42

I have a program that shows you whether two words are anagrams of one another. There are a few examples that will not work properly and I would appreciate any help, although if it were not advanced that would be great, as I am a 1st year programmer. "schoolmaster" and "theclassroom" are anagrams of one another, however when I change "theclassroom" to "theclafsroom" it still says they are anagrams, what am I doing wrong?

import java.util.ArrayList;
public class AnagramCheck
{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
      String phrase1 = "tbeclassroom";
      phrase1 = (phrase1.toLowerCase()).trim();
      char[] phrase1Arr = phrase1.toCharArray();

      String phrase2 = "schoolmaster";
      phrase2 = (phrase2.toLowerCase()).trim();
      ArrayList<Character> phrase2ArrList = convertStringToArraylist(phrase2);

      if (phrase1.length() != phrase2.length()) 
      {
          System.out.print("There is no anagram present.");
      } 
      else 
      {
          boolean isFound = true;
          for (int i=0; i<phrase1Arr.length; i++)
          {  
              for(int j = 0; j < phrase2ArrList.size(); j++) 
              {
                  if(phrase1Arr[i] == phrase2ArrList.get(j))
                  {
                      System.out.print("There is a common element.\n");
                      isFound = ;
                      phrase2ArrList.remove(j);
                  }
              }
              if(isFound == false)
              {
                  System.out.print("There are no anagrams present.");
                  return;
              } 
          }
          System.out.printf("%s is an anagram of %s", phrase1, phrase2);
      }
  }

  public static ArrayList<Character> convertStringToArraylist(String str) {
      ArrayList<Character> charList = new ArrayList<Character>(); 
      for(int i = 0; i<str.length();i++){
          charList.add(str.charAt(i));
      }
      return charList;
  }
}
  • Hint for mathematicians: the relation "are anagrams" between strings is an equivalence relation, so partitions the set of all strings into equivalence classes. Write down a rule to choose a representative from each class. Then you compare classes by comparing representatives. – Colonel Panic Jul 29 '15 at 16:13
  • 3
    Folks - if you are going to answer this, please please, please 1) check that your Answer isn't just another duplicate of the 37 previous answers, and 2) don't just post code. Post an explanation of your code, and say why it is different to (and hopeful better than) the other answers. – Stephen C Jan 18 '16 at 4:26
  • 2
    Possible duplicate of finding if two words are anagrams of each other – vitaut Mar 24 '16 at 14:09
  • The question is , why the code is not working properly. All these posts that provide an code/algorithm to solfe the problem are unnecessary . The accepted answer does not find the problem in the code, too, and makes a wrong claim (that it did not support by a reference or proof) but gets a lot of upvotes . this is infuriating. – miracle173 Jun 16 '17 at 14:38

32 Answers 32

90

Fastest algorithm would be to map each of the 26 English characters to a unique prime number. Then calculate the product of the string. By the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, 2 strings are anagrams if and only if their products are the same.

  • 5
    Fast probably but fastest probably not. In that case why not simply use two char[26]? And it has the obvious caveat that it only works for English. – assylias Jun 9 '13 at 8:42
  • 1
    should work for all characters. Also it's O(n), which is faster than sorting. – SeriousBusiness Jun 9 '13 at 16:11
  • 8
    For a long phrase you would quickly overflow 64 bits, and BigDecimals are /slow/; an int[26] is a much safer (and faster) bet. – tucuxi Nov 21 '13 at 16:27
  • 1
    Can't we just use the character values instead of prime numbers, I think it will also work, isnt it? – seriously divergent May 22 '15 at 1:55
  • 4
    @user2900314 Key observation is that it must work for prime numbers. Anagrams will have the same "prime factorization". – Giles Oct 29 '15 at 22:25
99

Two words are anagrams of each other if they contain the same number of characters and the same characters. You should only need to sort the characters in lexicographic order, and determine if all the characters in one string are equal to and in the same order as all of the characters in the other string.

Here's a code example. Look into Arrays in the API to understand what's going on here.

public boolean isAnagram(String firstWord, String secondWord) {
     char[] word1 = firstWord.replaceAll("[\\s]", "").toCharArray();
     char[] word2 = secondWord.replaceAll("[\\s]", "").toCharArray();
     Arrays.sort(word1);
     Arrays.sort(word2);
     return Arrays.equals(word1, word2);
}
  • That worked perfectly! Thanks so much! – Chilli Feb 24 '13 at 16:58
  • 4
    Your algorithm runs in O(NlogN) (N is the lenght of both the strings together) there is a O(N) algorithm using O(N/2)~O(N) memory. See my answer – ɭɘ ɖɵʊɒɼɖ 江戸 Aug 7 '13 at 9:53
  • 11
    I think you should make all the characters to lowercase as well. – Koray Tugay Sep 28 '13 at 21:52
  • Two phrases are anagrams if they are permutations of each other, ignoring spaces and capitalization. cs.duke.edu/csed/algoprobs/anagram.html – Koray Tugay Sep 28 '13 at 21:53
  • 2
    @EricWoodruff: This probably wasn't intended as a 100% complete example; there are obvious optimizations in comparing lengths to begin with as well as forcing everything to be the same case. This was meant to be illustrative as opposed to cut-and-paste valid code. – Makoto Jan 30 '14 at 21:37
48

