10

I have two python lists:

a = [('when', 3), ('why', 4), ('throw', 9), ('send', 15), ('you', 1)]

b = ['the', 'when', 'send', 'we', 'us']

I need to filter out all the elements from a that are similar to those in b. Like in this case, I should get:

c = [('why', 4), ('throw', 9), ('you', 1)]

What should be the most effective way?

2
  • Why not use the method intersection? It works off sets but you can probably make it work better ;) Feb 23, 2013 at 9:34
  • Why is this question tagged with numpy? Do you need a numpy solution?
    – bmu
    Feb 24, 2013 at 10:12

7 Answers 7

11

A list comprehension will work.

a = [('when', 3), ('why', 4), ('throw', 9), ('send', 15), ('you', 1)]
b = ['the', 'when', 'send', 'we', 'us']
filtered = [i for i in a if not i[0] in b]

>>>print(filtered)
[('why', 4), ('throw', 9), ('you', 1)]
2
  • this is a much elegant way of doing it while keeping the lists as lists, and not treating them as dicts...thank you for the help. Feb 23, 2013 at 11:43
  • You should convert b to a set if you are using the in operator. It changes the lookup time from linear to constant, which will make a huge difference when b is a long list. So, c = set(b) and then filtered = [i for i in a if not i[0] in c]. Note that b became c in the last line. Even on this short list with 5 items, it results in a 25% speed improvement for me. With a longer list (100 items in b), it results in a 90% speed improvement.
    – Carl
    Apr 17, 2020 at 11:44
5

A list comprehension should work:

c = [item for item in a if item[0] not in b]

Or with a dictionary comprehension:

d = dict(a)
c = {key: value for key in d.iteritems() if key not in b}
1
  • Did you want {key: value for key, value in d.iteritems() if key not in b}?
    – Eric
    Feb 23, 2013 at 9:42
2

in is nice, but you should use sets at least for b. If you have numpy, you could also try np.in1d of course, but if it is faster or not, you should probably try.

# ruthless copy, but use the set...
b = set(b)
filtered = [i for i in a if not i[0] in b]

# with numpy (note if you create the array like this, you must already put
# the maximum string length, here 10), otherwise, just use an object array.
# its slower (likely not worth it), but safe.
a = np.array(a, dtype=[('key', 's10'), ('val', int)])
b = np.asarray(b)

mask = ~np.in1d(a['key'], b)
filtered = a[mask]

Sets also have have the methods difference, etc. which probably are not to useful here, but in general probably are.

1
  • +1 for numpy. Didn't saw your answer before posting my answer. in1d is faster than the list comprehension for larger data sets by a factor of 2.
    – bmu
    Feb 24, 2013 at 10:41
2

As this is tagged with numpy, here is a numpy solution using numpy.in1d benchmarked against the list comprehension:

In [1]: a = [('when', 3), ('why', 4), ('throw', 9), ('send', 15), ('you', 1)]

In [2]: b = ['the', 'when', 'send', 'we', 'us']

In [3]: a_ar = np.array(a, dtype=[('string','|S5'), ('number',float)])

In [4]: b_ar = np.array(b)

In [5]: %timeit filtered = [i for i in a if not i[0] in b]
1000000 loops, best of 3: 778 ns per loop

In [6]: %timeit filtered = a_ar[-np.in1d(a_ar['string'], b_ar)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 31.4 us per loop

So for 5 records the list comprehension is faster.

However for large data sets the numpy solution is twice as fast as the list comprehension:

In [7]: a = a * 1000

In [8]: a_ar = np.array(a, dtype=[('string','|S5'), ('number',float)])

In [9]: %timeit filtered = [i for i in a if not i[0] in b]
1000 loops, best of 3: 647 us per loop

In [10]: %timeit filtered = a_ar[-np.in1d(a_ar['string'], b_ar)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 302 us per loop
0

Try this :

a = [('when', 3), ('why', 4), ('throw', 9), ('send', 15), ('you', 1)]

b = ['the', 'when', 'send', 'we', 'us']

c=[]

for x in a:
    if x[0] not in b:
        c.append(x)
print c

Demo: http://ideone.com/zW7mzY

5
  • Backwards: the OP wants c to contain the things not in b
    – Eric
    Feb 23, 2013 at 9:37
  • 1
    This seems to be the "c++ way", not the "python way" ;)
    – yo'
    Feb 23, 2013 at 9:37
  • @tohecz c++ doesn't support in operator.
    – Arpit
    Feb 23, 2013 at 9:40
  • @Arpit No, but essentially uses loops for container manipulations, which Python essentially ought not to.
    – yo'
    Feb 23, 2013 at 9:53
  • Im still rooting for intersection! :] Feb 23, 2013 at 9:58
0

Easy way

a = [('when', 3), ('why', 4), ('throw', 9), ('send', 15), ('you', 1)]
b = ['the', 'when', 'send', 'we', 'us']
c=[] # a list to store the required tuples 
#compare the first element of each tuple in with an element in b
for i in a:
    if i[0] not in b:
        c.append(i)
print(c)
-1

Use filter:

c = filter(lambda (x, y): False if x in b else True, a)
11
  • -1: If you're using False if .. else True or True if ... else False then you're doing it wrong
    – Eric
    Feb 23, 2013 at 9:36
  • Wrong according to a certain "Python style", or wrong due to some other reason? Feb 23, 2013 at 11:22
  • 1
    X in Y itself is a boolean statement in python
    – thkang
    Feb 23, 2013 at 11:35
  • 2
    @RahulBanerjee False if ... else True is needlessly complex and hard to read - just do lambda (x, y): x not in b. Also, this causes a syntax error in Python 3 - you would have to do lambda x: x[0] not in b because the form of argument unpacking you use is no longer part of the language.
    – lvc
    Feb 23, 2013 at 11:39
  • 1
    Part of the problem here is that filter(lambda:... is inherently hard to read (vs, say, a filtered comprehension). Presumably, you prefer your notation because it includes an if.
    – Eric
    Feb 24, 2013 at 1:26

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