10

We have a scenario where tasks submitted to ThreadPoolExecutor are long running. When the thread pool is started we start it with core pool size = 5, max pool size = 20 and queue size of 10. In our application around 10 tasks get submitted. Most of the time these tasks run for few mins/hrs and then complete. However there was a situation when all of the 5 tasks got hanged on I/O. As a result my core pool size reached it max, but my Threadpoolexecutor queue was not full. So the additional 5 tasks never got a chance to run. Please do suggest how we can handle such scenario? Is having a smaller queue better option in such situation? What would be an optimum queue size while initializing threadPool?

Also regarding the hanged tasks, is there any way we can pull out the threads out of the Threadpool? In that case at least other tasks would get a chance to run.

  • When you submit() a task, you are returned a Future object. You can use that future object to cancel execution. – Aurand Feb 22 '13 at 20:14
  • Yes we are doing that using future.cancel. However it is not guaranteed that tasks would get cancelled esp when waiting on I/O. – user1269597 Feb 22 '13 at 21:08
  • you can set the timeout value while getting value using Future object as future.get(5000,TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS) and write this within try catch block. – Vishal K Feb 22 '13 at 21:59
9

The overall situation is like this:

core pool size = 5,
max pool size = 20 and 
queue size of 10

10 tasks are submitted. Out of which

  1. 5 Tasks hanged on I/O => all threads of core pool size are occupied. And hence there is no idle thread.
  2. 5 Tasks are remained . These 5 threads are enqueued to queue since there is no idle thread and the queue can accommodate 10 tasks. These enqueued tasks will not execute until either the queue is full or any of the threads in core pool is free.

Hence, Your Program is hanged .

To know more about dynamics of ThreadPoolExecutor watch here . The notable points of this doc is as follows:

  • If fewer than corePoolSize threads are running, the Executor always prefers adding a new thread rather than queuing.
  • If corePoolSize or more threads are running, the Executor always prefers queuing a request rather than adding a new thread.
  • If a request cannot be queued, a new thread is created unless this would exceed maximumPoolSize, in which case, the task will be rejected.

EDIT
If you wish to increase core pool size then you can use setCorePoolSize(int corePoolSize) . If you increase the corepoolsize then new threads will, if needed, be started to execute any queued tasks.

  • Sure, you can increase the corePoolSize, but still will face the possibility that all tasks hang and block the Executor's threads – Megan D Sep 28 '18 at 11:39
8

The Javadocs for ThreadPoolExecutor states:

Any BlockingQueue may be used to transfer and hold submitted tasks. The use of this queue interacts with pool sizing:

  • If fewer than corePoolSize threads are running, the Executor always prefers adding a new thread rather than queuing.
  • If corePoolSize or more threads are running, the Executor always prefers queuing a request rather than adding a new thread.
  • If a request cannot be queued, a new thread is created unless this would exceed maximumPoolSize, in which case, the task will be rejected.

Unless you exceed your queue size after 5 threads are "hanging", you're not going to get more threads.

The real answer is: fix the problem that's causing your threads to hang. Otherwise you're going to have to implement some scheme that uses the Futures returned by submit() to cancel threads if they are running too long.

  • I agree. We are trying to avoid hanging of threads as much as possible. But in production scenario, there is still a very low chance that threads hang as its waiting on some other system/app. In that case, the scenario which I observed would completely stop my whole application. – user1269597 Feb 22 '13 at 21:12
  • Correct. Which is why you need to fix that problem. There is no reason to have code that allows them to "hang" in the first place. – Brian Roach Feb 22 '13 at 22:49
1

I think another approach would be to set the corePoolSize based on the the number of tasks waiting in the queue. One can control the corePoolSize by using setCorePoolSize. A sample monitor thread can control you threadPoolExecutor. You can also improve this monitor to adjust the degree of parallelism.

    public class ExecutorMonitor extends Thread{

            ThreadPoolExecutor executor = null;
            int initialCorePoolSize;
            public ExecutorMonitor(ThreadPoolExecutor executor)
            {
                this.executor = executor;
                this.initialCorePoolSize = executor.getCorePoolSize();
            }
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                while (true)
                {   
                    try {
                        Thread.sleep(5000);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                    if (executor.getQueue().size() > 0)
                    {
                        if(executor.getActiveCount() < executor.getMaximumPoolSize())
                            executor.setCorePoolSize(executor.getCorePoolSize() + 1);
                    }
                    if (executor.getQueue().size() == 0)
                    {
                        if(executor.getCorePoolSize() > initialCorePoolSize)
                            executor.setCorePoolSize(executor.getCorePoolSize() -1);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
  • Does dynamically increasing corePoolSize will create new thread and assign queued task to this new thread? – Nishat Dec 29 '16 at 11:18
  • @Nishat Yes according do java doc: setCorePoolSize(int) – celik Aug 24 '17 at 20:12
0

The "variable" sized thread pool feature in the jdk is a bit tricky. Basically, the setup you are using won't work very well for the reasons you outlined. When i want a variable size thread pool, i typically use this setup:

   ThreadPoolExecutor executor = new ThreadPoolExecutor(maxPoolSize, maxPoolSize,
                                                         DEFAULT_THREAD_TIMEOUT, DEFAULT_THREAD_TIMEOUT_UNIT,
                                                         new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>(),
                                                         threadFactory);
    executor.allowCoreThreadTimeOut(true);

this will create a variable sized thread pool which will vary between 1 and maxPoolSize threads. since the core size is the same as the max size, the pool will always prefer adding threads to queuing, thus you will never backup your queue until the number of threads is maxed out.

UPDATE: As for your hanging tasks problem, if there is an upper limit on the length of a task, you could have a separate manager track the outstanding Future's and cancel them if they are over the max running time. this, of course, assumes your tasks are interruptible.

  • Worth noting is that without fixing his actual problem ... this is going to keep creating threads until it hits max (or he gets an OOM error before that, of course). It's more a bandaid than a solution. – Brian Roach Feb 22 '13 at 20:27
  • @BrianRoach - how is this a bandaid solution? – jtahlborn Feb 22 '13 at 20:34
  • Because exactly of what I just said in my comment? In a long running process he will run out of threads or memory because he has tasks that are hanging. Fixing the real problem (his threads hanging on I/O) eliminates any need to change his current setup. The whole point of using an executor instead of just spawning threads is to control the number of threads (and manage them). – Brian Roach Feb 22 '13 at 20:38
  • 1
    @BrianRoach - ah, you're saying it is a bandaid for the OP because the hanging processes is the real problem. got it, couldn't agree more! – jtahlborn Feb 22 '13 at 20:45
  • executor.allowCoreThreadTimeOut(true); will never work unless the entire pool has no tasks at all (totally idle) and then all threads will go bust. The inherent problem is caused by the queue strategy in LinkedBlockingQueue as the threads will queue on tasks (more like on the Lock/Condition) and be considered live as long as there is at least one task in DEFAULT_THREAD_TIMEOUT period. – bestsss Oct 27 '14 at 10:46
0

The fundamental problem is that the user is really getting CORE_POOL_SIZE threads with unlimited Queue scenario. As such if there are 5 threads in core pool that's all he can ever use, max size does nothing to help. While reducing the time of thread execution is advisable in all cases, in production scenario we cannot often control how third party services will behave and as such the solution would be to increase core pool size to be equal to max pool size or limit the queue size.

-4

i guess the best solution would be override the execute method of ThreadPoolExecutor and introduce the changes in that.

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