If you sort either array, the solution becomes O(n log n). but if you use a hashmap, it's O(n). tested and working.

char[] word1 = "test".toCharArray();
char[] word2 = "tes".toCharArray();

Map<Character, Integer> lettersInWord1 = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();

for (char c : word1) {
    int count = 1;
    if (lettersInWord1.containsKey(c)) {
        count = lettersInWord1.get(c) + 1;
    }
    lettersInWord1.put(c, count);
}

for (char c : word2) {
    int count = -1;
    if (lettersInWord1.containsKey(c)) {
        count = lettersInWord1.get(c) - 1;
    }
    lettersInWord1.put(c, count);
}

for (char c : lettersInWord1.keySet()) {
    if (lettersInWord1.get(c) != 0) {
        return false;
    }
}

return true;
  • Thanks so much for that! Solved all my problems straight away! :D – Chilli Feb 24 '13 at 16:57
  • 2
    You need to specify <Character, Integer> or it will not compile. Autoboxing can take care of the rest – tucuxi Nov 21 '13 at 16:29
  • @tucuxi good catch, fixed. – jb. Nov 21 '13 at 19:07
  • 1
    but the map is empty , you have not put the characters in – anshulkatta Jun 29 '14 at 10:14
  • 1
    I am getting Invalid argument to operation ++/-- for the line lettersInWord1.get(c)++; lettersInWord1.get(c)--; – SuRa Feb 4 '15 at 7:08
25

Here's a simple fast O(n) solution without using sorting or multiple loops or hash maps. We increment the count of each character in the first array and decrement the count of each character in the second array. If the resulting counts array is full of zeros, the strings are anagrams. Can be expanded to include other characters by increasing the size of the counts array.

class AnagramsFaster{

    private static boolean compare(String a, String b){
        char[] aArr = a.toLowerCase().toCharArray(), bArr = b.toLowerCase().toCharArray();
        if (aArr.length != bArr.length)
            return false;
        int[] counts = new int[26]; // An array to hold the number of occurrences of each character
        for (int i = 0; i < aArr.length; i++){
            counts[aArr[i]-97]++;  // Increment the count of the character at i
            counts[bArr[i]-97]--;  // Decrement the count of the character at i
        }
        // If the strings are anagrams, the counts array will be full of zeros
        for (int i = 0; i<26; i++)
            if (counts[i] != 0)
                return false;
        return true;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        System.out.println(compare(args[0], args[1]));
    }
}
  • just a quick little improvement, I'd add the following test, that checks if the two strings are equal (ignoring case), as that would make them, naturally, anagrams: if (a.equalsIgnoreCase(b)) return true. – Tarek Feb 6 '18 at 18:32
  • Perfect O(n) and O(1) solution. – Shanu Gupta May 15 '18 at 2:45
22

Lots of people have presented solutions, but I just want to talk about the algorithmic complexity of some of the common approaches:

  • The simple "sort the characters using Arrays.sort()" approach is going to be O(N log N).

  • If you use radix sorting, that reduces to O(N) with O(M) space, where M is the number of distinct characters in the alphabet. (That is 26 in English ... but in theory we ought to consider multi-lingual anagrams.)

  • The "count the characters" using an array of counts is also O(N) ... and faster than radix sort because you don't need to reconstruct the sorted string. Space usage will be O(M).

  • A "count the characters" using a dictionary, hashmap, treemap, or equivalent will be slower that the array approach, unless the alphabet is huge.

  • The elegant "product-of-primes" approach is unfortunately O(N^2) in the worst case This is because for long-enough words or phrases, the product of the primes won't fit into a long. That means that you'd need to use BigInteger, and N times multiplying a BigInteger by a small constant is O(N^2).

    For a hypothetical large alphabet, the scaling factor is going to be large. The worst-case space usage to hold the product of the primes as a BigInteger is (I think) O(N*logM).

  • A hashcode based approach is usually O(N) if the words are not anagrams. If the hashcodes are equal, then you still need to do a proper anagram test. So this is not a complete solution.

6

O(n) solution without any kind of sorting and using only one map.

public boolean isAnagram(String leftString, String rightString) {
  if (leftString == null || rightString == null) {
    return false;
  } else if (leftString.length() != rightString.length()) {
    return false;
  }

