97

I'm surprised not to be able to find this question here already.

I have a date time var and I want to convert it to a string so that I can append it to another string. I want it in a format that can be converted easily back to a date time.

How can I do this?

(I want the date part and the time part.)

2
  • 1
    @TonyHopkinson I got lots of hits too but they all seemed to be converting the other way. Or wanting something more complicated.
    – cja
    Feb 22 '13 at 17:31
  • 4
    Type Convert, double-click to highlight, press Shift+F1... always first line of defense. Feb 22 '13 at 18:16

10 Answers 10

167

The following query will get the current datetime and convert into string. with the following format
yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss(24h)

SELECT convert(varchar(25), getdate(), 120) 
4
  • 55
    I still can't get over the fact that you have to pass arbitrary numbers to get the right format
    – cja
    Dec 31 '13 at 12:41
  • 5
    @cja I totally share your surprise. I want to provide a string, like yyddss to get the exact format I want. There's probably a technical or historical reason to this. But still - very surpriannoying. Dec 20 '15 at 13:37
  • 3
    Thanks for the quick fix but in your answer you are coding the months as minutes, yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss NOT yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss
    – Tom Martin
    Feb 23 '17 at 11:39
  • 1
    Though this is old, I just ran into this thread. When using DateTimeOffSet, be sure to adjust the varchar length to what you want your outcome to look like. For me, I didn't want the timezone so I had to use SELECT convert(varchar(19), sysdatetimeoffset(), 120)
    – RoLYroLLs
    Mar 16 '17 at 15:46
31

There are many different ways to convert a datetime to a string. Here is one way:

SELECT convert(varchar(25), getdate(), 121)  – yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.mmm

See Demo

Here is a website that has a list of all of the conversions:

How to Format datetime & date in SQL Server

8

You can use the convert statement in Microsoft SQL Server to convert a date to a string. An example of the syntax used would be:

SELECT convert(varchar(20), getdate(), 120)

The above would return the current date and time in a string with the format of YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS in 24 hour clock.

You can change the number at the end of the statement to one of many which will change the returned strings format. A list of these codes can be found on the MSDN in the CAST and CONVERT reference section.

8

There are 3 different methods depending on what I is my requirement and which version I am using.

Here are the methods..

1) Using Convert

DECLARE @DateTime DATETIME = GETDATE();
--Using Convert
SELECT
    CONVERT(NVARCHAR, @DateTime,120) AS 'myDateTime'
    ,CONVERT(NVARCHAR(10), @DateTime, 120) AS 'myDate'
    ,RIGHT(CONVERT(NVARCHAR, @DateTime, 120),8) AS 'myTime'

2) Using Cast (SQL Server 2008 and beyond)

SELECT
    CAST(@DateTime AS DATETIME2) AS 'myDateTime'
    ,CAST(@DateTime AS DATETIME2(3)) AS 'myDateTimeWithPrecision'
    ,CAST(@DateTime AS DATE) AS 'myDate'
    ,CAST(@DateTime AS TIME) AS 'myTime'
    ,CAST(@DateTime AS TIME(3)) AS 'myTimeWithPrecision'

3) Using Fixed-length character data type

DECLARE @myDateTime NVARCHAR(20) = CONVERT(NVARCHAR, @DateTime, 120);
DECLARE @myDate NVARCHAR(10) = CONVERT(NVARCHAR, @DateTime, 120);

SELECT
    @myDateTime AS 'myDateTime'
    ,@myDate AS 'myDate'
8

In addition to the CAST and CONVERT functions in the previous answers, if you are using SQL Server 2012 and above you use the FORMAT function to convert a DATETIME based type to a string.

To convert back, use the opposite PARSE or TRYPARSE functions.

The formatting styles are based on .NET (similar to the string formatting options of the ToString() method) and has the advantage of being culture aware. eg.

DECLARE @DateTime DATETIME2 = SYSDATETIME();
DECLARE @StringResult1 NVARCHAR(100) = FORMAT(@DateTime, 'g') --without culture
DECLARE @StringResult2 NVARCHAR(100) = FORMAT(@DateTime, 'g', 'en-gb') 
SELECT @DateTime
SELECT @StringResult1, @StringResult2
SELECT PARSE(@StringResult1 AS DATETIME2)
SELECT PARSE(@StringResult2 AS DATETIME2 USING 'en-gb')

Results:

2015-06-17 06:20:09.1320951
6/17/2015 6:20 AM
17/06/2015 06:20
2015-06-17 06:20:00.0000000
2015-06-17 06:20:00.0000000
4
  • 1
    Am I missing something or is the OPs problem solved with FORMAT(<date var>, 'dd MMMM yyyy HH:mm:ss') or whatever custom date format you need?!
    – Grim
    Mar 2 '18 at 17:55
  • 1
    @Grim you can do that as well. From the docs The format argument must contain a valid .NET Framework format string, either as a standard format string (for example, "C" or "D"), or as a pattern of custom characters for dates and numeric values (for example, "MMMM DD, yyyy (dddd)")
    – g2server
    Mar 2 '18 at 22:06
  • 1
    I think you're actually working too hard here. SQL Server has implicit string equivalents for DATETIME2. What you're actually doing here is utilizing the implicit conversion and then formatting the resulting string, not the datetime. Jan 23 '19 at 20:19
  • 1
    @JamieMarshall more or less. MSDN suggests: Use the FORMAT function for locale-aware formatting of date/time and number values as strings. For general data type conversions, use CAST or CONVERT.
    – g2server
    Jan 26 '19 at 8:19
3
SELECT CONVERT(varchar, @datetime, 103) --for UK Date format 'DD/MM/YYYY'

101 - US - MM/DD/YYYY

108 - Time - HH:MI:SS

112 - Date - YYYYMMDD

121 - ODBC - YYYY-MM-DD HH:MI:SS.FFF

20 - ODBC - YYYY-MM-DD HH:MI:SS

2

Check CAST and CONVERT syntax of t-sql:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187928.aspx

2

Try below :

DECLARE @myDateTime DATETIME
SET @myDateTime = '2013-02-02'

-- Convert to string now
SELECT LEFT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, @myDateTime, 120), 10)
2
  • 2
    Good !! Do we need to write LEFT as well ?
    – Gaurav123
    Feb 22 '13 at 18:11
  • 1
    Takes 10 first chars, so if you do need it if you just want the date.
    – ram4nd
    Feb 5 '19 at 11:37
2

This has been answered by a lot of people, but I feel like the simplest solution has been left out.

SQL SERVER (I believe its 2012+) has implicit string equivalents for DATETIME2 as shown here

Look at the section on "Supported string literal formats for datetime2"

To answer the OPs question explicitly:

DECLARE @myVar NCHAR(32)
DECLARE @myDt DATETIME2
SELECT @myVar = @GETDATE()
SELECT @myDt = @myVar
PRINT(@myVar)
PRINT(@myDt)

output:

Jan 23 2019 12:24PM             
2019-01-23 12:24:00.0000000

Note: The first variable (myVar) is actually holding the value '2019-01-23 12:24:00.0000000' as well. It just gets formatted to Jan 23 2019 12:24PM due to default formatting set for SQL SERVER that gets called on when you use PRINT. Don't get tripped up here by that, the actual string in (myVer) = '2019-01-23 12:24:00.0000000'

0

In the stored procedure for me works something like this.

convert(varchar(10), StartingDate) AS 'StartingDate'

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