Given I have a circular reference in a large JavaScript object

And I try JSON.stringify(problematicObject)

And the browser throws

"TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON"

(which is expected)

Then I want to find the cause of this circular reference, preferably using Chrome developer tools? Is this possible? How do you find and fix circular references in a large object?

  • can you post what problematicObject is? – jbabey Feb 19 '13 at 16:10
  • @jbabey - JSON.stringify(window); is one case that will create that error. – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 19 '13 at 16:15
  • Is it a native object (e.g. created via {}, or one of the native functions), or a host object (e.g. a DOM element)? – Šime Vidas Feb 19 '13 at 16:23

11 Answers 11

Pulled from http://blog.vjeux.com/2011/javascript/cyclic-object-detection.html. One line added to detect where the cycle is. Paste this into the Chrome dev tools:

function isCyclic (obj) {
  var seenObjects = [];

  function detect (obj) {
    if (obj && typeof obj === 'object') {
      if (seenObjects.indexOf(obj) !== -1) {
        return true;
      }
      seenObjects.push(obj);
      for (var key in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key) && detect(obj[key])) {
          console.log(obj, 'cycle at ' + key);
          return true;
        }
      }
    }
    return false;
  }

  return detect(obj);
}

Here's the test:

> a = {}
> b = {}
> a.b = b; b.a = a;
> isCyclic(a)
  Object {a: Object}
   "cycle at a"
  Object {b: Object}
   "cycle at b"
  true
  • Don't forget to add the root JSON object itself to seenObjects. It should be var seenObjects = [obj];. – Aadit M Shah Feb 19 '13 at 16:37
  • @AaditMShah, since detect is called on the input object, that would cause it to immediately exit claiming there is a cycle directly from the input object to itself. – Mike Samuel Feb 19 '13 at 16:44
  • 3
    This false positives on null and isn't recursive – Andy Ray Jun 24 '14 at 5:27
  • 16
    Just because a reference is used more than once doesn't necessarily mean that it's cyclic. var x = {}; JSON.stringify([x,x]) is fine... while var x = {}; x.x = x; JSON.stringify(x); is not. – canon May 14 '15 at 13:58
  • 1
    For some reason when I use this solution, it gives me an error: obj.hasOwnProperty is not a function. This is running inside a script loaded by the browser. – Ayush Goel Mar 21 at 18:11

@tmack's answer is definitely what I was looking for when I found this question!

Unfortunately it returns many false positives - it returns true if an object is replicated in the JSON, which isn't the same as circularity. Circularity means that an object is its own child, e.g.

obj.key1.key2.[...].keyX === obj

I modified the original answer, and this is working for me:

function isCyclic(obj) {
  var keys = [];
  var stack = [];
  var stackSet = new Set();
  var detected = false;

  function detect(obj, key) {
    if (obj && typeof obj != 'object') { return; }

    if (stackSet.has(obj)) { // it's cyclic! Print the object and its locations.
      var oldindex = stack.indexOf(obj);
      var l1 = keys.join('.') + '.' + key;
      var l2 = keys.slice(0, oldindex + 1).join('.');
      console.log('CIRCULAR: ' + l1 + ' = ' + l2 + ' = ' + obj);
      console.log(obj);
      detected = true;
      return;
    }

    keys.push(key);
    stack.push(obj);
    stackSet.add(obj);
    for (var k in obj) { //dive on the object's children
      if (obj.hasOwnProperty(k)) { detect(obj[k], k); }
    }

    keys.pop();
    stack.pop();
    stackSet.delete(obj);
    return;
  }

  detect(obj, 'obj');
  return detected;
}

Here are a few very simple tests:

var root = {}
var leaf = {'isleaf':true};
var cycle2 = {l:leaf};
var cycle1 = {c2: cycle2, l:leaf};
cycle2.c1 = cycle1
root.leaf = leaf