  Map<Character, Integer> occurrencesMap = new HashMap<>();

  for(int i = 0; i < leftString.length(); i++){
    char charFromLeft = leftString.charAt(i);
    int nrOfCharsInLeft = occurrencesMap.containsKey(charFromLeft) ? occurrencesMap.get(charFromLeft) : 0;
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromLeft, ++nrOfCharsInLeft);
    char charFromRight = rightString.charAt(i);
    int nrOfCharsInRight = occurrencesMap.containsKey(charFromRight) ? occurrencesMap.get(charFromRight) : 0;
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromRight, --nrOfCharsInRight);
  }

  for(int occurrencesNr : occurrencesMap.values()){
    if(occurrencesNr != 0){
      return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}

and less generic solution but a little bit faster one. You have to place your alphabet here:

public boolean isAnagram(String leftString, String rightString) {
  if (leftString == null || rightString == null) {
    return false;
  } else if (leftString.length() != rightString.length()) {
    return false;
  }

  char letters[] = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z'};
  Map<Character, Integer> occurrencesMap = new HashMap<>();
  for (char l : letters) {
    occurrencesMap.put(l, 0);
  }

  for(int i = 0; i < leftString.length(); i++){
    char charFromLeft = leftString.charAt(i);
    Integer nrOfCharsInLeft = occurrencesMap.get(charFromLeft);
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromLeft, ++nrOfCharsInLeft);
    char charFromRight = rightString.charAt(i);
    Integer nrOfCharsInRight = occurrencesMap.get(charFromRight);
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromRight, --nrOfCharsInRight);
  }

  for(Integer occurrencesNr : occurrencesMap.values()){
    if(occurrencesNr != 0){
      return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}
4

We're walking two equal length strings and tracking the differences between them. We don't care what the differences are, we just want to know if they have the same characters or not. We can do this in O(n/2) without any post processing (or a lot of primes).

public class TestAnagram {
  public static boolean isAnagram(String first, String second) {
    String positive = first.toLowerCase();
    String negative = second.toLowerCase();

    if (positive.length() != negative.length()) {
      return false;
    }

    int[] counts = new int[26];

    int diff = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < positive.length(); i++) {
      int pos = (int) positive.charAt(i) - 97; // convert the char into an array index
      if (counts[pos] >= 0) { // the other string doesn't have this
        diff++; // an increase in differences
      } else { // it does have it
        diff--; // a decrease in differences
      }
      counts[pos]++; // track it

      int neg = (int) negative.charAt(i) - 97;
      if (counts[neg] <= 0) { // the other string doesn't have this
        diff++; // an increase in differences
      } else { // it does have it
        diff--; // a decrease in differences
      }
      counts[neg]--; // track it
    }

    return diff == 0;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(isAnagram("zMarry", "zArmry")); // true
    System.out.println(isAnagram("basiparachromatin", "marsipobranchiata")); // true
    System.out.println(isAnagram("hydroxydeoxycorticosterones", "hydroxydesoxycorticosterone")); // true
    System.out.println(isAnagram("hydroxydeoxycorticosterones", "hydroxydesoxycorticosterons")); // false
    System.out.println(isAnagram("zArmcy", "zArmry")); // false
  }
}

Yes this code is dependent on the ASCII English character set of lowercase characters but it shouldn't be hard to modify to other languages. You can always use a Map[Character, Int] to track the same information, it'll just be slower.

3

By using more memory (an HashMap of at most N/2 elements)we do not need to sort the strings.

public static boolean areAnagrams(String one, String two) {
    if (one.length() == two.length()) {
        String s0 = one.toLowerCase();
        String s1 = two.toLowerCase();
        HashMap<Character, Integer> chars = new HashMap<Character, Integer>(one.length());
        Integer count;
        for (char c : s0.toCharArray()) {
            count = chars.get(c);
            count = Integer.valueOf(count != null ? count + 1 : 1);
            chars.put(c, count);
        }
        for (char c : s1.toCharArray()) {
            count = chars.get(c);
            if (count == null) {
                return false;
            } else {
                count--;
                chars.put(c, count);
            }
        }
        for (Integer i : chars.values()) {
            if (i != 0) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

This function is actually running in O(N) ... instead of O(NlogN) for the solution that sorts the strings. If I were to assume that you are going to use only alphabetic characters I could only use an array of 26 ints (from a to z without accents or decorations) instead of the hashmap.

If we define that : N = |one| + |two| we do one iteration over N (once over one to increment the counters, and once to decrement them over two). Then to check the totals we iterate over at mose N/2.

The other algorithms described have one advantage: they do not use extra memory assuming that Arrays.sort uses inplace versions of QuickSort or merge sort. But since we are talking about anagrams I will assume that we are talking about human languages, thus words should not be long enough to give memory issues.

  • what about ' ' (space char)??? – Javier Jan 18 '17 at 6:00
3
    /*
 * To change this template, choose Tools | Templates
 * and open the template in the editor.
 */

package Algorithms;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.HashMap;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

/**
 *
 * @author Mokhtar
 */
public class Anagrams {

    //Write aprogram to check if two words are anagrams
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Anagrams an=new Anagrams();
        ArrayList<String> l=new ArrayList<String>();
        String result=JOptionPane.showInputDialog("How many words to test anagrams");
        if(Integer.parseInt(result) >1)
        {    
            for(int i=0;i<Integer.parseInt(result);i++)
            {

                String word=JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Enter word #"+i);
                l.add(word);   
            }
            System.out.println(an.isanagrams(l));
        }
        else
        {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Can not be tested, \nYou can test two words or more");
        }

