104

I have a raw string. I just want to validate whether the string is valid JSON or not. I'm using JSON.NET.

153

Through Code:

Your best bet is to use parse inside a try-catch and catch exception in case of failed parsing. (I am not aware of any TryParse method).

(Using JSON.Net)

Simplest way would be to Parse the string using JToken.Parse, and also to check if the string starts with { or [ and ends with } or ] respectively (added from this answer):

private static bool IsValidJson(string strInput)
{
    strInput = strInput.Trim();
    if ((strInput.StartsWith("{") && strInput.EndsWith("}")) || //For object
        (strInput.StartsWith("[") && strInput.EndsWith("]"))) //For array
    {
        try
        {
            var obj = JToken.Parse(strInput);
            return true;
        }
        catch (JsonReaderException jex)
        {
            //Exception in parsing json
            Console.WriteLine(jex.Message);
            return false;
        }
        catch (Exception ex) //some other exception
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
            return false;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}

The reason to add checks for { or [ etc was based on the fact that JToken.Parse would parse the values such as "1234" or "'a string'" as a valid token. The other option could be to use both JObject.Parse and JArray.Parse in parsing and see if anyone of them succeeds, but I believe checking for {} and [] should be easier. (Thanks @RhinoDevel for pointing it out)

Without JSON.Net

You can utilize .Net framework 4.5 System.Json namespace ,like:

string jsonString = "someString";
try
{
    var tmpObj = JsonValue.Parse(jsonString);
}
catch (FormatException fex)
{
    //Invalid json format
    Console.WriteLine(fex);
}
catch (Exception ex) //some other exception
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
}

(But, you have to install System.Json through Nuget package manager using command: PM> Install-Package System.Json -Version 4.0.20126.16343 on Package Manager Console) (taken from here)

Non-Code way:

Usually, when there is a small json string and you are trying to find a mistake in the json string, then I personally prefer to use available on-line tools. What I usually do is:

  • 2
    How can do this at runtime. I don't want to use try catch for validation purpose – user960567 Feb 20 '13 at 10:49
  • 1
    You can create a Schema for your JSON and later verify against that schema see: Json.NET 3.5 Beta 2 – JSON schema validation – Habib Feb 20 '13 at 10:51
  • 1
    Using JSON.Net: This does not throw an exception: JToken.Parse("1234")! Might be a good idea to check first, if string starts with [ or {. Another alternative is use JObject.Parse() and JArray.Parse(). – RhinoDevel Nov 24 '15 at 8:26
  • 1
    JToken.Parse("{a:1}") does not throw exception even though this is invalid JSON - a should be quoted (stackoverflow.com/q/949449/3116322) – Ande Mar 10 '16 at 16:17
  • 1
    I checked in the ECMA-ST Standard and there an Object is clearly defined as { <string> : <value> } ... so no there cant be a valid {a:"lksf"} .... From the Standard: A string is a sequence of Unicode code points wrapped with quotation marks (U+0022) And an Object is defined as { <string> : <value> } - therefore not allowing {a:"lksdf"} because a is no string in their definition – Dominik Lemberger Mar 23 '17 at 7:58
26

Use JContainer.Parse(str) method to check if the str is a valid Json. If this throws exception then it is not a valid Json.

JObject.Parse - Can be used to check if the string is a valid Json object
JArray.Parse - Can be used to check if the string is a valid Json Array
JContainer.Parse - Can be used to check for both Json object & Array

  • 17
    Instead of JContainer it's more valid to use type JToken since Parse() method is declared at this level – Denis The Menace Feb 9 '15 at 12:40
  • 5
    I am assuming that you are talking about JSON.Net: JContainer does not work that way, because it won't throw an exception in all wanted cases. Example: JContainer.Parse("1234");. – RhinoDevel Nov 24 '15 at 8:43
11