isCyclic(cycle1); // returns true, logs "CIRCULAR: obj.c2.c1 = obj"
isCyclic(cycle2); // returns true, logs "CIRCULAR: obj.c1.c2 = obj"
isCyclic(leaf); // returns false
isCyclic(root); // returns false
  • Adding memoization to make this O(N) is left as an exercise for the reader :) – Aaron V Jan 20 '16 at 19:46
  • I added a TypeScript version of this answer as a new answer. See below. – mvermand Sep 28 '17 at 5:04
  • 2
    if (typeof obj != 'object') { return; } should be if (obj && typeof obj != 'object') { return; } because typeof null == "object". – jcubic Sep 29 '17 at 7:55
  • 1
    @Willwsharp - it's been a while, but I believe the idea was that it's definitely possible to encounter the same object more than once, even in a non-circular structure. So, in the worst case, the code I wrote here would process the same objects over and over again, making this needlessly O(N^2). You could use memoization to store each object's children and prevent reprocessing. – Aaron V Jun 13 at 19:12
  • 1
    @AaronV oh awesome! I worked a little more on it and I came to the same conclusion so glad to hear I was on the right path; thanks! – Willwsharp Jun 14 at 13:38

CircularReferenceDetector

Here is my CircularReferenceDetector class which outputs all the property stack information where the circularly referenced value is actually located at and also shows where the culprit references are.

This is especially useful for huge structures where it is not obvious by the key which value is the source of the harm.

It outputs the circularly referenced value stringified but all references to itself replaced by "[Circular object --- fix me]".

Usage:
CircularReferenceDetector.detectCircularReferences(value);

Note: Remove the Logger.* statements if you do not want to use any logging or do not have a logger available.

Technical Explanation:
The recursive function goes through all properties of the object and tests if JSON.stringify succeeds on them or not. If it does not succeed (circular reference), then it tests if it succeeds by replacing value itself with some constant string. This would mean that if it succeeds using this replacer, this value is the being circularly referenced value. If it is not, it recursively goes through all properties of that object.

Meanwhile it also tracks the property stack to give you information where the culprit value is located at.

Typescript

import {Logger} from "../Logger";

export class CircularReferenceDetector {

    static detectCircularReferences(toBeStringifiedValue: any, serializationKeyStack: string[] = []) {
        Object.keys(toBeStringifiedValue).forEach(key => {
            var value = toBeStringifiedValue[key];

            var serializationKeyStackWithNewKey = serializationKeyStack.slice();
            serializationKeyStackWithNewKey.push(key);
            try {
                JSON.stringify(value);
                Logger.debug(`path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" is ok`);
            } catch (error) {
                Logger.debug(`path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" JSON.stringify results in error: ${error}`);

                var isCircularValue:boolean;
                var circularExcludingStringifyResult:string = "";
                try {
                    circularExcludingStringifyResult = JSON.stringify(value, CircularReferenceDetector.replaceRootStringifyReplacer(value), 2);
                    isCircularValue = true;
                } catch (error) {
                    Logger.debug(`path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" is not the circular source`);
                    CircularReferenceDetector.detectCircularReferences(value, serializationKeyStackWithNewKey);
                    isCircularValue = false;
                }
                if (isCircularValue) {
                    throw new Error(`Circular reference detected:\nCircularly referenced value is value under path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStackWithNewKey)}" of the given root object\n`+
                        `Calling stringify on this value but replacing itself with [Circular object --- fix me] ( <-- search for this string) results in:\n${circularExcludingStringifyResult}\n`);
                }
            }
        });
    }

    private static replaceRootStringifyReplacer(toBeStringifiedValue: any): any {
        var serializedObjectCounter = 0;

        return function (key: any, value: any) {
            if (serializedObjectCounter !== 0 && typeof(toBeStringifiedValue) === 'object' && toBeStringifiedValue === value) {
                Logger.error(`object serialization with key ${key} has circular reference to being stringified object`);
                return '[Circular object --- fix me]';
            }

            serializedObjectCounter++;

            return value;
        }
    }
}

export class Util {

    static joinStrings(arr: string[], separator: string = ":") {
        if (arr.length === 0) return "";
        return arr.reduce((v1, v2) => `${v1}${separator}${v2}`);
    }

