83

Often in my inner loops I need to index an array in a "wrap-around" way, so that (for example) if the array size is 100 and my code asks for element -2, it should be given element 98. In many high level languages such as Python, one can do this simply with my_array[index % array_size], but for some reason C's integer arithmetic (usually) rounds toward zero instead of consistently rounding down, and consequently its modulo operator returns a negative result when given a negative first argument.

Often I know that index will not be less than -array_size, and in these cases I just do my_array[(index + array_size) % array_size]. However, sometimes this can't be guaranteed, and for those cases I would like to know the fastest way to implement an always-positive modulo function. There are several "clever" ways to do it without branching, such as

inline int positive_modulo(int i, int n) {
    return (n + (i % n)) % n;
}

or

inline int positive_modulo(int i, int n) {
    return (i % n) + (n * (i < 0));
}

Of course I can profile these to find out which is the fastest on my system, but I can't help worrying that I might have missed a better one, or that what's fast on my machine might be slow on a different one.

So is there a standard way to do this, or some clever trick that I've missed that's likely to be the fastest possible way?

Also, I know it's probably wishful thinking, but if there's a way of doing this that can be auto-vectorised, that would be amazing.

21
  • Are you consistently modding over the same number?
    – Mysticial
    Feb 21, 2013 at 7:59
  • 1
    Then, you'll want to either hard-code the modulus, or put it in as a compile-time constant. You'll get much better performance that way than whatever tricks you can play with the sign.
    – Mysticial
    Feb 21, 2013 at 8:00
  • 2
    Well, modding over a power of two is trivial; you just do & (n-1) regardless of sign.
    – nneonneo
    Feb 21, 2013 at 8:01
  • 3
    I'm surprised no one pointed this out, but in C % isn't modulus, it returns the remainder. Even fmod returns the remainder if you look at the documentation: cplusplus.com/reference/cmath/fmod So I think it's weird to call this positive modulus, since the behavior you're looking for is what modulus is supposed to be: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_arithmetic Mar 21, 2014 at 0:08
  • 1
    With (i % n) + (n * (i < 0)) I'm seeing result n instead of 0 on negative exact multiples, e.g (-3, 3) -> 3. May 16, 2019 at 21:47

9 Answers 9

87

The standard way I learned is

inline int positive_modulo(int i, int n) {
    return (i % n + n) % n;
}

This function is essentially your first variant without the abs (which, in fact, makes it return the wrong result). I wouldn't be surprised if an optimizing compiler could recognize this pattern and compile it to machine code that computes an "unsigned modulo".

Edit:

Moving on to your second variant: First of all, it contains a bug, too -- the n < 0 should be i < 0.

This variant may not look as if it branches, but on a lot of architectures, the i < 0 will compile into a conditional jump. In any case, it will be at least as fast to replace (n * (i < 0)) with i < 0? n: 0, which avoids the multiplication; in addition, it's "cleaner" because it avoids reinterpreting the bool as an int.

As to which of these two variants is faster, that probably depends on the compiler and processor architecture -- time the two variants and see. I don't think there's a faster way than either of these two variants, though.

7
  • Nitpick: It actually won't vectorize because there's generally no SIMD support for modulus.
    – Mysticial
    Feb 21, 2013 at 8:46
  • 1
    Would it be more efficient to factor the n out into a template? In the case that the function cannot be inlined, the compiler may be able to play some tricks to improve performance. Feb 21, 2013 at 9:02
  • Oops, you're right about the abs(), I've edited it out of my question.
    – N. Virgo
    Feb 21, 2013 at 10:32
  • also corrected the typo in the second example. (I really should have tested them first.)
    – N. Virgo
    Feb 22, 2013 at 3:03
  • 1
    Notice that for (-3 mod 3) using (i % n) + (n * (i < 0)) or (i % n) + (i < 0 ? n : 0), the result is 3: (-3 % 3) == 0 and (3 * (-3 < 0)) == 3, probably not the desired result.
    – Qwertie
    Jun 20, 2013 at 22:57
31

