184

I'm trying to create and use a custom package in Go. It's probably something very obvious but I cannot find much information about this. Basically, I have these two files in the same folder:

mylib.go

package mylib

type SomeType struct {

}

main.go

package main

import (
    "mylib"
)

func main() {

}

When I try to go run main.go, I get this error:

main.go:4:2: import "mylib": cannot find package

I've tried to run go build mylib.go first but it doesn't seem to be doing anything (no file generated, no error message). So any idea how I could do this?

4
  • I didn't set a GOPATH variable, only GOROOT. – laurent Feb 24 '13 at 8:21
  • 1
    run go install under the directory of mylib first, and try again. – Joe Feb 24 '13 at 9:06
  • 1
    See also this thread. – kostix Feb 24 '13 at 11:14
  • @Joe, it still can't work by running "go install" inside – hunter_tech Feb 14 '20 at 3:20
179

First, be sure to read and understand the "How to write Go code" document.

The actual answer depends on the nature of your "custom package".

If it's intended to be of general use, consider employing the so-called "Github code layout". Basically, you make your library a separate go get-table project.

If your library is for internal use, you could go like this:

  1. Place the directory with library files under the directory of your project.
  2. In the rest of your project, refer to the library using its path relative to the root of your workspace containing the project.

To demonstrate:

src/
  myproject/
    mylib/
      mylib.go
      ...
    main.go

Now, in the top-level main.go, you could import "myproject/mylib" and it would work OK.

9
  • 1
    If I create a new project (myproject2) under src/, how could I import mylib? – Kiril Apr 14 '14 at 13:04
  • 3
    @Kiril, you mean, how do you import mylib in the code of myproject2? Then the answer is "by using import "myproject/mylib" -- the idea is that Go searches for imported paths under each directory it extracts from the GOPATH environment variable (they are called "workspaces"), but this search is (luckily) not recursive, so such paths are effectively "anchored" at their respective workspaces. – kostix Apr 14 '14 at 17:00
  • 4
    Another must-have read: "Package names". – kostix Dec 6 '15 at 10:02
  • 1
    @MatthiasSommer, typically—by extracting that mylib into a common package each microservice uses. Exactly how "uses" is defined, depends on your preferred workflow. In enterprise-grade development, vendoring is typically used, but with the recent go mod developments, a module might be the answer (and go mod supports vendoring of modules as well). – kostix May 15 '19 at 15:33
  • 1
    @LeiYang, "the package to be imported" is a directory with one or more Go source files. As to "how to build package to a .lib file" and then import the lib file"—the answer depends on what you really intended to ask for. If you're concerned with compilation speed, then fear not: the Go toolchain caches all build results on a per-package basis. If, instead, you wanted to ask whether it's possible to compile and distribute a binary-only compiled package, then the answer is no. – kostix Aug 30 '19 at 8:48
71

For this kind of folder structure:

main.go
mylib/
  mylib.go

The simplest way is to use this:

import (
    "./mylib"
)
5
  • 1
    This does not work anymore in recent versions of go as the package will not be found. The correct import would be foo/mylib (assuming the folder containing main.go is foo). – nemo Aug 27 '13 at 0:51
  • 6
    @nemo, with the latest version of go, I always use "./mylib" and it works. – laurent Aug 27 '13 at 3:49
  • 3
    Using go 1.2 and I agree with @this.lau_ – canadadry Mar 17 '14 at 20:30
  • 8
    Be aware that this makes go install break. If you're building a standalone project that you want people to download and run go build on, this is fine--however, I would employ the "Github code layout" mentioned above (even if off bitbucket, or similar) if you want full go install support. – photoionized Apr 10 '14 at 17:24
  • I suggestionDo not use this way. It's will breaking godef. godef it does not understand about "." imports – King Jk Mar 2 '17 at 7:11
6

For a project hosted on GitHub, here's what people usually do:

github.com/
  laike9m/
    myproject/
      mylib/
        mylib.go
        ...
      main.go

mylib.go

package mylib

...

main.go

import "github.com/laike9m/myproject/mylib"

...
6

I am an experienced programmer, but, quite new into Go world ! And I confess I've faced few difficulties to understand Go... I faced this same problem when trying to organize my go files in sub-folders. The way I did it :

GO_Directory ( the one assigned to $GOPATH )

GO_Directory //the one assigned to $GOPATH
__MyProject
_____ main.go
_____ Entites
_____ Fiboo // in my case, fiboo is a database name
_________ Client.go // in my case, Client is a table name

On File MyProject\Entities\Fiboo\Client.go

package Fiboo

type Client struct{
    ID int
    name string
}

on file MyProject\main.go

package main

import(
    Fiboo "./Entity/Fiboo" 
)

var TableClient  Fiboo.Client

func main(){
    TableClient.ID = 1
    TableClient.name = 'Hugo'

    // do your things here
}

( I am running Go 1.9 on Ubuntu 16.04 )

And remember guys, I am newbie on Go. If what I am doing is bad practice, let me know !

2

another solution:
add src/myproject to $GOPATH.

Then import "mylib" will compile.

1
  • this will not work for go gettable paths such as github hosted packages. – Gustav Apr 28 '16 at 10:50
1

I try so many ways but the best I use go.mod and put

module nameofProject.com

and then i import from same project I use

import("nameofProject.com/folder")

It's very useful to create project in any place

0

For those who face this problem, you need to first initialize the go module before you can use custom package.

For example your code directory is: ../mycode/main.go. Now you want to create diffcode custom package and import it into main. You will first need to run the command go mod init mycode (make sure you are under ../mycode directory). Now you create package diffcode and it has some files. To import this package, you need to put this into main.go: module/package. In this case, mycode/diffcode.

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