147

I have a table of students:

id | age
--------
0  | 25
1  | 25
2  | 23

I want to query for all students, and an additional column that counts how many students are of the same age:

id | age | count
----------------
0  | 25  | 2
1  | 25  | 2
2  | 23  | 1

What's the most efficient way of doing this? I fear that a sub-query will be slow, and I'm wondering if there's a better way. Is there?

219

This should work:

SELECT age, count(age) 
  FROM Students 
 GROUP by age

If you need the id as well you could include the above as a sub query like so:

SELECT S.id, S.age, C.cnt
  FROM Students  S
       INNER JOIN (SELECT age, count(age) as cnt
                     FROM Students 
                    GROUP BY age) C ON S.age = C.age
  • 2
    for the second query, the outer select should be on C.cnt because there is no S.cnt, otherwise you get an error: Invalid column name 'cnt' – KM. Oct 1 '09 at 14:00
  • 1
    its giving error for me when I am using select case_id, count(pgm_code) from pgm group by pgm_code; it saying not a group by expression – Rishabh Agarwal Aug 16 '17 at 18:10
25

If you're using Oracle, then a feature called analytics will do the trick. It looks like this:

select id, age, count(*) over (partition by age) from students;

If you aren't using Oracle, then you'll need to join back to the counts:

select a.id, a.age, b.age_count
  from students a
  join (select age, count(*) as age_count
          from students
         group by age) b
    on a.age = b.age
  • 3
    +1, first query works for SQL Server 2005 and up too – KM. Oct 1 '09 at 13:44
  • 2
    FYI, On SQL Server 2005, the second query runs with almost half the execution cost (using SET SHOWPLAN_ALL ON) as the first. I thought the first would have been better, but the old school join beat it. – KM. Oct 1 '09 at 13:53
  • 1
    "old school join beat it" simply because the TOTAL ROW COUNT to be processed is different. In the second query, there's embedded group-by that potentially greatly reduces the number of rows. Try adding DISTINCT to the first query: "select DISTINCT id, age, count(*) over (partition by age) from students" - that should be comparable – quetzalcoatl Jan 23 '13 at 16:37
18

Here's another solution. this one uses very simple syntax. The first example of the accepted solution did not work on older versions of Microsoft SQL (i.e 2000)

SELECT age, count(*)
FROM Students 
GROUP by age
ORDER BY age
  • 1
    If you group by age though, you would only get one entry for age 25 with a count of 2 (when they actually want 2 entries with a count of 2 and separate id's for the example given) ? – Ian Mar 24 '17 at 13:15
  • 1
    Ian, thanks for the feedback. Did you execute your claim against a MS SQL 2000 DB? – Damian Apr 1 '17 at 15:47
7

I would do something like:

select
 A.id, A.age, B.count 
from 
 students A, 
 (select age, count(*) as count from students group by age) B
where A.age=B.age;
4
select s.id, s.age, c.count
from students s
inner join (
    select age, count(*) as count
    from students
    group by age
) c on s.age = c.age
order by id
1

and if data in "age" column has similar records (i.e. many people are 25 years old, many others are 32 and so on), it causes confusion in aligning right count to each student. in order to avoid it, I joined the tables on student ID as well.

SELECT S.id, S.age, C.cnt
FROM Students S 
INNER JOIN (SELECT id, age, count(age) as cnt  FROM Students GROUP BY student,age) 
C ON S.age = C.age *AND S.id = C.id*

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