1

we are migrating over to oracle from sql server side.

on sqlserver we used to have a view like the following

create view blah
AS 
Select column1, 
       column2
 FROM  blah;

but doing this on oracle produces circular view error.

is this not allowed on oracle side?

4
  • 2
    I am confused. Why are you doing this and, logically, how would it work?
    – Rob
    Oct 1, 2009 at 2:47
  • 2
    Agreed, Rob. Just in case I had missed something I checked it in SQL server and it detects the circular reference as well.
    – mjv
    Oct 1, 2009 at 2:51
  • Fascinating, did you have a table and a view in sql server with a name that differs only in the use of uppercase/lowercase? So blah and Blah? I don't know whether this is possible in sql server or not. Just guessing. You can do create or replace view "blah" ... to make Oracle case-aware.
    – tuinstoel
    Oct 1, 2009 at 19:56
  • This is a very useful style when you need to deal with any kind of ... cascading data, a table representing tree data, such as an EMPLOYEE table with a MANAGERID column that refers back to the PK of the same table. ORACLE does support this, though it's a bit more fragile. See my answer below.
    – eidylon
    Feb 20, 2014 at 19:24

4 Answers 4

5

You cannot have a view reference itself. It logically does not make sense. A view is essentially a cached query whose results are displayed as a table. How can a query refer to itself?

Indeed, circular view definitions are not allowed in Oracle. If you have a circular view definition, then you likely have a bug in your database code that should be addressed. Perhaps the translation from SQL server to Oracle was flawed and accidentally introduced this circular definition?

3
  • Actually, it DOES make sense and there are use-cases for wanting a view to be self-referential. In SQL Server you can do self-referencing CTEs, (apparently in ORACLE too, but you need to spell out all the columns explicitly). Examples are any kind of tree data... where records in a table refer back to the PK of other records in the same table. Maybe you want to find out the depth of a row in a cascading table, for example. ...
    – eidylon
    Feb 20, 2014 at 19:07
  • ... (continued) The usual example is wanting to return an employee's name together with his supervisor's name in a single query. Good reference with examples.
    – eidylon
    Feb 20, 2014 at 19:07
  • (have since tried it in ORACLE with the columns of the CTE explicitly stated, and it works, but it makes the view very fragile to underlying table changes).
    – eidylon
    Feb 20, 2014 at 19:22
2

You can actually do this in ORACLE, but it is more fragile, as you need to explicitly list the output columns of your CTE. So if you change the tables, you need to manually update the CTE.

Here is an example from our db, showing how to calculate the hierarchical depth of the a record...

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW deploy.PHARMACYDISPENSE_EX
AS 
   WITH SRC (
        PDID, WAREID, GCN_SEQNO, QTY, UOFM, XACTDTTM, CREATEDON, PROCESSEDON, 
        XACTTYPE, OPDID, CLOSEDON, BYPASSEDON, BYPASSEDBY, ITEMNO, LOTNO, 
        EXP_DATE, VOLUMETYPE, POTYPE, DEPTH
   ) AS (
        SELECT D.PDID, D.WAREID, D.GCN_SEQNO, D.QTY, D.UOFM, D.XACTDTTM, 
               D.CREATEDON, D.PROCESSEDON, D.XACTTYPE, D.OPDID, D.CLOSEDON, 
               D.BYPASSEDON, D.BYPASSEDBY, D.ITEMNO, D.LOTNO, D.EXP_DATE, 
               D.VOLUMETYPE, D.POTYPE, 0 FROM deploy.PHARMACYDISPENSE D 
        WHERE OPDID IS NULL
        UNION ALL
        SELECT D.PDID, D.WAREID, D.GCN_SEQNO, D.QTY, D.UOFM, D.XACTDTTM, 
               D.CREATEDON, D.PROCESSEDON, D.XACTTYPE, D.OPDID, D.CLOSEDON, 
               D.BYPASSEDON, D.BYPASSEDBY, D.ITEMNO, D.LOTNO, D.EXP_DATE, 
               D.VOLUMETYPE, D.POTYPE, (S.DEPTH + 1) 
        FROM deploy.PHARMACYDISPENSE D JOIN SRC S ON S.PDID = D.OPDID
)
SELECT PD.*
FROM SRC PD;

The important part here is the WITH SRC (<output column list>) AS .... You need that output column list. So it is possible, and does work, it just takes a bit more code than in SQL Server.

7
  • I'm confused. Do you claim that you cannot do this in SQL-Server? Feb 24, 2014 at 16:45
  • Huh? No, this can be done in Sql Server, and quite easily. This is where the original questioner was coming from. He was trying to port this functionality over to ORACLE. The other two answers both say this cannot be done in ORACLE, when in fact it can, ... it is just slightly less easy than in Sql Server.
    – eidylon
    Feb 24, 2014 at 16:47
  • They say it cannot be done because the posted question does not mention recursive views at all. Feb 24, 2014 at 16:50
  • That is exactly what his question is, based on the code, is a recursive view. I'm not understanding what you mean.
    – eidylon
    Feb 24, 2014 at 16:55
  • Well, without UNION ALL in the code, that is just a guess. It could be a correct guess. What you say about Oracle requiring the column list is correct, I agree. Feb 24, 2014 at 16:59
0

Your example is incomplete - well at least doesn't show the pertinent parts.:


-- create a table
CREATE TABLE Scrap
(fieldName  VARCHAR2(20));
-- create a view
CREATE VIEW ScrapVW1
AS
SELECT * FROM Scrap;
-- create a second view that uses the first view
CREATE VIEW ScrapVW2
AS
SELECT * FROM Scrap
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM ScrapVW1;
-- recreate the first view that references the 2nd view which contains a reference to itself
CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW SCRAP_VW1
AS
SELECT * FROM ScrapVW2;

Gives a circular reference error when you try to recreate ScrapVW1. I would guess you have some unintentional name collision going on in your conversion. If it's quite complex I'd get rid of the 'CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW' syntax and just use CREATE VIEW which would then give you 'ORA-00955 Name already used' error.

0

Oracle deals with Hierarchical problems different than SQL apparently. Instead of self referring view, you can use connect by clause

    SELECT employee_id, last_name, manager_id
   FROM employees
   CONNECT BY PRIOR employee_id = manager_id;

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