Modulo a power of two, the following works (assuming twos complement representation):

return i & (n-1);
9
  • Many thanks! I will leave the question open in case someone has a good answer for the general case, but I will probably end up using this.
    – N. Virgo
    Feb 21, 2013 at 8:03
  • 1
    what is n here? n mod i or i mod n?
    – ixSci
    Feb 21, 2013 at 8:42
  • 1
    As simple as the answer is, I would be very careful. Remember different architectures generally store negative numbers in different ways. Hence bitwise operators on negative numbers cant differ with different compilers and/or architectures.
    – mity
    Feb 21, 2013 at 8:42
  • 2
    i mod n == i & (n-1) when n is a power of two and mod is the aforementioned positive mod. (FYI: modulus is the common mathematical term for the "divisor" when a modulo operation is considered).
    – nneonneo
    Feb 21, 2013 at 9:01
  • 7
    @GrijeshChauhan: The limitations are clearly stated: n must be a power of two and numbers must use twos-complement (pretty much every computer produced in the last 20 years). When else will it fail?
    – nneonneo
    Feb 21, 2013 at 9:03
27

Most of the time, compilers are very good at optimizing your code, so it is usually best to keep your code readable (for both compilers and other developers to know what you are doing).

Since your array size is always positive, I suggest you to define the quotient as unsigned. The compiler will optimize small if/else blocks into conditional instructions which have no branches:

unsigned modulo( int value, unsigned m) {
    int mod = value % (int)m;
    if (mod < 0) {
        mod += m;
    }
    return mod;
}

This creates a very small function without branches:

modulo(int, unsigned int):
        mov     eax, edi
        cdq
        idiv    esi
        add     esi, edx
        mov     eax, edx
        test    edx, edx
        cmovs   eax, esi
        ret

For example modulo(-5, 7) returns 2.

Unfortunately, since the quotient is not known they must perform an integer division, which is a bit slow compared to other integer operations. If you know the sizes of your array are power of two, I recommend keeping these function definitions in a header, so that the compiler can optimize them into a more efficient function. Here is the function unsigned modulo256(int v) { return modulo(v,256); }:

modulo256(int):                          # @modulo256(int)
        mov     edx, edi
        sar     edx, 31
        shr     edx, 24
        lea     eax, [rdi+rdx]
        movzx   eax, al
        sub     eax, edx
        lea     edx, [rax+256]
        test    eax, eax
        cmovs   eax, edx
        ret

See assembly: https://gcc.godbolt.org/z/DG7jMw

See comparison with most voted answer: http://quick-bench.com/oJbVwLr9G5HJb0oRaYpQOCec4E4

Benchmark comparison

Edit: turns out Clang is able to generate a function without any conditional move instructions (which cost more than regular arithmetic operations). This difference is completely negligible in the general case due to the fact that the integral division takes around 70% of the total time.

Basically, Clang shifts value right to extend its sign bit to the whole width of m (that is 0xffffffff when negative and 0 otherwise) which is used to mask the second operand in mod + m.

unsigned modulo (int value, unsigned m) {
    int mod = value % (int)m;
    m &= mod >> std::numeric_limits<int>::digits;
    return mod + m;
}
11
  • Thank you, this is very interesting. Also interesting that specifying 29 gives some saving over the generic function, even if a power of 2 is even faster. I ran the benchmark on g++ also, with similar results. I'm accepting this answer because I think it does actually supersede the information in the other, higher-voted answers.
    – N. Virgo
    Sep 26, 2019 at 15:04
  • 1
    If you want to know the exact methodology for this, there are books/websites that will give you more information about this : for example the PowerPC Compiler Writer's Guide has a section on this at pages 52 to 61, and Matt Godbolt talked about this in his "What has my compiler done for me lately ?" talk, at the 35th minute Nov 10, 2019 at 20:26
  • 1
    Thanks. I've updated the answer to include why not using conditional moves is faster, even though I only see improvements (with GCC) for the constant division and not for the generic case. May 1, 2020 at 10:58
  • 2
    This code is incorrect. It won't work for modulo(-x, x) and returns x in such a case. Aug 3, 2020 at 12:03
  • 1
    You have to righshift mod instead, not value. Aug 3, 2020 at 12:56
9