Building on Habib's answer, you could write an extension method:

public static bool ValidateJSON(this string s)
{
    try
    {
        JToken.Parse(s);
        return true;
    }
    catch (JsonReaderException ex)
    {
        Trace.WriteLine(ex);
        return false;
    }
}

Which can then be used like this:

if(stringObject.ValidateJSON())
{
    // Valid JSON!
}
  • 1
    JToken.Parse(s); returns true even if JToken.Parse(123); – Make Makeluv Aug 31 '16 at 15:25
  • 1
    Return true for this invalid JSON: {A:{"B": 1}} – Mehdi Dehghani Dec 15 '16 at 9:54
  • Nice extension method to have :) Though it would probably be better named as "IsValidJson". – Mladen B. Apr 11 at 12:43
7

Just to add something to @Habib's answer, you can also check if given JSON is from a valid type:

public static bool IsValidJson<T>(this string strInput)
{
    strInput = strInput.Trim();
    if ((strInput.StartsWith("{") && strInput.EndsWith("}")) || //For object
        (strInput.StartsWith("[") && strInput.EndsWith("]"))) //For array
    {
        try
        {
            var obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(strInput);
            return true;
        }
        catch // not valid
        {             
            return false;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}
5

I found that JToken.Parse incorrectly parses invalid JSON such as the following:

{
"Id" : , 
"Status" : 2
}

Paste the JSON string into http://jsonlint.com/ - it is invalid.

So I use:

 public static bool IsValidJson(this string input)
        {
            input = input.Trim();
            if ((input.StartsWith("{") && input.EndsWith("}")) || //For object
                (input.StartsWith("[") && input.EndsWith("]"))) //For array
            {
                try
                {
                    //parse the input into a JObject
                    var jObject = JObject.Parse(input);

                    foreach(var jo in jObject)
                    {
                        string name = jo.Key;
                        JToken value = jo.Value;

                        //if the element has a missing value, it will be Undefined - this is invalid
                        if (value.Type == JTokenType.Undefined)
                        {
                            return false;
                        }
                    }
                }
                catch (JsonReaderException jex)
                {
                    //Exception in parsing json
                    Console.WriteLine(jex.Message);
                    return false;
                }
                catch (Exception ex) //some other exception
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
                    return false;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }

            return true;
        }
  • Thats not an invalid JSON String ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/ECMA-404.pdf here is the documentation of the JSON Standard ECMA and under Point 5 JSON Values you can see a value can take null as value. So its just a bug in the jsonlint interpreter – Dominik Lemberger Mar 23 '17 at 7:53
  • 3
    Dominik, a JSON value according to my read of the spec you linked must have some valid token, with the literal null text representing a null value. Valid values are "an object, array, number, string, true, false, or null" according to the spec you referenced. AFAICS there is no valid value with no value token. – Kirtlander Nov 7 '17 at 18:36
  • This looks like it will be OK with invalid JSON which looks like this { name : "l am invalid JSON" } – Jon49 Mar 27 at 19:29
2

Regarding Tom Beech's answer; I came up with the following instead:

public bool ValidateJSON(string s)
{
    try
    {
        JToken.Parse(s);
        return true;
    }
    catch (JsonReaderException ex)
    {
        Trace.WriteLine(ex);
        return false;
    }
}

With a usage of the following:

if (ValidateJSON(strMsg))
{
    var newGroup = DeserializeGroup(strMsg);
}
  • This is not novel - you made an extension method not be an extension method. Tom Beech's answer can already achieve what you need (In general, I'd also frown on adding extension methods of this kind on string, but this answer really should either a) not be here or b) say "I used Tom Beech's answer" without the this, i.e. without making it an extension member) - both this answer and the referenced one have identical brevity and weaknesses. If you must make this point, just put a comment on the other answer. – Ruben Bartelink Mar 27 at 3:48
0

This method doesn't require external libraries

using System.Web.Script.Serialization;
bool IsValidJson(string json)
    {
        try {
            var serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            dynamic result = serializer.DeserializeObject(json);
            return true;
        } catch { return false; }
    }

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