4

I trying to make replacement for timeout using perl (need in centos5)

here the script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
my $pid=$$;
my $timeout=shift;
my @args=@ARGV;
eval {
        local $SIG{ALRM} = sub {
          print "Timed OUT!\n";
          exit 142;
          kill 9,$pid;
        };
        alarm($timeout);
        system(@args);
};
exit $?;

while testing it I found:

Here all fine

time /tmp/timeout 3 sleep 6
Timed OUT!

real    0m3.007s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.004s

but here all bad

time echo `/tmp/timeout 3 sleep 6`
Timed OUT!

real    0m6.009s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.004s

on my debian system I tested with /usr/bin/timeout:

time echo `/usr/bin/timeout 3 sleep 6`


real    0m3.004s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s

So the questions

  • why the perl script work so strange ?
  • is there any real working way to have timeout writen on perl which will work the same as binary timeout ?

please note, that I know about /usr/share/doc/bash-3.2/scripts/timeout and I also found that it acts the same as my perl approach

also please note that I can't install modules from CPAN on the server targeted for this script

i tried with exec() but in that case it does not handle signal in sub.

UPD

with the script from @rhj (had to fix a little)

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $PID=$$;
my $timeout=shift;
my @args=@ARGV;

my $pid = fork();
defined $pid or die "fork: $!";
$pid == 0 && exec(@args);

my $timed_out = 0;
$SIG{ALRM} = sub { $timed_out = 1; die; };
alarm $timeout;
eval { waitpid $pid, 0 };
alarm 0;
if ($timed_out) {
    print "Timed out!\n";
    kill 9, $pid;
    kill 9, $PID;
}
elsif ($@) {
    warn "error: $@\n";
}

it pass above test but fail in the case of calling external script:

run_script

#!/bin/sh
sleep 6

test.sh

#!/bin/sh
a=`./timeout.pl 2 ./run_script.sh`

output

$ time ./test.sh 

real    0m6.020s
user    0m0.004s
sys     0m0.008s
1

This version should always work:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $pid=$$;
my $timeout=shift;
my @args=@ARGV;

my $pid = fork();
defined $pid or die "fork: $!";
$pid == 0 && exec(@args);

my $timed_out = 0;
$SIG{ALRM} = sub { $timed_out = 1; die; };
alarm $timeout;
eval { waitpid $pid, 0 };
alarm 0;
if ($timed_out) {
    print "Timed out!\n";
    kill 9, $pid;
}
elsif ($@) {
    warn "error: $@\n";
}

It does not handle an error in the exec() call, though.

  • and your sample wihout fix: "my" variable $pid masks earlier declaration in same scope at /tmp/timeout line 8. – zb' Feb 24 '13 at 0:01
  • there is the test case when it still not works: gist.github.com/zba/5021950 – zb' Feb 24 '13 at 0:15
0

Had to make it with IPC::Cmd;

#!/usr/bin/perl -w 
use strict;
use IPC::Cmd qw(run_forked);
my $timeout=shift;
my $stdout;
my $hashref = run_forked(@ARGV, { timeout => $timeout});
print $hashref->{'stdout'};
print STDERR $hashref->{'stderr'}; 
if ($hashref->{'timeout'}) {            
        print STDERR "Timed out!\n";
        exit 142;
}
exit $hashref->{'exit_code'};

the bad thing that I had to install IPC::Cmd using rpmforge.

  • I thought you could't install modules from CPAN on the server targeted for this script. IPC::Cmd is on CPAN. – Brad Gilbert Feb 25 '13 at 0:36

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