    }

    private static String sortString( String w )
    {
        char[] ch = w.toCharArray();
        Arrays.sort(ch);
        return new String(ch);
    }

    public boolean isanagrams(ArrayList<String> l)
    {
        boolean isanagrams=true; 
        ArrayList<String> anagrams = null;
        HashMap<String, ArrayList<String>> map =  new HashMap<String, ArrayList<String>>();
        for(int i=0;i<l.size();i++)
            {
        String word = l.get(i);
        String sortedWord = sortString(word);
            anagrams = map.get( sortedWord );
        if( anagrams == null ) anagrams = new ArrayList<String>();
        anagrams.add(word);
        map.put(sortedWord, anagrams);
            }

            for(int h=0;h<l.size();h++)
            {
                if(!anagrams.contains(l.get(h)))
                {
                    isanagrams=false;
                    break;
                }
            }

            return isanagrams;
        //}
        }

}
3

I am a C++ developer and the code below is in C++. I believe the fastest and easiest way to go about it would be the following:

Create a vector of ints of size 26, with all slots initialized to 0, and place each character of the string into the appropriate position in the vector. Remember, the vector is in alphabetical order and so if the first letter in the string is z, it would go in myvector[26]. Note: This can be done using ASCII characters so essentially your code will look something like this:

string s = zadg;
for(int i =0; i < s.size(); ++i){
    myvector[s[i] - 'a'] = myvector['s[i] - 'a'] + 1;
} 

So inserting all the elements would take O(n) time as you would only traverse the list once. You can now do the exact same thing for the second string and that too would take O(n) time. You can then compare the two vectors by checking to see if the counters in each slot are the same. If they are, that means you had the same number of EACH character in both the strings and thus they are anagrams. The comparing of the two vectors should also take O(n) time as you are only traversing through it once.

Note: The code only works for a single word of characters. If you have spaces, and numbers and symbols, you can just create a vector of size 96 (ASCII characters 32-127) and instead of saying - 'a' you would say - ' ' as the space character is the first one in the ASCII list of characters.

I hope that helps. If i have made a mistake somewhere, please leave a comment.

3

Many complicated answers here. Base on the accepted answer and the comment mentioning the 'ac'-'bb' issue assuming A=1 B=2 C=3, we could simply use the square of each integer that represent a char and solve the problem:

public boolean anagram(String s, String t) {
    if(s.length() != t.length())
        return false;

    int value = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++){
        value += ((int)s.charAt(i))^2;
        value -= ((int)t.charAt(i))^2;
    }
    return value == 0;
}
  • 2
    This wont work for strings "E" = 5 and "CD" = 3,4. Or for that matter any Pythagorean triplet. – Codebender Aug 5 '15 at 3:06
  • @Codebender Length is checked before comparison – chakming Aug 5 '15 at 3:10
  • plus, int value of alphabetical char is hard to cause such possible cases – chakming Nov 4 '15 at 3:31
2

Thanks for pointing out to make comment, while making comment I found that there was incorrect logic. I corrected the logic and added comment for each piece of code.

// Time complexity: O(N) where N is number of character in String
// Required space :constant space.
// will work for string that contains ASCII chars

private static boolean isAnagram(String s1, String s2) {

    // if length of both string's are not equal then they are not anagram of each other 
    if(s1.length() != s2.length())return false;

    // array to store the presence of a character with number of occurrences.   
    int []seen = new int[256];

    // initialize the array with zero. Do not need to initialize specifically  since by default element will initialized by 0.
    // Added this is just increase the readability of the code. 
    Arrays.fill(seen, 0);

    // convert each string to lower case if you want to make ABC and aBC as anagram, other wise no need to change the case.  
    s1 = s1.toLowerCase();
    s2 = s2.toLowerCase();

    //  iterate through the first string and count the occurrences of each character
    for(int i =0; i < s1.length(); i++){
        seen[s1.charAt(i)] = seen[s1.charAt(i)] +1;
    }

    // iterate through second string and if any char has 0 occurrence then return false, it mean some char in s2 is there that is not present in s1.
    // other wise reduce the occurrences by one every time .
    for(int i =0; i < s2.length(); i++){
        if(seen[s2.charAt(i)] ==0)return false;
        seen[s2.charAt(i)] = seen[s2.charAt(i)]-1;
    }

    // now if both string have same occurrence of each character then the seen array must contains all element as zero. if any one has non zero element return false mean there are 
    // some character that either does not appear in one of the string or/and mismatch in occurrences 
    for(int i = 0; i < 256; i++){
        if(seen[i] != 0)return false;
    }
    return true;
}
1

A similar answer may have been posted in C++, here it is again in Java. Note that the most elegant way would be to use a Trie to store the characters in sorted order, however, that's a more complex solution. One way is to use a hashset to store all the words we are comparing and then compare them one by one. To compare them, make an array of characters with the index representing the ANCII value of the characters (using a normalizer since ie. ANCII value of 'a' is 97) and the value representing the occurrence count of that character. This will run in O(n) time and use O(m*z) space where m is the size of the currentWord and z the size for the storedWord, both for which we create a Char[].

