61

What benefits arise from naming a function's return parameter(s)?

func namedReturn(i int) (ret int) {
    ret = i
    i += 2
    return
}

func anonReturn(i int) int {
    ret := i
    i += 2
    return ret
}
1
  • To add to the answer from @thomaskappler and the discussion there (I can't comment yet), you can use named result parameters and also specify variables in your return. This provides the benefit of documentation but removes the shadowing concerns. However, it does eliminate the >If you have multiple return sites, you don't need to change them all if you change the function's return values since it will just say "return". benefit.
    – ddrake12
    May 25, 2017 at 20:10

4 Answers 4

63

There are some benefits to naming them:

  • It serves as documentation.
  • They are auto-declared and initialized to the zero values.
  • If you have multiple return sites, you don't need to change them all if you change the function's return values since it will just say "return".

There are also downsides, mainly that it's easy to accidentally shadow them by declaring a variable of the same name.


Effective Go has a section on named result parameters:

The return or result "parameters" of a Go function can be given names and used as regular variables, just like the incoming parameters. When named, they are initialized to the zero values for their types when the function begins; if the function executes a return statement with no arguments, the current values of the result parameters are used as the returned values.

The names are not mandatory but they can make code shorter and clearer: they're documentation. If we name the results of nextInt it becomes obvious which returned int is which.

func nextInt(b []byte, pos int) (value, nextPos int) {

[...]

4
  • 17
    Shadowing is a major issue. I often have something like this: i, err := strconv.Atoi(...). i is a local variable, but I want err to be a return value. To get this to work, I have to declare i before and not use :=
    – beatgammit
    Mar 9, 2013 at 12:07
  • 1
    "They are auto-declared and initialized to the zero values." - I do not see how this is a benefit. In general, it's very strange and outright risky that Golang takes the liberty of returning a value from a metod and expect the client code to know that this is the default value returned automatically in case no other value is returned.
    – luqo33
    Mar 25, 2017 at 15:56
  • @luqo33 (your comment is from a while ago but....) it's not really "taking the liberty of returning a value" -- you still need to provide a return stmt even with named results. And if, instead of a named result, I declared at the top of the func a variable var x typeFoo and at the end put a return x stmt without x ever having been explicitly set, then the function would also be returning the default zero value for typeFoo. Solely in terms of your concern, I don't think using named results is behaving differently from how the rest of golang works.
    – xgord
    Oct 17, 2018 at 15:38
  • The shadowing occurs only when you re-declare it in a nested scope {} of the function.
    – Eric
    May 7, 2021 at 3:05
25

Another special use for a named return variable is to be captured by a deferred function literal. A trivial illustration:

package main

import (
    "errors"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    fmt.Println(f())
}

var harmlessError = errors.New("you should worry!")

func f() (err error) {
    defer func() {
        if err == harmlessError {
            err = nil
        }
    }()
    return harmlessError
}

Output is <nil>. In more practical scenarios, the deferred function may handle panics, and may modify other return values besides an error result. The magic in common though, is that the deferred literal has a chance to modify the return values of f after f is terminated, either normally or by panic.

1
  • 1
    will f() not work the same way even if err was declared locally inside f() and then used by defer? => func f() (err error) {} @sonia Oct 20, 2015 at 11:19
4

It's useful in at least two cases:

  1. Whenever you have to declare variables that you're going to return. E.g.

    func someFunc() (int, error) {
        var r int
        var e error
        ok := someOtherFunc(&r)  // contrived, I admit
        if !ok {
            return r, someError()
        }
        return r, nil
    }
    

    vs.

    func someFunc() (r int, e error) {
        ok := someOtherFunc(&r)
        if !ok {
            e = someError()
        }
        return
    }
    

    This gets more important as the number of execution paths through the function increases.

  2. When you're documenting return values and want to refer to them by name. godoc considers the return variables part of a function's signature.

1
  • 1
    e is unused in the first example. Sep 8, 2018 at 14:33
2

For example, named return parameters are accessible by, well, name.

func foo() (a, b, c T) {
        // ...
        if qux {
                b = bar()
        }
        // ...
        return
}

This is not easy to replicate w/o named return parameters. One would have to introduce local variables of essentially the same functionality as named return parameters:

func foo() (T, T, T) {
        var a, b, c T
        // ...
        if qux {
                b = bar()
        }
        // ...
        return a, b, c
}

So it's easier to allow that directly.

Additionally, they are accessible also in the other direction:

func foo() (a, b, c T) {
        // ...
        if a > c {
                b = bar()
        }
        // ...
        return
}

Etc.

1
  • What do you mean by “other direction”? Sep 8, 2018 at 14:35

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