}

Compiled JavaScript from TypeScript

"use strict";
const Logger_1 = require("../Logger");
class CircularReferenceDetector {
    static detectCircularReferences(toBeStringifiedValue, serializationKeyStack = []) {
        Object.keys(toBeStringifiedValue).forEach(key => {
            var value = toBeStringifiedValue[key];
            var serializationKeyStackWithNewKey = serializationKeyStack.slice();
            serializationKeyStackWithNewKey.push(key);
            try {
                JSON.stringify(value);
                Logger_1.Logger.debug(`path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" is ok`);
            }
            catch (error) {
                Logger_1.Logger.debug(`path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" JSON.stringify results in error: ${error}`);
                var isCircularValue;
                var circularExcludingStringifyResult = "";
                try {
                    circularExcludingStringifyResult = JSON.stringify(value, CircularReferenceDetector.replaceRootStringifyReplacer(value), 2);
                    isCircularValue = true;
                }
                catch (error) {
                    Logger_1.Logger.debug(`path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" is not the circular source`);
                    CircularReferenceDetector.detectCircularReferences(value, serializationKeyStackWithNewKey);
                    isCircularValue = false;
                }
                if (isCircularValue) {
                    throw new Error(`Circular reference detected:\nCircularly referenced value is value under path "${Util.joinStrings(serializationKeyStackWithNewKey)}" of the given root object\n` +
                        `Calling stringify on this value but replacing itself with [Circular object --- fix me] ( <-- search for this string) results in:\n${circularExcludingStringifyResult}\n`);
                }
            }
        });
    }
    static replaceRootStringifyReplacer(toBeStringifiedValue) {
        var serializedObjectCounter = 0;
        return function (key, value) {
            if (serializedObjectCounter !== 0 && typeof (toBeStringifiedValue) === 'object' && toBeStringifiedValue === value) {
                Logger_1.Logger.error(`object serialization with key ${key} has circular reference to being stringified object`);
                return '[Circular object --- fix me]';
            }
            serializedObjectCounter++;
            return value;
        };
    }
}
exports.CircularReferenceDetector = CircularReferenceDetector;
class Util {
    static joinStrings(arr, separator = ":") {
        if (arr.length === 0)
            return "";
        return arr.reduce((v1, v2) => `${v1}${separator}${v2}`);
    }
}
exports.Util = Util;

  • 2
    Should publish this to npm – Jack Murphy Apr 18 '17 at 14:23

This is a fix for both @Trey Mack and @Freddie Nfbnm answers on the typeof obj != 'object' condition. Instead it should test if the obj value is not instance of object, so that it can also work when checking values with object familiarity (for example, functions and symbols (symbols aren't instance of object, but still addressed, btw.)).

I'm posting this as an answer since I can't comment in this StackExchange account yet.

PS.: feel free to request me to delete this answer.

function isCyclic(obj) {
  var keys = [];
  var stack = [];
  var stackSet = new Set();
  var detected = false;

  function detect(obj, key) {
    if (!(obj instanceof Object)) { return; } // Now works with other
                                              // kinds of object.

    if (stackSet.has(obj)) { // it's cyclic! Print the object and its locations.
      var oldindex = stack.indexOf(obj);
      var l1 = keys.join('.') + '.' + key;
      var l2 = keys.slice(0, oldindex + 1).join('.');
      console.log('CIRCULAR: ' + l1 + ' = ' + l2 + ' = ' + obj);
      console.log(obj);
      detected = true;
      return;
    }

    keys.push(key);
    stack.push(obj);
    stackSet.add(obj);
    for (var k in obj) { //dive on the object's children
      if (obj.hasOwnProperty(k)) { detect(obj[k], k); }
    }

    keys.pop();
    stack.pop();
    stackSet.delete(obj);
    return;
  }

  detect(obj, 'obj');
  return detected;
}

You can also use JSON.stringify with try/catch

function hasCircularDependency(obj)
{
    try
    {
        JSON.stringify(obj);
    }
    catch(e)
    {
        return e.includes("Converting circular structure to JSON"); 
    }
    return false;
}

Demo

function hasCircularDependency(obj) {
  try {
    JSON.stringify(obj);
  } catch (e) {
    return String(e).includes("Converting circular structure to JSON");
  }
  return false;
}

var a = {b:{c:{d:""}}};
console.log(hasCircularDependency(a));
a.b.c.d = a;
console.log(hasCircularDependency(a));

  • )) This is definitely incorrect approach, which I've found as the simpliest solution – Undefitied May 24 at 8:56