public static boolean makeAnagram(String currentWord, String storedWord){
    if(currentWord.length() != storedWord.length()) return false;//words must be same length
    Integer[] currentWordChars = new Integer[totalAlphabets];
    Integer[] storedWordChars = new Integer[totalAlphabets];
    //create a temp Arrays to compare the words
    storeWordCharacterInArray(currentWordChars, currentWord);
    storeWordCharacterInArray(storedWordChars, storedWord);
    for(int i = 0; i < totalAlphabets; i++){
        //compare the new word to the current charList to see if anagram is possible
        if(currentWordChars[i] != storedWordChars[i]) return false;
    }
    return true;//and store this word in the HashSet of word in the Heap
}
//for each word store its characters
public static void storeWordCharacterInArray(Integer[] characterList, String word){
    char[] charCheck = word.toCharArray();
    for(char c: charCheck){
        Character cc = c;
        int index = cc.charValue()-indexNormalizer;
        characterList[index] += 1;
    }
}
1

So far all proposed solutions work with separate char items, not code points. I'd like to propose two solutions to properly handle surrogate pairs as well (those are characters from U+10000 to U+10FFFF, composed of two char items).

1) One-line O(n logn) solution which utilizes Java 8 CharSequence.codePoints() stream:

static boolean areAnagrams(CharSequence a, CharSequence b) {
    return Arrays.equals(a.codePoints().sorted().toArray(),
                         b.codePoints().sorted().toArray());
}

2) Less elegant O(n) solution (in fact, it will be faster only for long strings with low chances to be anagrams):

static boolean areAnagrams(CharSequence a, CharSequence b) {
    int len = a.length();
    if (len != b.length())
        return false;

    // collect codepoint occurrences in "a"
    Map<Integer, Integer> ocr = new HashMap<>(64);
    a.codePoints().forEach(c -> ocr.merge(c, 1, Integer::sum));

    // for each codepoint in "b", look for matching occurrence
    for (int i = 0, c = 0; i < len; i += Character.charCount(c)) {
        int cc = ocr.getOrDefault((c = Character.codePointAt(b, i)), 0);
        if (cc == 0)                        
            return false;            
        ocr.put(c, cc - 1);
    }
    return true;
}
1

How a mathematician might think about the problem before writing any code:

  1. The relation "are anagrams" between strings is an equivalence relation, so partitions the set of all strings into equivalence classes.
  2. Suppose we had a rule to choose a representative (crib) from each class, then it's easy to test whether two classes are the same by comparing their representatives.
  3. An obvious representative for a set of strings is "the smallest element by lexicographic order", which is easy to compute from any element by sorting. For example, the representative of the anagram class containing 'hat' is 'aht'.

In your example "schoolmaster" and "theclassroom" are anagrams because they are both in the anagram class with crib "acehlmoorsst".

In pseudocode:

>>> def crib(word):
...     return sorted(word)
...
>>> crib("schoolmaster") == crib("theclassroom")
True
1
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.TreeMap;
/**
 * Check if Anagram by Prime Number Logic
 * @author Pallav
 *
 */
public class Anagram {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        System.out.println(isAnagram(args[0].toUpperCase(),
                args[1].toUpperCase()));
    }
/**
 * 
 * @param word : The String 1
 * @param anagram_word : The String 2 with which Anagram to be verified
 * @return true or false based on Anagram
 */
    public static Boolean isAnagram(String word, String anagram_word) {
        //If length is different return false
        if (word.length() != anagram_word.length()) {
            return false;
        }
        char[] words_char = word.toCharArray();//Get the Char Array of First String
        char[] anagram_word_char = anagram_word.toCharArray();//Get the Char Array of Second String
        int words_char_num = 1;//Initialize Multiplication Factor to 1
        int anagram_word_num = 1;//Initialize Multiplication Factor to 1 for String 2
        Map<Character, Integer> wordPrimeMap = wordPrimeMap();//Get the Prime numbers Mapped to each alphabets in English
        for (int i = 0; i < words_char.length; i++) {
            words_char_num *= wordPrimeMap.get(words_char[i]);//get Multiplication value for String 1
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < anagram_word_char.length; i++) {
            anagram_word_num *= wordPrimeMap.get(anagram_word_char[i]);//get Multiplication value for String 2
        }

        return anagram_word_num == words_char_num;
    }
/**
 * Get the Prime numbers Mapped to each alphabets in English
 * @return
 */
    public static Map<Character, Integer> wordPrimeMap() {
        List<Integer> primes = primes(26);
        int k = 65;
        Map<Character, Integer> map = new TreeMap<Character, Integer>();
        for (int i = 0; i < primes.size(); i++) {
            Character character = (char) k;
            map.put(character, primes.get(i));
            k++;
        }
        // System.out.println(map);
        return map;
    }
/**
 * get first N prime Numbers where Number is greater than 2
 * @param N : Number of Prime Numbers
 * @return
 */
    public static List<Integer> primes(Integer N) {
        List<Integer> primes = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        primes.add(2);
        primes.add(3);

        int n = 5;
        int k = 0;
        do {
            boolean is_prime = true;
            for (int i = 2; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i++) {
                if (n % i == 0) {
                    is_prime = false;
                    break;
                }
            }

            if (is_prime == true) {
                primes.add(n);

            }
            n++;
            // System.out.println(k);
        } while (primes.size() < N);

