66

Is there a short way to say "entire string" rather than typing out:

NSMakeRange(0, myString.length)]

It seems silly that the longest part of this kind of code is the least important (because I usually want to search/replace within entire string)…

[myString replaceOccurrencesOfString:@"replace_me"
                          withString:replacementString
                             options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch
                               range:NSMakeRange(0, myString.length)];
1
  • If you need more than 5 times, then you can make a method/category, But for under 5 time your NSMakeRange(0, myString.length)] will be shorter, isn't it? – Anoop Vaidya Feb 25 '13 at 8:08
46

Function? Category method?

- (NSRange)fullRange
{
    return (NSRange){0, [self length]};
}

[myString replaceOccurrencesOfString:@"replace_me"
                          withString:replacementString
                             options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch
                               range:[myString fullRange]];
3
  • 9
    Hah. Awesome that we both named it fullRange, and that we both used the new compound literals, at the same time. – BJ Homer Feb 25 '13 at 8:04
  • 3
    Indeed. And commented at the same time! – jscs Feb 25 '13 at 8:05
  • The literals work just fine, but you could also do return NSMakeRange(0, [self length]); if you wanted. – Brian Sachetta Jun 1 '15 at 15:14
20

Not that I know of. But you could easily add an NSString category:

@interface NSString (MyRangeExtensions)
- (NSRange)fullRange
@end

@implementation NSString (MyRangeExtensions)
- (NSRange)fullRange {
  return (NSRange){0, self.length};
}
1
  • 4
    Geez, we even gave it the same name. – jscs Feb 25 '13 at 8:04
20

Swift 4+, useful for NSRegularExpression and NSAttributedString

extension String {
    var nsRange : NSRange {
        return NSRange(self.startIndex..., in: self)
    }

    func range(from nsRange: NSRange) -> Range<String.Index>? {
        return Range(nsRange, in: self)
    }
}
15

Swift

NSMakeRange(0, str.length)

or as an extension:

extension NSString {
    func fullrange() -> NSRange {
        return NSMakeRange(0, self.length)
    }
}
3
  • 3
    Correct. But the question is "Shortcut to generate an NSRange for entire length of NSString" – SwiftArchitect Jan 19 '17 at 18:16
  • 3
    The question is also about Objective-C. If you use Swift, then also use String. – Tim Vermeulen Aug 3 '17 at 15:16
  • 1
    NSString may be obsolete in Swift, but NSAttributedString isn't, and the same code works for it (aside from the class name, obviously). – John Montgomery Oct 10 '18 at 22:55
7

This is not shorter, but... Oh well

NSRange range = [str rangeOfString:str];
4
  • 7
    Clever. But I hesitate to introduce what could be a lot of CPU work (matching a long string against itself) for the relatively small benefit of a little less typing for me the programmer. – Basil Bourque Feb 25 '13 at 8:19
  • And you are right, sometimes a little bit more of code makes it more readable and efficient. – Odrakir Feb 25 '13 at 8:30
  • I used this as well and ran into a problem: if your string happens to be empty (@""), you get {NSNotFound, 0}. – Shinigami May 8 '14 at 12:52
  • This function only parse valid ranges as @"{0, 13}" etc, it will not create NSRange for full length of string, if string does not contain valid range, but rather random string, it returns {0,0} range. nshipster.com/nsrange – Ossir Feb 6 '15 at 12:26
6

Swift 2:

extension String {
    var fullRange:Range<String.Index> { return startIndex..<endIndex }
}

as in

let swiftRange = "abc".fullRange

or

let nsRange = "abc".fullRange.toRange
1
  • 1
    For "abc".fullRange.toRange, I get the compile time error: "Value of type 'Range<String.Index>' (aka 'Range<String.CharacterView.Index>') has no member 'toRange'." I'm running Xcode 8.3.3 with Swift 3.1. – ma11hew28 Aug 12 '17 at 15:57

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