An old-school way to get the optional addend using twos-complement sign-bit propagation:

int positive_mod(int i, int m)
{
    /* constexpr */ int shift = CHAR_BIT*sizeof i - 1;
    int r = i%m;
    return r+ (r>>shift & m);
}
8
  • Old-school hard to read hack. I like it. Though I wonder if (i>>shift & n) might be faster as the bitshift operation will otherwise have to wait for the modulo operation to finish. Feb 22, 2013 at 22:47
  • It would be faster but it would give incorrect results for e.g. -2 mod 2.
    – jthill
    Feb 23, 2013 at 0:28
  • Shoot, you are right. And now that you mention it, that is true for (i % n) + (n * (i < 0)) as well. Feb 23, 2013 at 10:32
  • Assuming CHAR_BIT is a global contest (of the system?) sizeof of what? I do not understand if it is CHAR_BIT*(sizeof(i)) -1or Aug 31, 2018 at 15:30
  • 1
    @J.Schultke Okay, I changed some names anyway to fix possible confusion, now m is the modulus and r is the result, no what-is-this-number-really n's left.
    – jthill
    Aug 3, 2020 at 19:02
8

Fastest way to get a positive modulo in C/C++

The following fast? - maybe not as fast as others, yet is simple and functionally correct for all1 a,b -- unlike others.

int modulo_Euclidean(int a, int b) {
  int m = a % b;
  if (m < 0) {
    // m += (b < 0) ? -b : b; // avoid this form: -b is UB when b == INT_MIN
    m = (b < 0) ? m - b : m + b;
  }
  return m;
}

Various other answers have mod(a,b) weaknesses especially when b < 0.

See Euclidean division for ideas about b < 0


inline int positive_modulo(int i, int n) {
    return (i % n + n) % n;
}

Fails when i % n + n overflows (think large i, n) - Undefined behavior.


return i & (n-1);

Relies on n as a power of two. (Fair that the answer does mention this.)


int positive_mod(int i, int n)
{
    /* constexpr */ int shift = CHAR_BIT*sizeof i - 1;
    int m = i%n;
    return m+ (m>>shift & n);
}

Often fails when n < 0. e, g, positive_mod(-2,-3) --> -5


int32_t positive_modulo(int32_t number, int32_t modulo) {
    return (number + ((int64_t)modulo << 32)) % modulo;
}

Obliges using 2 integer widths. (Fair that the answer does mention this.)
Fails with modulo < 0. positive_modulo(2, -3) --> -1.


inline int positive_modulo(int i, int n) {
    int tmp = i % n;
    return tmp ? i >= 0 ? tmp : tmp + n : 0;
}

Often fails when n < 0. e, g, positive_modulo(-2,-3) --> -5


1 Exceptions: In C, a%b is not defined when a/b overflows as in a/0 or INT_MIN/-1.

4
  • 1
    Explaining the failure of the other answers is helpful.
    – NateS
    Jan 13, 2020 at 12:05
  • Can you elaborate a bit on why += results in UB ?
    – cassepipe
    Jun 30, 2021 at 17:18
  • 1
    @cassepipe += is fine, but -b when b == INT_MAN is UB. Note added to answer. Jun 30, 2021 at 18:11
  • @chux-ReinstateMonica Thanks ! Indeed INT_MIN has no positive equivalent in the int range as it would be above INT_MAX by one. And this is because of en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two%27s_complement (Putting that there for beginners such as myself not so long ago)
    – cassepipe
    Jun 30, 2021 at 18:21
3