        // }

        return primes;
    }

}
1

IMHO, the most efficient solution was provided by @Siguza, I have extended it to cover strings with space e.g: "William Shakespeare", "I am a weakish speller", "School master", "The classroom"

public int getAnagramScore(String word, String anagram) {

        if (word == null || anagram == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("Both, word and anagram, must be non-null");
        }

        char[] wordArray = word.trim().toLowerCase().toCharArray();
        char[] anagramArray = anagram.trim().toLowerCase().toCharArray();

        int[] alphabetCountArray = new int[26];

        int reference = 'a';

        for (int i = 0; i < wordArray.length; i++) {
            if (!Character.isWhitespace(wordArray[i])) {
                alphabetCountArray[wordArray[i] - reference]++;
            }
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < anagramArray.length; i++) {
            if (!Character.isWhitespace(anagramArray[i])) {
                alphabetCountArray[anagramArray[i] - reference]--;
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < 26; i++)
            if (alphabetCountArray[i] != 0)
                return 0;

        return word.length();

    }
1

Here is my solution.First explode the strings into char arrays then sort them and then comparing if they are equal or not. I guess time complexity of this code is O(a+b).if a=b we can say O(2A)

public boolean isAnagram(String s1, String s2) {

        StringBuilder sb1 = new StringBuilder();
        StringBuilder sb2 = new StringBuilder();
        if (s1.length() != s2.length())
            return false;

        char arr1[] = s1.toCharArray();
        char arr2[] = s2.toCharArray();
        Arrays.sort(arr1);
        Arrays.sort(arr2);



        for (char c : arr1) {
            sb1.append(c);
        }

        for (char c : arr2) {
            sb2.append(c);
        }

        System.out.println(sb1.toString());
        System.out.println(sb2.toString());

        if (sb1.toString().equals(sb2.toString()))
            return true;
        else
            return false;

    }
  • O(a+b) when you are sorting twice... – ByeBye Mar 7 '18 at 13:20
  • The cost of Arrays.sort is O(nlogn) > O(n) – jkonst Dec 12 '18 at 19:47
0

Some other solution without sorting.

public static boolean isAnagram(String s1, String s2){
    //case insensitive anagram

    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(s2.toLowerCase());
    for (char c: s1.toLowerCase().toCharArray()){
        if (Character.isLetter(c)){

            int index = sb.indexOf(String.valueOf(c));
            if (index == -1){
                //char does not exist in other s2
                return false;
            }
            sb.deleteCharAt(index);
        }
    }
    for (char c: sb.toString().toCharArray()){
        //only allow whitespace as left overs
        if (!Character.isWhitespace(c)){
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
  • Sorting is more efficient... – vonbrand Apr 20 '13 at 23:24
  • AFAIK sorting twice is N(Log N)*N(Log N). This algorithm requires NN. Also, the second loop is not always executed which brings it average between N and NN. I did some rough testing with System.nanoTime() time diff, which shows that sorting is slower. Maybe I am overlooking something.... – jmh Apr 21 '13 at 13:51
  • correction: O(N LogN) + O(N Log N) vs O(N) < performance < O(N+N) – jmh Apr 21 '13 at 14:00
  • 1
    It is $O(N \log N)$ versus $O(N^2)$, actually. – vonbrand Apr 22 '13 at 1:18
  • Maybe you can help me out why this is the case and why performance is slower for sort. I looked at Skiena's algorithm design manual, and agree with NlogN. The manual states that O(f(n)) +O(g(n)) = O(max(f(n),g(n))). Hence, the result becomes O(NlogN) vs N? Maybe it is me, but I do not see why this algorithm is N^2 as I do not see any nested loops unless they are hidden somewhere in JAVA? Also, why does it have lower CPU time? – jmh Apr 22 '13 at 9:35
0

Sorting approach is not the best one. It takes O(n) space and O(nlogn) time. Instead, make a hash map of characters and count them (increment characters that appear in the first string and decrement characters that appear in the second string). When some count reaches zero, remove it from hash. Finally, if two strings are anagrams, then the hash table will be empty in the end - otherwise it will not be empty.

Couple of important notes: (1) Ignore letter case and (2) Ignore white space.

Here is the detailed analysis and implementation in C#: Testing If Two Strings are Anagrams

  • for every put in the hashmap , hashcode and equals are called...is this really good for big strings...i think sort will be much faster than this in that case – anshulkatta Jun 29 '14 at 9:53
  • Solution with hash set takes O(n) time and O(m) additional space, where m is total number of distinct characters in two strings. Basically, m should not exceed 100 or so if strings are plain text. This means that hash set solution reduces asymptotic execution time from O(nlogn) to O(n) and reduces added space from O(n) to practically O(1). This should have significant impact in large strings. – Zoran Horvat Jul 10 '14 at 9:20
0

A simple method to figure out whether the testString is an anagram of the baseString.

private static boolean isAnagram(String baseString, String testString){
    //Assume that there are no empty spaces in either string.

