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This question already has an answer here:

I want to format a list of floating-point numbers with at most, say, 2 decimal places. But, I don't want trailing zeros, and I don't want trailing decimal points.

So, for example, 4.001 => 4, 4.797 => 4.8, 8.992 => 8.99, 13.577 => 13.58.

The simple solution is ('%.2f' % f).rstrip('.0')('%.2f' % f).rstrip('0').rstrip('.'). But, that looks rather ugly and seems fragile. Any nicer solutions, maybe with some magical format flags?

marked as duplicate by Jon Clements, Kevin, Undo, chopper, Frank V Mar 27 '14 at 19:28

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  • Am I missing the point here, or what about the round() function: docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#round – TerryA Feb 21 '13 at 8:43
  • Though, I have to say, I'm not a huge fan of solutions that involve round simply because I am nervous I'll get 1.1000000000009962 as an output someday. – nneonneo Feb 21 '13 at 8:43
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    Aarrgh, it's not a duplicate! I don't want trailing .0. The other question permits that. – nneonneo Feb 21 '13 at 8:47
  • @nneonneo I believe int() will get rid of the .0, but use in caution as it will get rid of any other decimal places (so perhaps an if/else statement?) – TerryA Feb 21 '13 at 8:49
  • @Haidro: ...now that's just getting icky. I was hoping I didn't need an if/else, or I would just condition on the '.%2f' % f or something. (Still weirdly difficult to have a nice solution...I'm really used to things being really easy in Python) – nneonneo Feb 21 '13 at 8:50
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You need to separate the 0 and the . stripping; that way you won't ever strip away the natural 0.

Alternatively, use the format() function, but that really comes down to the same thing:

format(f, '.2f').rstrip('0').rstrip('.')

Some tests:

>>> def formatted(f): return format(f, '.2f').rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
... 
>>> formatted(0.0)
'0'
>>> formatted(4.797)
'4.8'
>>> formatted(4.001)
'4'
>>> formatted(13.577)
'13.58'
>>> formatted(0.000000000000000000001)
'0'
>>> formatted(10000000000)
'10000000000'
  • +1: I guess this is the conclusion I came to independently. I was hoping there was a nicer solution, but there simply might not be one. Thanks! – nneonneo Feb 21 '13 at 11:44
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The g formatter limits the output to n significant digits, dropping trailing zeroes:

>>> "{:.3g}".format(1.234)
'1.23'
>>> "{:.3g}".format(1.2)
'1.2'
>>> "{:.3g}".format(1)
'1'
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    You can use the format() function if all you have is one {} template. e.g. format(f, '.3g'). This even works correctly for 0. – Martijn Pieters Feb 21 '13 at 11:32
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    Almost...except that it prints at most three digits, rather than at most two decimal places. (Example: '{:.3g}'.format(13.468) prints 13.5 rather than 13.47) – nneonneo Feb 21 '13 at 11:34
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    Ah, and it also does the wrong thing when exponents are involved. – Martijn Pieters Feb 21 '13 at 11:36
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    OK, I guess you could do "{0:.{1}g}".format(13.468, 2+len(str(int(13.468)))), but that's not really Pythonic, I guess :) – Tim Pietzcker Feb 21 '13 at 11:56
5

In general working with String[s] can be slow. However, this is another solution:

>>> from decimal import Decimal
>>> precision = Decimal('.00')
>>> Decimal('4.001').quantize(precision).normalize()
Decimal('4')
>>> Decimal('4.797').quantize(precision).normalize()
Decimal('4.8')
>>> Decimal('8.992').quantize(precision).normalize()
Decimal('8.99')
>>> Decimal('13.577').quantize(precision).normalize()
Decimal('13.58')

You may find more info here: http://docs.python.org/2/library/decimal.html

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