If you can afford to promote to a larger type (and do your modulo on the larger type), this code does a single modulo and no if:

int32_t positive_modulo(int32_t number, int32_t modulo) {
    return (number + ((int64_t)modulo << 32)) % modulo;
}
3

If you want to avoid all conditional paths (including the conditional move generated above, (For example if you need this code to vectorize, or to run in constant time), You can use the sign bit as a mask:

unsigned modulo(int value, unsigned m) {
  int shift_width = sizeof(int) * 8 - 1;
  int tweak = (value >> shift_width);
  int mod = ((value - tweak) % (int) m) + tweak;
  mod += (tweak & m);
  return mod;
}

Here are the quickbench results You can see that on gcc it's better in the generic case. For clang it's the same speed in the generic case, because clang generates the branch free code in the generic case. The technique is useful regardless, because the compiler can't always be relied on to produce the particular optimization, and you may have to roll it by hand for vector code.

7
  • 1
    I know the OP doesn't need constant time, as it's for an array lookup, but this has been linked to as the fast way to compute modulo, which someone may need to do in constant time, so I figured it was worth mentioning.
    – Kyle Butt
    Apr 27, 2020 at 21:54
  • 1
    Your godbolt link has a mistake because you are performing unsigned division instead of signed (you are missing the cast). Apr 30, 2020 at 17:25
  • Intel doesn't currently support integer divison as a vector unit, and neither does Arm, but they aren't the only CPUs with vector units, and they may get integer division in the future.
    – Kyle Butt
    Apr 30, 2020 at 17:53
  • 1
    I've given a small look and the quick bench results show the same performance when m is not a constant (just ran your link with clearing the cached results). GCC reports the same assembly if you code it like m &= value < 0? UINT_MAX : 0u; mod += m; which is much more readable than using the shift right (the right shift is just adding an all 1s bitmask when the sign bit is set). The fact that Clang does the thing right proves even further than letting the compiler do the dirty work is usually a good idea. May 1, 2020 at 10:35
  • If you need it to run in constant time, it's a bad idea to rely on the compiler.
    – Kyle Butt
    May 1, 2020 at 18:17
2

You can as well do array[(i+array_size*N) % array_size], where N is large enough integer to guarantee positive argument, but small enough for not to overflow.

When the array_size is constant, there are techniques to calculate the modulus without division. Besides of power of two approach, one can calculate a weighted sum of bitgroups multiplied by the 2^i % n, where i is the least significant bit in each group:

e.g. 32-bit integer 0xaabbccdd % 100 = dd + cc*[2]56 + bb*[655]36 + aa*[167772]16, having the maximum range of (1+56+36+16)*255 = 27795. With repeated applications and different subdivision one can reduce the operation to few conditional subtractions.

Common practises also include approximation of division with reciprocal of 2^32 / n, which usually can handle reasonably large range of arguments.

 i - ((i * 655)>>16)*100; // (gives 100*n % 100 == 100 requiring adjusting...)
1

Your second example is better than the first. A multiplication is a more complex operation than an if/else operation, so use this:

inline int positive_modulo(int i, int n) {
    int tmp = i % n;
    return tmp ? i >= 0 ? tmp : tmp + n : 0;
}
3
  • 1) you're right, I edited the code. 2) if i is negative the return is a negative, i%n returns a negative number, for example -102%100 returns -2 so u just add n to the result
    – SkYWAGz
    Sep 16, 2015 at 15:58
  • 1) Perhaps simply return tmp < 0 ? tmp + n : tmp;. 2) This answer has an advantage over highly rated one in that it never overflows. Sep 16, 2015 at 16:26
  • Re-state as "it" was unclear: This answer never overflows. (advantage) (if n > 0). The other answer may overflow. (weakness). Sep 16, 2015 at 17:08

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