    if(baseString.length() != testString.length()){
        System.out.println("The 2 given words cannot be anagram since their lengths are different");
        return false;
    }
    else{
        if(baseString.length() == testString.length()){
            if(baseString.equalsIgnoreCase(testString)){
                System.out.println("The 2 given words are anagram since they are identical.");
                return true;
            }
            else{
                List<Character> list = new ArrayList<>();

                for(Character ch : baseString.toLowerCase().toCharArray()){
                    list.add(ch);
                }
                System.out.println("List is : "+ list);

                for(Character ch : testString.toLowerCase().toCharArray()){
                    if(list.contains(ch)){
                        list.remove(ch);
                    }
                }

                if(list.isEmpty()){
                    System.out.println("The 2 words are anagrams");
                    return true;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}
0

Sorry, the solution is in C#, but I think the different elements used to arrive at the solution is quite intuitive. Slight tweak required for hyphenated words but for normal words it should work fine.

    internal bool isAnagram(string input1,string input2)
    {
        Dictionary<char, int> outChars = AddToDict(input2.ToLower().Replace(" ", ""));
        input1 = input1.ToLower().Replace(" ","");
        foreach(char c in input1)
        {
            if (outChars.ContainsKey(c))
            {
                if (outChars[c] > 1)
                    outChars[c] -= 1;
                else
                    outChars.Remove(c);
            }
        }
        return outChars.Count == 0;
    }

    private Dictionary<char, int> AddToDict(string input)
    {
        Dictionary<char, int> inputChars = new Dictionary<char, int>();
        foreach(char c in input)
        {
            if(inputChars.ContainsKey(c))
            {
                inputChars[c] += 1;
            }
            else
            {
                inputChars.Add(c, 1);
            }     
        }
        return inputChars;
    }
0

I saw that no one has used the "hashcode" approach to find out the anagrams. I found my approach little different than the approaches discussed above hence thought of sharing it. I wrote the below code to find the anagrams which works in O(n).

/**
 * This class performs the logic of finding anagrams
 * @author ripudam
 *
 */
public class AnagramTest {

    public static boolean isAnagram(final String word1, final String word2) {

            if (word1 == null || word2 == null || word1.length() != word2.length()) {
                 return false;
            }

            if (word1.equals(word2)) {
                return true;
            }

            final AnagramWrapper word1Obj = new AnagramWrapper(word1);
            final AnagramWrapper word2Obj = new AnagramWrapper(word2);

            if (word1Obj.equals(word2Obj)) {
                return true;
            }

            return false;
        }

        /*
         * Inner class to wrap the string received for anagram check to find the
         * hash
         */
        static class AnagramWrapper {
            String word;

            public AnagramWrapper(final String word) {
                this.word = word;
            }

            @Override
            public boolean equals(final Object obj) {

                return hashCode() == obj.hashCode();
            }

            @Override
            public int hashCode() {
                final char[] array = word.toCharArray();
                int hashcode = 0;
                for (final char c : array) {
                    hashcode = hashcode + (c * c);
                }
                return hashcode;
            }
         }
    }
  • Is "ac" an anagram of "bb"? Also, how many hash codes are there, and how many combinations of characters? – greybeard Sep 25 '14 at 22:00
  • I got your point. I did the little modification. It is generating the hash codes at runtime for any combination of string of unicode characters. – Ripu Daman Sep 25 '14 at 22:28
  • While your overload of equals does implement an equivalence relation, it throws on null == obj instead of returning false. Worse, it does not implement equality wrt anagrams. Take strings over an alphabet with just 10 characters of numerical value 1 to 10 (to facilitate "multiplicative hashing"). Let your hashcode be one decimal digit, and consider strings of two characters, only: how many equivalence classes are there? Once you have more classes than codes, no amount of cleverness in encoding will save your day. – greybeard Sep 26 '14 at 6:59
  • This approach can only do the "not an anagram" test fast. If two words / phrases have the same hashcode, you still have to do a longer test to see if they are algorithms. – Stephen C Sep 27 '14 at 3:02
  • @greybeard I didn't implement checks for null here because that wasn't the intent here. I was mainly focusing on finding the anagram easily. However I didn't understand your other comment. – Ripu Daman Sep 27 '14 at 10:22
0

Here is another approach using HashMap in Java

public static boolean isAnagram(String first, String second) {
    if (first == null || second == null) {
        return false;
    }
    if (first.length() != second.length()) {
        return false;
    }
    return doCheckAnagramUsingHashMap(first.toLowerCase(), second.toLowerCase());
}

private static boolean doCheckAnagramUsingHashMap(final String first, final String second) {
    Map<Character, Integer> counter = populateMap(first, second);
    return validateMap(counter);
}

private static boolean validateMap(Map<Character, Integer> counter) {
    for (int val : counter.values()) {
        if (val != 0) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Here is the test case

@Test
public void anagramTest() {
    assertTrue(StringUtil.isAnagram("keep" , "PeeK"));
    assertFalse(StringUtil.isAnagram("Hello", "hell"));
    assertTrue(StringUtil.isAnagram("SiLeNt caT", "LisTen cat"));       
}
0
private static boolean checkAnagram(String s1, String s2) {
   if (s1 == null || s2 == null) {
       return false;
   } else if (s1.length() != s2.length()) {
       return false;
   }
   char[] a1 = s1.toCharArray();
   char[] a2 = s2.toCharArray();
   int length = s2.length();
   int s1Count = 0;
   int s2Count = 0;
   for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
       s1Count+=a1[i];
       s2Count+=a2[i];
   }
   return s2Count == s1Count ? true : false;
}
0

