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While learning Javascript, I tried to re-declare the apply property of a function. Thus far no problem.

function foo() { return 1; }
alert(foo()); // 1
alert(foo.apply(null)); // 1
foo.apply = function () { return 2; }
alert(foo()); // 1
alert(foo.apply(null)); // 2

Now, I tried to make apply do something more and call the "old" apply (like logging).

var old = foo.apply;
foo.apply = function() {
   alert("A");
   return old(null);
}
alert(foo.apply(null));

I get

TypeError: Function.prototype.apply was called on [object Window], which is a object and not a function


I tried

foo.apply = function() {
   alert("A");
   return arguments.callee[Function.prototype.apply](null);
}
alert(foo.apply(null));

I get

TypeError: Property 'function apply() { [native code] }' of object function () { alert("A"); return arguments.calleeFunction.prototype.apply; } is not a function


Is there any real way to accomplice what I try? Or is it some restriction due to Function.prototype.apply being native code?

  • It works fine for me in chrome... – loxxy Feb 25 '13 at 15:15
  • @Ioxxy which version? The output I pasted is from Chrome's console :/ – George Kastrinis Feb 25 '13 at 15:16
  • Your first solution works with Chrome (v25). What browser are you using? – Y__ Feb 25 '13 at 15:17
  • I did something similar to add support of Array like objects as parameter for Browsers that don't support it. But i don't have the code right here, so i'll post later. – t.niese Feb 25 '13 at 15:18
3

Yes. apply expects to be applyed (yes, with exactly itself) on a function, while the way you used it (by old()) makes its this value the global object (window). So you can do this:

var old = foo.apply; // === Function.prototype.apply
foo.apply = function() {
    // "this" is the function foo
    alert("A");
    return old.apply(this, arguments); // applying the (old) apply function on foo
    // or better without any arguments:
    return old.call(this); // like this(); which is foo()
}
alert(foo.apply(null));

// and the call solution with an argument:
foo.apply = function(context) {
    return old.call(this, context);
    // like this.call(context);
    // which is foo.call(context)
    // which is like context.foo()
}

Also check out the docs for the call and apply "methods" (though we've use old not as a method, but as a pure function).

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