I just made this. It may be dirty, but works anyway... :P

function dump(orig){
  var inspectedObjects = [];
  console.log('== DUMP ==');
  (function _dump(o,t){
    console.log(t+' Type '+(typeof o));
    for(var i in o){
      if(o[i] === orig){
        console.log(t+' '+i+': [recursive]'); 
        continue;
      }
      var ind = 1+inspectedObjects.indexOf(o[i]);
      if(ind>0) console.log(t+' '+i+':  [already inspected ('+ind+')]');
      else{
        console.log(t+' '+i+': ('+inspectedObjects.push(o[i])+')');
        _dump(o[i],t+'>>');
      }
    }
  }(orig,'>'));
}

Then

var a = [1,2,3], b = [a,4,5,6], c = {'x':a,'y':b};
a.push(c); dump(c);

Says

== DUMP ==
> Type object
> x: (1)
>>> Type object
>>> 0: (2)
>>>>> Type number
>>> 1: (3)
>>>>> Type number
>>> 2: (4)
>>>>> Type number
>>> 3: [recursive]
> y: (5)
>>> Type object
>>> 0:  [already inspected (1)]
>>> 1: (6)
>>>>> Type number
>>> 2: (7)
>>>>> Type number
>>> 3: (8)
>>>>> Type number

This tells that c.x[3] is equal to c, and c.x = c.y[0].

Or, a little edit to this function can tell you what you need...

function findRecursive(orig){
  var inspectedObjects = [];
  (function _find(o,s){
    for(var i in o){
      if(o[i] === orig){
        console.log('Found: obj.'+s.join('.')+'.'+i); 
        return;
      }
      if(inspectedObjects.indexOf(o[i])>=0) continue;
      else{
        inspectedObjects.push(o[i]);
        s.push(i); _find(o[i],s); s.pop(i);
      }
    }
  }(orig,[]));
}
  • The inspectedObjects array should contain the original JSON object itself (i.e. it should be var inspectedObjects = [orig];). – Aadit M Shah Feb 19 '13 at 16:39
  • I intentionally separated checking about the original object (by if(o[i] === orig)) and other objects (by inspectedObjects.indexOf(o[i])). – JiminP Feb 19 '13 at 17:02
  • 1
    Just because a reference is used more than once doesn't necessarily mean that it's cyclic. var x = {}; JSON.stringify([x,x]) is fine... while var x = {}; x.x = x; JSON.stringify(x); is not. – canon May 14 '15 at 13:57

Here is @Thomas's answer adapted for node:

const {logger} = require("../logger")
// Or: const logger = {debug: (...args) => console.log.call(console.log, args) }

const joinStrings = (arr, separator) => {
  if (arr.length === 0) return "";
  return arr.reduce((v1, v2) => `${v1}${separator}${v2}`);
}

exports.CircularReferenceDetector = class CircularReferenceDetector {

  detectCircularReferences(toBeStringifiedValue, serializationKeyStack = []) {
    Object.keys(toBeStringifiedValue).forEach(key => {
      let value = toBeStringifiedValue[key];

      let serializationKeyStackWithNewKey = serializationKeyStack.slice();
      serializationKeyStackWithNewKey.push(key);
      try {
        JSON.stringify(value);
        logger.debug(`path "${joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" is ok`);
      } catch (error) {
        logger.debug(`path "${joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" JSON.stringify results in error: ${error}`);

        let isCircularValue;
        let circularExcludingStringifyResult = "";
        try {
          circularExcludingStringifyResult = JSON.stringify(value, this.replaceRootStringifyReplacer(value), 2);
          isCircularValue = true;
        } catch (error) {
          logger.debug(`path "${joinStrings(serializationKeyStack)}" is not the circular source`);
          this.detectCircularReferences(value, serializationKeyStackWithNewKey);
          isCircularValue = false;
        }
        if (isCircularValue) {
          throw new Error(`Circular reference detected:\nCircularly referenced value is value under path "${joinStrings(serializationKeyStackWithNewKey)}" of the given root object\n`+
              `Calling stringify on this value but replacing itself with [Circular object --- fix me] ( <-- search for this string) results in:\n${circularExcludingStringifyResult}\n`);
        }
      }
    });
  }

  replaceRootStringifyReplacer(toBeStringifiedValue) {
    let serializedObjectCounter = 0;

    return function (key, value) {
      if (serializedObjectCounter !== 0 && typeof(toBeStringifiedValue) === 'object' && toBeStringifiedValue === value) {
        logger.error(`object serialization with key ${key} has circular reference to being stringified object`);
        return '[Circular object --- fix me]';
      }

