0

How do I invoke the pure virtual function "pvf()" here? Could somebody please shed some light in this? ...............................................................

#include<iostream>

using namespace std; 

class a
{
public:
    a()
    {
        this->pvf();
        this->p();
    }

    virtual int pvf() = 0;

    virtual void p()
    {
        cout << "\n p fun";
    }
};

int a::pvf()
{
    cout<<"\n pure";
}

class b : public a
{
    int i,j,k;

    void o()
    {
        cout<<"\n der";
    }
};

int main()
{
    //b b1; 
}
2
  • 2
    Did you mean pf() ? p() is not pure.
    – Bryan
    Feb 19 '13 at 18:27
  • 1
    Your indentation is quite inventive. Feb 19 '13 at 18:32
6

Inside the constructor of the a type, the object is still of type a. Any call to a virtual function there will not be dispatched any overrider bellow a in the hierarchy. This means that the call this->pf(); inside a::a(); will fail.

If you really want to call a::pf, then you must disable dynamic dispatch for that call, and you do that by adding the extra qualification: a::pf() (or this->a::pf();)

4
  • What is the point of calling pure virtual method? Does language spec allow that anyway?
    – Spook
    Feb 19 '13 at 18:35
  • 2
    @Spook: The language does allow it, and it might be handy to force subtypes to implement a function but provide a sensible default. The pure qualifier will require the user to provide an override in the derived type, even if it is just a forwarding call int b::pf() { return a::pf(); } --calls the default implementation. Feb 19 '13 at 18:37
  • 1
    Whoa... didn't know that it's possible. Another language caveat. +1 for additional explanation.
    – Spook
    Feb 19 '13 at 18:39
  • @DavidRodríguez-dribeas great answer - especially the "forwarder" tidbit with the derived-type override calling the default implementation. Feb 19 '13 at 18:52
2

I assume you mean pf, since p is not pure. You can call it by specifying a non-virtual call:

this->a::pf();

Or perhaps you're asking, why do you observe the pure virtual function being called from the constructor, rather than whatever override is presumably missing from the derived class?

Calling a virtual function from a constructor or destructor chooses the function according to the currently constructed class, not the final derived class. If the function is pure in the current class, then behaviour is undefined - it might call the pure function if it has an implementation, or call some other override, or crash, or anything else you can imagine.

1
  • Don't quite understand the downvote. The question is not clear as of whether the OP questions how the function is being called or else if he really wants the call to happen and does not know how... +1 to compensate the downvote. Feb 19 '13 at 18:34
0
#include<iostream>

using namespace std; 

class a
{
public:
    a()
    {

    }

    virtual int pvf() = 0;

    virtual void p()
    {
        cout << "\n p fun";
    }
};

int a::pvf()
{
    cout<<"\n pure";
}

class b : public a
{
    public:
    int i,j,k;

    int pvf(){cout<<" b pvf ";
    }
};

int main()
{
    b b; 
    b.a::pvf();

}

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