4

i can do a recursive function to compute the nth Fibonacci term as follows:

int rec (int i)
{
  if(i == 1 || i == 2)
    return i;
else return rec(i-1)+rec(i-2);

}

But i want to use the golden number which is 1.618 to compute the Fibonacci; but my attempt fails, i get wrong numbers:

int rec (int i)
{
  if(i == 1 || i ==  2)
    return i;

  else return 1.618*rec(i-1);

 }

How can i get it to work?

  • you are casting it to int implicitly, use double – ogzd Feb 23 '13 at 22:55
  • even though, lets say i call rec(6), i get 13.7 instead of 13 – Marwan Tushyeh Feb 23 '13 at 22:56
  • @ogzd Fibonacci numbers are integer, so it should be ok for the last return. The real problem is that for low numbers you can't use the rule just with integers. – Noxbru Feb 23 '13 at 22:57
  • 2
    As answered by Cam below, your programming isn't wrong; your math is. The ratio between numbers in the Fibonacci series asymptotically approaches phi as the numbers get higher, but it's never exactly phi. – Sean D. Feb 23 '13 at 22:58
  • @Noxbru he can always cast back to int , though it will still not be the exact fibonacci nums. – ogzd Feb 23 '13 at 22:59
8

The golden ratio is an irrational number, so you shouldn't necessarily expect to be able to plug an approximation of it into a formula to get an exact result.

If you want to know how to calculate the nth fibonacci number quickly, here is a page that lists a variety of methods in decreasing order of runtime (but increasing in order of implementation difficulty): http://www.nayuki.io/page/fast-fibonacci-algorithms

1

If you are referring to the Binet's Formula, do something like this:

long fib(int i) {
    double phi = // Golden Ratio
    return Math.round((Math.pow(phi, i) - Math.pow(-phi, -i)) / Math.sqrt(5));
}

Note that the above formula is not recursive. I am not aware of any recursive formulas for calculating the fib. sequence using the golden ratio.

  • This will not always return a correct result because phi is actually an irrational number, so this function will only approximate fibonacci numbers (likely with increasing accuracy as you add accuracy to your approximation of phi). – Cam Feb 23 '13 at 23:01
  • Correct. But how would you use the golden ratio? – user000001 Feb 23 '13 at 23:02
  • If given n, you could calculate a maximum required error bound on an approximation of phi required in order to calculate the nth fibonacci number using Binet's formula, then you could use a golden ratio approximation algorithm like this and then plug the result into Binet's. Although I don't know why such an approach would be considered necessary or interesting. – Cam Feb 23 '13 at 23:14
  • @Cam I did a little experiment, and found that the results are correct for n > 44. I wonder if this is proven mathematically also... – user000001 Feb 23 '13 at 23:22
  • Do you mean for n < 44? In my experiment (gist.github.com/cammckinnon/5021833) I found that it only worked for small enough values - not large enough values. – Cam Feb 23 '13 at 23:29
0

Your math appears to be flawed, and you're rounding too often. I used this formula.

This works:

double gr = 1.618033988749895;
int rec (int i)
{
   return (int)round(rec2(i)/(gr+2));
}

double rec2 (int i)
{
  if (i == 1)
    return gr;

  else return gr*rec2(i-1);
}

Also, it doesn't really need to be recursive:

static int rec (int i)
{
  return (int)round(pow(gr, i)/(gr+2);
}

I didn't check too many numbers, but it appears to be quite accurate (Java).

  • again, be careful because since we've approximated the golden ratio here the result will be incorrect. – Cam Feb 23 '13 at 23:05
  • @Cam Made it more accurate (obviously still not exact). – Dukeling Feb 23 '13 at 23:15
  • It will still fail eventually - in fact I checked it with a python script and in this case it seems to fail at 71. gist.github.com/cammckinnon/5021833 (oops - didn't notice you had added your own test :) ) – Cam Feb 23 '13 at 23:28
  • In your test, entry 91 appears to be incorrect. – Cam Feb 23 '13 at 23:40
  • @Cam It's only because the provided golden ratio is an estimate, if I add a few hundred digits and use a library that handles massive precision, it takes a while, but computes correctly. – Dukeling Feb 23 '13 at 23:55
0

This is how you do this:

double gr = 1.618033988749895;
        double FibGoldenRatio(int i)
        {
            if (i == 1 )
                return 1;

            return  Math.Round(gr * FibGoldenRatio(i - 1));

        }

Here Example of output:

1
2
3
5
8
13
21
34
55
89
144
233
377
610
987
1597
2584
4181
6765
10946
17711
28657
46368
75025
121393
196418
317811
514229
832040
1346269
2178309
3524578
5702887
9227465
14930352
24157817
39088169
63245986
102334155
165580141
267914296
433494437
701408733
1134903170
1836311903
2971215073
4807526976
7778742049
12586269025
20365011074
32951280099
53316291173
86267571272
139583862445
225851433717
365435296162
591286729879
956722026041
1548008755920
2504730781961
4052739537881
6557470319842
10610209857723
17167680177565
27777890035288
44945570212853
72723460248141
117669030460994
190392490709135
308061521170129
498454011879264
806515533049393
1.30496954492866E+15
0

You can calculate the golden ratio yourself and use it to find the nth Fibonacci number.

long long fib(int n) {
    double phi = (1 + sqrt(5))/2.0; // golden ratio
    double phi_hat = (1 - sqrt(5))/2.0; // fraction part of golden ratio

    return (pow(phi, n) - pow(phi_hat, n))/sqrt(5);
}

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