      serializedObjectCounter++;

      return value;
    }
  }
}

I converted the answer of Freddie Nfbnm to TypeScript:

export class JsonUtil {

    static isCyclic(json) {
        const keys = [];
        const stack = [];
        const stackSet = new Set();
        let detected = false;

        function detect(obj, key) {
            if (typeof obj !== 'object') {
                return;
            }

            if (stackSet.has(obj)) { // it's cyclic! Print the object and its locations.
                const oldIndex = stack.indexOf(obj);
                const l1 = keys.join('.') + '.' + key;
                const l2 = keys.slice(0, oldIndex + 1).join('.');
                console.log('CIRCULAR: ' + l1 + ' = ' + l2 + ' = ' + obj);
                console.log(obj);
                detected = true;
                return;
            }

            keys.push(key);
            stack.push(obj);
            stackSet.add(obj);
            for (const k in obj) { // dive on the object's children
                if (obj.hasOwnProperty(k)) {
                    detect(obj[k], k);
                }
            }

            keys.pop();
            stack.pop();
            stackSet.delete(obj);
            return;
        }

        detect(json, 'obj');
        return detected;
    }

}

If you are looking to log the object, then Circular-JSON https://github.com/WebReflection/circular-json might work for you.

Here is a Node ES6 version mixed from the answers from @Aaron V and @user4976005, it fixes the problem with the call to hasOwnProperty:

const isCyclic = (obj => {
  const keys = []
  const stack = []
  const stackSet = new Set()
  let detected = false

  const detect = ((object, key) => {
    if (!(object instanceof Object))
      return

    if (stackSet.has(object)) { // it's cyclic! Print the object and its locations.
      const oldindex = stack.indexOf(object)
      const l1 = `${keys.join('.')}.${key}`
      const l2 = keys.slice(0, oldindex + 1).join('.')
      console.log(`CIRCULAR: ${l1} = ${l2} = ${object}`)
      console.log(object)
      detected = true
      return
    }

    keys.push(key)
    stack.push(object)
    stackSet.add(object)
    Object.keys(object).forEach(k => { // dive on the object's children
      if (k && Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(object, k))
        detect(object[k], k)
    })

    keys.pop()
    stack.pop()
    stackSet.delete(object)
  })

  detect(obj, 'obj')
  return detected
})

Try using console.log() on the chrome/firefox browser to identify where the issue encountered.

On Firefox using Firebug plugin, you can debug your javascript line by line.

Update:

Refer below example of circular reference issue and which has been handled:-

// JSON.stringify, avoid TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON
// Demo: Circular reference
var o = {};
o.o = o;

var cache = [];
JSON.stringify(o, function(key, value) {
    if (typeof value === 'object' && value !== null) {
        if (cache.indexOf(value) !== -1) {
            // Circular reference found, discard key
            alert("Circular reference found, discard key");
            return;
        }
        alert("value = '" + value + "'");
        // Store value in our collection
        cache.push(value);
    }
    return value;
});
cache = null; // Enable garbage collection

var a = {b:1};
var o = {};
o.one = a;
o.two = a;
// one and two point to the same object, but two is discarded:
JSON.stringify(o);

var obj = {
  a: "foo",
  b: obj
};

var replacement = {"b":undefined};

alert("Result : " + JSON.stringify(obj,replacement));

Refer example LIVE DEMO

  • 4
    You mean manually searching for the reference? That's more the last resort than a good solution. – Šime Vidas Feb 19 '13 at 16:12
  • 2
    "you can debug your javascript line by line" - The bulit-in JSON.stringify() is not implemented in JavaScript, but native code. You can't debug it with Firebug. – Šime Vidas Feb 19 '13 at 16:15
  • 1
    There's lots of libraries that provide a stringify() function in javascript for older browsers. Maybe you could use one of those? That would presumably break at the exact point it's parsing the problem reference. – kbelder Feb 19 '13 at 16:26
  • Just because a reference is used more than once doesn't necessarily mean that it's cyclic. var x = {}; JSON.stringify([x,x]) is fine... while var x = {}; x.x = x; JSON.stringify(x); is not. – canon May 14 '15 at 13:52

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