for doubles, the == operator call translates to a ceq IL opcode
  • where as for strings, it translates to System.String::op_Equality(string, string).

Sure enough the documentation for ceq specifies that it is special-cased for floating point numbers and NaN. This explains the observations.

Questions:

  • Why is the op_Equality defined on Double ? (And the implementation does not factor in the NaN specific behavior)
  • When is it invoked ?
  • 2
    Reflector often fails in such situations. I guess that operator == doesn't call itself, but rather uses ceq internally. – CodesInChaos Feb 19 '13 at 13:02
  • I guess this is the same issue as stackoverflow.com/q/14458890/1236044 – jbl Feb 19 '13 at 13:03
  • @jbl- that question is asking why the 2 equals return different results - which I have seem to have figured out. My question is about the seemingly redundant static op_equality implementation which never seems to be called. – Gishu Feb 20 '13 at 3:37
11

Reflector's erroneous interpretation

The decompilation that you are seeing from Reflector is actually a bug in Reflector. Reflector needs to be able to decompile a function where two doubles are being compared; in those functions, you would find ceq emitted right into the code. As a result, Reflector interprets a ceq instruction as == between two doubles to help decompile a function where two doubles are being compared.

By default, value types don't come with an == implementation. (Don't user-defined structs inherit an overloaded == operator?) However, all of the built-in scalar types have an explicitly overloaded operator that the compiler translates into the appropriate CIL. The overload also contains a simple ceq based comparison, so that dynamic/late-bound/Reflection-based invokes of the == operator overload won't fail.


More details

For predefined value types, the equality operator (==) returns true if the values of its operands are equal, false otherwise. For reference types other than string, == returns true if its two operands refer to the same object. For the string type, == compares the values of the strings.

-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/53k8ybth.aspx

What you said implies that == uses reference type semantics for comparison of a double. However, since double is a value type, it uses value semantics. This is why 3 == 3 is true, even though they're different stack objects.

You can almost think of this compiler translation as how LINQ's Queryable object contains extension methods with code in them, but the compiler translates these calls into expression trees which are passed to the LINQ provider instead. In both cases, the underlying function never really gets called.


Double's comparison semantics

The documentation for Double does allude to how the ceq CIL instruction works:

If two Double.NaN values are tested for equality by calling the Equals method, the method returns true. However, if two NaN values are tested for equality by using the equality operator, the operator returns false. When you want to determine whether the value of a Double is not a number (NaN), an alternative is to call the IsNaN method.

-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ya2zha7s.aspx


Raw compiler source

If you look in the decompiled C# compiler source, you'll find the following code to handle direct translation of double comparisons into ceq:

private void EmitBinaryCondOperator(BoundBinaryOperator binOp, bool sense)
{
    int num;
    ConstantValue constantValue;
    bool flag = sense;
    BinaryOperatorKind kind = binOp.OperatorKind.OperatorWithLogical();
    if (kind <= BinaryOperatorKind.GreaterThanOrEqual)
    {
        switch (kind)
        {
            ...

            case BinaryOperatorKind.Equal:
                goto Label_0127;

            ...
        }
    }
...
Label_0127:
    constantValue = binOp.Left.ConstantValue;
    if (((constantValue != null) && constantValue.IsPrimitiveZeroOrNull) && !constantValue.IsFloating)
    {
        ...
        return;
    }
    constantValue = binOp.Right.ConstantValue;
    if (((constantValue != null) && constantValue.IsPrimitiveZeroOrNull) && !constantValue.IsFloating)
    {
        ...
        return;
    }
    this.EmitBinaryCondOperatorHelper(ILOpCode.Ceq, binOp.Left, binOp.Right, sense);
    return;
}

The above code is from Roslyn.Compilers.CSharp.CodeGen.CodeGenerator.EmitBinaryCondOperator(...), and I added the "..."'s in order to make the code more readable for this purpose.

  • 1
    Nice detailed answer. So to summarize your response, the Double::op_equality operator is invoked but is 'inlined' by the compiler to its implementation i.e. a ceq op code. Reflector is incorrectly decompiling the ceq op code to a == call. Correct? – Gishu Feb 20 '13 at 3:47
  • Wrong choice of words-my mistake. What I meant by 'reference equality' was that an object must always == to itself. So instance1 == instance1 holds true in almost all cases since they are both pointing to the same (refType/valueType) object. (except for Double.Nan - which is an exception to the rule for Mathematical reasons) – Gishu Feb 20 '13 at 3:50
  • @Gishu Perfect tl;dr version :) – David Pfeffer Feb 20 '13 at 5:07
2

In msdn it is stated that;

If two Double.NaN values are tested for equality by calling the Equals method, the method returns true. However, if two NaN values are tested for equality by using the equality operator, the operator returns false. When you want to determine whether the value of a Double is not a number (NaN), an alternative is to call the IsNaN method.

This is done delibaretly to conform with IEC 60559:1989 since it states that two NaN values are not equal as they are not treated as numbers, so op_Equal definition conforms with this standart;

According to IEC 60559:1989, two floating point numbers with values of NaN are never equal.However, according to the specification for the System.Object::Equals method, it's desirable to override this method to provide value equality semantics. Since System.ValueType provides this functionality through the use of Reflection, the description for Object.Equals specifically says that value types should consider overriding the default ValueType implementation to gain a performance increase. In fact from looking at the source of System.ValueType::Equals (line 36 of clr\src\BCL\System\ValueType.cs in the SSCLI), there's even a comment from the CLR Perf team to the effect of System.ValueType::Equals not being fast.

refer to: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/shawnfa/archive/2004/07/19/187792.aspx

1

From msdn : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ya2zha7s.aspx

If two Double.NaN values are tested for equality by calling the Equals method, the method returns true. However, if two NaN values are tested for equality by using the equality operator, the operator returns false. When you want to determine whether the value of a Double is not a number (NaN), an alternative is to call the IsNaN method.

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