9

I have a long string of hexadecimal values that all looks similar to this:

'\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\xff\xff\x00\x00'

The actual string is 1024 frames of a waveform. I want to convert these hexadecimal values to a list of integer values, such as:

[0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 255, 255, 0, 0]

How do I convert these hex values to ints?

  • You have a byte string, which python, when printing, converts to a string literal representation for you. The \x00 escapes are used for any byte that is not a printable ASCII character. – Martijn Pieters Feb 19 '13 at 15:53
6

You can use ord() in combination with map():

>>> s = '\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\xff\xff\x00\x00'
>>> map(ord, s)
[0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 255, 255, 0, 0]
  • Not the best way of doing it, not with struct.unpack() available and capable of interpreting bytes as other types too. – Martijn Pieters Feb 19 '13 at 15:54
  • @MartijnPieters -- But a clever way to do it for this very limited problem ... It made me smile. – mgilson Feb 19 '13 at 15:54
  • This solution is 6 times slower than struct.unpack, btw.. struct takes 0.3 seconds for a million iterations, while map(ord, s) needs 1.8 seconds. – Martijn Pieters Feb 19 '13 at 15:55
  • 1
    @MartijnPieters Relatively, sure.. but how much CPU time would it take relative to everything else happening in the script? Again, code and then optimize. – cdhowie Feb 19 '13 at 16:36
  • 1
    @cdhowie: But knowing beforehand what will be faster wins you half the battle. Stack Overflow gives you the opportunity to be aware of the options you have for a given operation; by adding timing information to the answers here you can make a more informed choice without having to go and optimize this yourself should the need for optimization arise. – Martijn Pieters Feb 19 '13 at 16:39
7

use struct.unpack:

>>> import struct
>>> s = '\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\xff\xff\x00\x00'
>>> struct.unpack('11B',s)
(0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 255, 255, 0, 0)

This gives you a tuple instead of a list, but I trust you can convert it if you need to.

1
In [11]: a
Out[11]: '\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\xff\xff\x00\x00'

In [12]: import array

In [13]: array.array('B', a)
Out[13]: array('B', [0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 255, 255, 0, 0])

Some timings;

$ python -m timeit -s 'text = "\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\xff\xff\x00\x00";' ' map(ord, text)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.775 usec per loop

$ python -m timeit -s 'import array;text = "\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\xff\xff\x00\x00"' 'array.array("B", text)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.29 usec per loop

$ python -m timeit -s 'import struct; text = "\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\xff\xff\x00\x00"'  'struct.unpack("11B",text)'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.165 usec per loop
  • Not bad; 0.665 seconds for a million iterations. struct is still faster, but you can manipulate an array and get a byte representation back with fewer steps. – Martijn Pieters Feb 19 '13 at 15:57
  • how silly! Just noticed, updated! – Fredrik Pihl Feb 19 '13 at 16:18
  • 1
    Timings with a 1024-byte string: pastie.org/6226168; array wins then. – Martijn Pieters Feb 19 '13 at 16:31
  • @MartijnPieters - praise from the master! Guido can't be wrong optimization anectode – Fredrik Pihl Feb 19 '13 at 16:34

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