4

This might seem simple but it's just stumbled me and my friends...

lets take the following piece of code- in java

//........

int a=10;
a= a-- + a--;
System.out.print("a="+a);
//........

in c

//........

int a=10;
a= a-- + a--;
printf("a= %d",a);
//.......

where in the former case you get output as 19 in C you get it as 18. the logic in c is understandable but in java?

in java if its like

int a=10;
a=a++;

in this case the output is 10.

So what's the logic?

  • Looks like: a=a++; ==> tmp=a; a=a+1; a=tmp; – sambowry Sep 30 '09 at 10:51
  • ok so what about a=a++; for a=10 what should be the output? – sg88 Sep 30 '09 at 11:08
  • hey guys, what about the last bit of the question? a=10; a=a++; ...print a its showing 10 as output?? should it not be 11? – sg88 Sep 30 '09 at 11:30
13

a = a-- + a-- causes undefined behaviour in C. C does not define which decrement should be evaluated first.

a-- evaluates to the value of a, and after that it decrements a, so in Java a = a-- + a-- evaluates like this:

a = (10, decrement a) + (9, decrement a)

The second operand is 9 because first term caused a to be decremented.

In summary: With that expression, C does not define the evaluation order. Java defines it to be from left to right.

  • If I understand a will be 19. The last decrement isn't effective for the result. – Martijn Courteaux Sep 30 '09 at 11:31
  • Yes, the last decrement does not show up because right after that we assign 19 to a. – hrnt Sep 30 '09 at 11:40
4

I don't know about Java but in C that line of code doesn't have a return value defined in the standard. Compilers are free to interpret it as they please.

2

In the expression

a = a-- + a--;

you have a lot of sub-expressions that need to be evaluated before the whole of the expression is evaluated.

a = a-- + a--;
          ^^^ <= sub-expression 2
    ^^^       <= sub-expression 1

What's the value of sub-expression 1? It's the current value of the object a.
What's the value of the object a?

If the sub-expression 2 was already evaluated, value of object a is 9, otherwise it is 10.

Same thing for sub-expression 2. Its value can be either 9 or 10, depending on whether sub-expression 1 was already evaluated.

The C compiler (don't know about Java) is free to evaluate the sub-expressions in any order

So let's say the compiler chose to leave the --s for last

a = 10 + 10;
a--; /* 19 */
a--; /* 18 */

but on the next compilation the compiler did the --s up front

/* value of sub-expression 1 is 10 */
/* value of sub-expression 2 is 9 */
a = 10 + 9; /* a = 9 + 10; */

or it could even save one of the a-- and use that for the final value of a

/* sub-expression 1 yields 10 and sets the value of `a` to 9 */
/* so yield that 10, but save the value for the end */
a = 10 + ???;
a = 18???; a = 19???;
/* remember the saved value */
a = 9

Or, as you invoked undefined behaviour, it could simply replace your statement with any of the following

  • a = 42;
  • /* */
  • fprintf(stderr, "BANG!");
  • system("format C:");
  • for (p=0; p<MEMORY_SIZE; p++) *p = 0;
  • etc ...
0

You are post-decrementing. To me, the java result makes more sense.

The first a-- is evaluated as 10, and decrements to 9. 10 is the value of this sub-expression.

The second a-- is evaluated. a is now 9, and decrements to 8. The value of this sub-expression is 9.

So, it becomes 10 + 9 = 19. The two decrements get overwritten by the assignment.

I'd expect 18 if the expression were a= --a + --a.

Have you tried compiling the C version with different optimization flags?

  • I'd expect 17 for --a + --a, as that should be 9 + 8. – Andrzej Doyle Sep 30 '09 at 10:50
  • --a + --a in C could easily be 16. It's up to the compiler. – dave4420 Sep 30 '09 at 11:22
0
a= a-- + a--;

This invokes undefined behaviour in C/C++. You should not expect consistent results from this statement.

0
a = 10 + 9

you can try with:

a = a-- + a-- + a--

it returns 27 ( 10 + 9 + 8)...

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