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I'm trying to convert a class from an "ordinary" class to a template class, and I don't understand the correct syntax. Below is a (greatly simplified) example of what I'm starting with. This is Visual Studio 2010, C++, targeted to x64 architecture, Windows 7.

The goal is to rewrite class T as a template to handle either TEntry or a new class, OtherTEntry, similar to TEntry in concept, with the same member functions, but having different data members.

I'd appreciate advice on how best to do this. I'd like to keep the header and implementation files separate, if possible. I am particularly stuck on the references to a local variable T *, and how to use sizeof() properly.

In file T.h:

class T
{
    T(void);
    T(G *pGIn, const unsigned long s, char nIn);
    ~T(void);

    // Member functions
    public:
    bool Expand(const unsigned long newS);
    void Empty(void);

    private:
    G *pG;
    char n;
    unsigned long s;
    int f;
    TEntry *p;
};

In file TEntry.h:

class TEntry
{
    // Constructors
    public:
    TEntry();
    TEntry(int l);

    // Member functions
    public:
    void Relocate(int delta);

private:

    // Data members
    int k;
    TEntry *p;
};

In file T.cpp:

T::T()
{
    p=NULL; s=0; pG=NULL;
    Empty();
    return;
}

T::T(G *pGIn, const unsigned long m, char nIn)
{
    pG=pG; n=nIn;
    return;
}

T::~T(void)
{
    if(p!=NULL)
        delete[] p;
    return;
}

bool T::Expand(const unsigned long newS)
{
    T *pBefore=p;
    p=(T *)_realloc_dbg(p, newS*sizeof(T), _NORMAL_BLOCK,__FILE__,__LINE__);
    s=newS;
    return p!=NULL;
}

void T::Empty()
{
    f=0;
    return;
}

In file TEntry.cpp:

T::T()
{
}

T::T(int i)
{
    k=i;
}

void T::Relocate(int delta)
{
    k+=delta;
    return;
}
3
  • Calling a class T is a really bad choice. Please post what you tried, hard to tell what you did wrong when you don't show it.
    – Mat
    Feb 24, 2013 at 8:00
  • Is there any reason for not using std::vector?
    – n. m.
    Feb 24, 2013 at 8:45
  • Rest assured, my actual class is not named T. I have a complete, working pair of classes now, but I show only a small part of my code, just enough to ask my question.
    – Woody20
    Feb 24, 2013 at 17:47

3 Answers 3

1

The easiest way is to start with a complete, working,non-template version of T that is written in terms of one of the types that you later want to use in the template (obvious choice here: TEntry).

Once you have a working implementation, you can transform it to a template.

  1. Choose a name for your template parameter. The usual name for a type-parameter is T, but that name is already taken in your project, so I will use U.
  2. Replace all occurrences of TEntry within T by the name of your template parameter (U)
  3. Add the template header to the class definition of T:

    template <class U>
    class T {
      //...
    
  4. Add the template header to each member of T that is defined outside the class definition:

    template <class U>
    «return type» T<U>::«member specification» //...
    
  5. Ensure all template code is in the header file (either directly, or indirectly through a #include directive. Separate compilation of headers and sources is not supported for templates.
1
  • Thanks you, this comment is most helpful. I do already have working implementations of T and TEntry. As far as "separate compilation", that isn't what I'm aiming for, just separate files. The effect of #include is to combine the header with the implementation file.
    – Woody20
    Feb 24, 2013 at 17:55
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I'd like to keep the header and implementation files separate

While it's possible to do this, it's a bit of a nightmare. It's usually best to keep all parts of a template together.

What you probably want is something like this:

template< typename TYPE > class T
{
    // ...
    TYPE* p;
};

You can then use sizeof( TYPE ).

One thing you cannot do, and should never ever do is mix realloc with new and delete. C++ does not support reallocation of memory allocated with new and delete. Instead it has containers such as std::vector that manage memory for you.

And, as has been mentioned, one letter class and variables names are not a good idea. :)

3
  • I will have to check this use of realloc. In Visual Studio, the 'new' operator uses malloc.
    – Woody20
    Feb 24, 2013 at 17:53
  • Doesn't matter what it may or may not use internally. You cannot safely mix C (malloc/realloc/free) and C++ (new/delete) memory allocation strategies.
    – user420442
    Feb 24, 2013 at 18:57
  • What is unsafe about mixing them? Portability is not an issue in this case.
    – Woody20
    Feb 24, 2013 at 19:58
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In general, it is preferred to keep template code in .h files. If absolutely necessary, it is possible to put the implementation in the .cpp file, please consult C++ Templates: The Complete Guide by David Vandevoorde and Nicolai M. Josuttis, Chaprer 6, for details.

You can go like this (cut down less important details):

template <class T>
class YourClass
{
    YourClass()
       : p(NULL), s(0), pG(NULL)
    {
       Empty();
    }

    YourClass(G *pGIn, const unsigned long s, char nIn)
    {
       // ... implementation here
    }
    ~YourClass()
    {
        if(p!=NULL)
           delete p;
    }


public:
    bool Expand(const unsigned long newS)
    {
        T *pBefore=p;
        p=(T *)_realloc_dbg(p, newS*sizeof(T), _NORMAL_BLOCK,__FILE__,__LINE__);
        s=newS;
        return p!=NULL;
    }


private:
    G *pG;
    char n;
    unsigned long s;
    int f;
    T* p;
};

Few notes:

  • Naming your class template T is really a bad idea because it is a common practice to use T for template parameter names.
  • Regarding the sizeof, in your code example it is not applied to the template, but to a usual class, anyway, there shouldn't be any problem using sizeof on a class, class template or a template parameter.

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