11

I'm trying to re-factor a large and frequently used part of my application into separate methods to make it easier to maintain.

Some of these methods asks the user for input and does input validation, so I've used a Scanner and System.in But when I close my Scanner I also close System.in

So my question is, can I only prevent System.in being closed by shielding it with CloseShieldInputStream or should I just start passing a Scanner to the methods?

  • Please post some code... – nkukhar Feb 19 '13 at 16:14
  • 5
    Do you really need to close the Scanner? I'd suggest letting the garbage collector handle it - there's no way of closing it without closing the underlying object. – ddmps Feb 19 '13 at 16:15
  • 1
    My method declares a Scanner, reads and returns nextLine(), closes the Scanner and gives me a headache on the next run. If I do not close it, Eclipse pesters me about a potential resource leak, would it be safe to ignore that? – deepy Feb 19 '13 at 16:15
3

You can just ignore close by implementing custom decorator.

public class UnClosableDecorator extends InputStream {

    private final InputStream inputStream;

    public UnClosableDecorator(InputStream inputStream) {
        this.inputStream = inputStream;
    }

    @Override
    public int read() throws IOException {
        return inputStream.read();
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte[] b) throws IOException {
        return inputStream.read(b);
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte[] b, int off, int len) throws IOException {
        return inputStream.read(b, off, len);
    }

    @Override
    public long skip(long n) throws IOException {
        return inputStream.skip(n);
    }

    @Override
    public int available() throws IOException {
        return inputStream.available();
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void mark(int readlimit) {
        inputStream.mark(readlimit);
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void reset() throws IOException {
        inputStream.reset();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean markSupported() {
        return inputStream.markSupported();
    }

    @Override
    public void close() throws IOException {
        //do nothing
    }
}

And use it in main

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        System.setIn(new UnClosableDecorator(System.in));
}
  • Wouldn't this be the same as writing my own version of CloseShieldInputStream? – deepy Feb 19 '13 at 16:33
  • I'm not quite sure what do you mean, but if you need to perform some actions with input stream on close do this actions in UnClosableDecorator.close() method – nkukhar Feb 19 '13 at 16:36
  • 1
    CloseShieldInputStream is a proxy stream that prevents the underlying input stream from being closed. commons.apache.org/io/apidocs/org/apache/commons/io/input/… – deepy Feb 19 '13 at 17:03
  • Actually my implementation is not the same as CloseShieldInputStream. CloseShieldInputStream on close will replace input stream with dummy object that on read always returns -1 (it means that InputStream is closed) and my implementation on close just do nothing. I'm not sure what solution will be more appropriate for you. – nkukhar Feb 19 '13 at 18:35
  • 1
    I suspect I should just start passing Scanners around instead, it seems to be the least painful way in the end. – deepy Feb 20 '13 at 1:25
16

Simply use a custom FilterInputStream instead of System.in:

new FilterInputStream(System.in) {
    @Override
    public void close() throws IOException {
        //don't close System.in! 
    }
}
  • 2
    way simpler than the accepted answer! thanks. – Martin Charlesworth Sep 30 '14 at 10:08
  • 2
    This is pretty much what commons' CloseShieldInputStream does and if you end up this position, you may want to have another look at the design of your software. A solution like this shouldn't be needed unless you're working with third-party solutions. (applies to all the answers here) – deepy Sep 30 '14 at 14:28
1

you could just let it be without closing it, just set the holding variable to null

  • With that Eclipse gives a warning about scanner never being closed, is this safe to ignore? – deepy Feb 19 '13 at 16:21
  • I think it is an improvable programming style. The programmer might end up leaving open resources that must indeed be closed. – Raúl Salinas-Monteagudo Nov 11 '13 at 12:28

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