12

I found that the best type to store lat and long in SQL Server is decimal (9,6) (ref. What datatype to use when storing latitude and longitude data in SQL databases?) and so I did

AddColumn("dbo.Table", "Latitude", c => c.Decimal(nullable: false, precision: 9, scale: 6));
AddColumn("dbo.Table", "Longitude", c => c.Decimal(nullable: false, precision: 9, scale: 6));

SQL seems ok, everything is working, BUT when I insert / update a value, i.e.

lat = 44.5912853

it is saved like this:

44.590000

I checked the flow, and just before the update, my entity contains the correct value, so I don't think is related to my code, but to some round that EF / SQL does. Do you have any idea to avoid this?

UPDATE

update [dbo].[Breweries]
set [RankId] = @0, 
[Name] = @1, 
[Foundation] = null, 
[DirectSale] = @2, 
[OnlineSale] = @3, 
[StreetAddress] = @4, 
[StreetAddress1] = null, 
[ZIP] = @5, 
[City] = @6, 
[Province] = @7, 
[CountryCode] = @8, 
[Latitude] = @9, 
[Longitude] = @10, 
[PIVA] = null, 
[CodFiscale] = null
where ([BreweryId] = @11)

enter image description here

POCO entity

[Table("Breweries")]
public class Brewery : ABrewery 
{
  ....
  public decimal Latitude { get; set; }
  public decimal Longitude { get; set; }
}

SQL Profiler

exec sp_executesql N'update [dbo].[Breweries]
set [RankId] = @0, [Name] = @1, [Foundation] = null, [DirectSale] = @2, [OnlineSale] = @3, [StreetAddress] = @4, [StreetAddress1] = null, [ZIP] = @5, [City] = @6, [Province] = @7, [CountryCode] = @8, [Latitude] = @9, [Longitude] = @10, [PIVA] = null, [CodFiscale] = null
where ([BreweryId] = @11)
',N'@0 int,@1 nvarchar(128),@2 bit,@3 bit,@4 nvarchar(256),@5 varchar(16),@6 nvarchar(64),@7 nvarchar(64),@8 nvarchar(128),@9 decimal(18,2),@10 decimal(18,2),@11 int',@0=2,@1=N'Davide',@2=0,@3=0,@4=N'Via Moscardini, 24',@5='zip',@6=N'city',@7=N'province',@8=N'ITA',

@9=44.59,@10=11.05,@11=2

Thanks

8

Apparently this guy had the exact same problem and solved it thus:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Activity>().Property(a => a.Latitude).HasPrecision(18, 9);
    modelBuilder.Entity<Activity>().Property(a => a.Longitude).HasPrecision(18, 9);
}

Although you may want to look at using the spatial data types (particularly geography) in SQL Server 2008 and later.

  • I saw "HasPrecision", but even if I add the namespace, I get an error when I try to use it (method not found) – Davide Feb 23 '13 at 11:41
  • Does it get to Property okay? – ta.speot.is Feb 23 '13 at 11:45
  • yes, neither the intellisense found it .. I thought that was an old version and I tried differently .. but I'll try again why I don't have this prop. – Davide Feb 23 '13 at 11:48
  • found it! and solve .. I don't know exactly why, I have a separeted project to collect all the EntityTypeConfiguration (that is probably useless but I feel more organize) .. in this project HasPrecision isn't found (I'll investigate and report here why) .. but if I set the property in the datacontext, I can do it .. and fix the problem – Davide Feb 23 '13 at 11:54
  • I was going to say you might have to cast it from Primitive... to Decimal... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – ta.speot.is Feb 23 '13 at 11:54
3

You can use DbGeography type for storing Latitude and Longitude.

using System.Data.Entity.Spatial;

public class Test
{
    public DbGeography Location { get; set; }
}
1

Two things:

  1. I just purchased a Zip code database and it stores all latitude and longitude values as decimal(12,6) data type. I don't think this is going to radically change your results though.

  2. I would check the exact SQL being sent to your SQL Server. You can then check to see where the rounding is occurring. You can check the SQL being sent by grabbing the output from EF or using SQL Profiler. My guess is that it's occuring in your C# code.

Also, it might be useful to see your table schema and your domain entity.

  • I posted the screenshot of the db table and what I see in Intellitrace (not very usefull I think, if you tell me how to better grab the output from EF, I'll post it) – Davide Feb 23 '13 at 11:29
  • What about your C# entity? – Randy Minder Feb 23 '13 at 11:34
  • simply property, decimal type (updated the post) – Davide Feb 23 '13 at 11:39
  • I was able to profile, as you can see, the values are already rounded before the update – Davide Feb 23 '13 at 11:49
  • Fix using the HasPrecision method in the modelbuilder config. but anyway thank you :) – Davide Feb 23 '13 at 11:54
0

Use the data type of these fields as Float:

 Latitude float,
 Longitude float

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