The simplest solution with complexity O(N) is using Map.

public static Boolean checkAnagram(String string1, String string2) {
    Boolean anagram = true;

    Map<Character, Integer> map1 = new HashMap<>();
    Map<Character, Integer> map2 = new HashMap<>();


    char[] chars1 = string1.toCharArray();
    char[] chars2 = string2.toCharArray();

    for(int i=0; i<chars1.length; i++) {
        if(map1.get(chars1[i]) == null) {
            map1.put(chars1[i], 1);
        } else {
            map1.put(chars1[i], map1.get(chars1[i])+1);
        }

        if(map2.get(chars2[i]) == null) {
            map2.put(chars2[i], 1);
        } else {
            map2.put(chars2[i], map2.get(chars2[i])+1);
        }
    }

    Set<Map.Entry<Character, Integer>> entrySet1 = map1.entrySet();
    Set<Map.Entry<Character, Integer>> entrySet2 = map2.entrySet();
    for(Map.Entry<Character, Integer> entry:entrySet1) {

        if(entry.getValue() != map2.get(entry.getKey())) {
            anagram = false;
            break;
        }
    }

    return anagram;
}
-1

You should use something like that:

    for (int i...) {
        isFound = false;
        for (int j...) {
            if (...) {
                ...
                isFound = true;
            }
        }

Default value for isFound should be false. Just it

  • n^2 solution though – jb. Feb 23 '13 at 21:19
  • @jb. I was just fixing logical issues – MPogoda Feb 23 '13 at 21:22
  • Brilliant help! Thanks for that! :D – Chilli Feb 24 '13 at 16:58
-1

I know this is an old question. However, I'm hoping this can be of help to someone. The time complexity of this solution is O(n^2).

public boolean areAnagrams(final String word1, final String word2) {
        if (word1.length() != word2.length())
            return false;

        if (word1.equals(word2))
            return true;

        if (word1.length() == 0 && word2.length() == 0)
            return true;

        String secondWord = word2;
        for (int i = 0; i < word1.length(); i++) {
            if (secondWord.indexOf(word1.charAt(i)) == -1)
                return false;

            secondWord = secondWord.replaceFirst(word1.charAt(i) + "", "");
        }

        if (secondWord.length() > 0)
            return false;

        return true;
}
  • Both String.indexOf() and String.replaceFirst() are O(n) operations where n is the length of the string. You can't just "ignore" certain function calls; this is an O(n^2) solution. – dimo414 Jul 26 '15 at 1:48
  • You prompted me to do some research on this. And you are right. My solution has a time complexity of O(n^2). Whereas the String.indexOf(..) might be fast in practice, the String.replaceFirst() seems slower, especially in loops. It can be sped up, though, by using regex directly where a pre-compiled regex pattern is used in the loop. The String.replace*(..) seems to use regex under the hood and actually compiles a new regex pattern on every call. Thanks a lot for pointing this out. – okello Jul 27 '15 at 12:27
-1

Works perfectly! But not a good approach because it runs in O(n^2)

boolean isAnagram(String A, String B) {
    if(A.length() != B.length())
        return false;

   A = A.toLowerCase();
   B = B.toLowerCase();

   for(int i = 0; i < A.length(); i++){
       boolean found = false;
       for(int j = 0; j < B.length(); j++){
           if(A.charAt(i) == B.charAt(j)){
               found = true;
               break;
           }
       }
       if(!found){
           return false;
       }
   }

   for(int i = 0; i < B.length(); i++){
       boolean found = false;
       for(int j = 0; j < A.length(); j++){
           if(A.charAt(j) == B.charAt(i)){
               found = true;
               break;
           }
       }
       if(!found){
           return false;
       }
   }

   int sum1 = 0, sum2 = 0;
   for(int i = 0; i < A.length(); i++){
       sum1 += (int)A.charAt(i);
       sum2 += (int)B.charAt(i);               
   }

   if(sum1 == sum2){
       return true;
   } 
   return false;
}
-1

I had written this program in java. I think this might also help:

public class Anagram {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        checkAnagram("listen", "silent");
    }

    public static void checkAnagram(String str1, String str2) {
        boolean isAnagram = false;
        str1 = sortStr(str1);
        str2 = sortStr(str2);
        if (str1.equals(str2)) {
            isAnagram = true;
        }
        if (isAnagram) {
            System.out.println("Two strings are anagram");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Two string are not anagram");
        }

    }

    public static String sortStr(String str) {
        char[] strArr = str.toCharArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < str.length(); j++) {
                if (strArr[i] > strArr[j]) {
                    char temp = strArr[i];
                    strArr[i] = strArr[j];
                    strArr[j] = temp;
                }
            }
        }
        String output = String.valueOf(strArr);
        return output;
    }
}

protected by Makoto Sep 13 '15 at 18:02

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