21

Is it safe to:

public class Widget {

    private static final IllegalStateException LE_EXCEPTION
            = new IllegalStateException("le sophisticated way");

    ...

   public void fun() {
      // some logic here, that may throw
      throw LE_EXCEPTION;
   }

   ....
}
  1. keep an instance of an exception
  2. use it whenever needed (throw)

instead of throwing a new exception each time?

I am interested if it's safe

By safe I mean: no memory corruption, no additional exceptions thrown by JVM, by missing classes, no bad classes loaded (...). Note: the exception will be thrown over network (remoting).

Other issues (readability, cost of keeping an instance) are not important.

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  • 2
    I think it's redundant. unless you code throws it very often – PermGenError Feb 26 '13 at 13:44
  • It always have a instance of exception, even your code doesn't throws a exception – nav0611 Feb 26 '13 at 13:45
20

It depends on your definition of "safe." The exception will give a misleading stack trace, which I wouldn't call "safe". Consider:

public class ThrowTest {
    private static Exception e = new Exception("t1"); // Line 2

    public static final void main(String[] args) {
        ThrowTest tt;

        tt = new ThrowTest();
        try {
            tt.t1();
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("t1:");
            ex.printStackTrace(System.out);
        }
        try {
            tt.t2();                                  // Line 16
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("t2:");
            ex.printStackTrace(System.out);
        }
    }

    private void t1() 
    throws Exception {
        throw this.e;
    }

    private void t2() 
    throws Exception {
        throw new Exception("t2");                    // Line 31
    }
}

That has this output:

$ java ThrowTest
t1:
java.lang.Exception: t1
    at ThrowTest.<clinit>(ThrowTest.java:2)
t2:
java.lang.Exception: t2
    at ThrowTest.t2(ThrowTest.java:31)
    at ThrowTest.main(ThrowTest.java:16)

Note how the t1 method is completely missing from the stack trace in the first test case. There's no useful context information at all.

Now, you can use fillInStackTrace to fill in that information just before the throw:

this.e.fillInStackTrace();
throw this.e;

...but that's just making work for yourself (work you will forget sometimes). There's simply no benefit to it at all. And not all exceptions allow you to do it (some exceptions make the stack trace read-only).


You've said elsewhere in the comments that this is to avoid "code duplication." You're much better off having an exception builder function:

private IllegalStateException buildISE() {
    return new IllegalStateException("le sophisticated way");
}

(Could be static final if you like.)

And then throwing it like this:

throw buildISE();

That avoids code duplication without misleading stack traces and unnecessary Exception instances.

Here's what that looks like applied to the above:

public class ThrowTest {

    public static final void main(String[] args) {
        ThrowTest tt;

        tt = new ThrowTest();
        try {
            tt.t1();                                   // Line 8
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("t1:");
            ex.printStackTrace(System.out);
        }
        try {
            tt.t2();                                   // Line 15
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("t2:");
            ex.printStackTrace(System.out);
        }
    }

    private static final Exception buildEx() {
        return new Exception("t1");                    // Line 24
    }

    private void t1() 
    throws Exception {
        throw buildEx();                               // Line 29
    }

    private void t2() 
    throws Exception {
        throw new Exception("t2");                     // Line 34
    }
}
$ java ThrowTest
t1:
java.lang.Exception: t1
    at ThrowTest.buildEx(ThrowTest.java:24)
    at ThrowTest.t1(ThrowTest.java:29)
    at ThrowTest.main(ThrowTest.java:8)
t2:
java.lang.Exception: t2
    at ThrowTest.t2(ThrowTest.java:34)
    at ThrowTest.main(ThrowTest.java:15)
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  • I like your idea. Can you write line numbers in your code so that the stacktrace is easy to understand here, on SE ? – Joshua MN Feb 26 '13 at 13:59
  • I think the first stack example was better! – Joshua MN Feb 26 '13 at 14:02
  • 1
    @JoshuaMN: The update makes it more like your proposed mechanism (the static exception). I've updated with line numbers and an example of how the builder function makes the stack trace more readable. – T.J. Crowder Feb 26 '13 at 14:05
  • One last question: do you know when is the stacktrace inserted into the exception? During creation (new ..) ? I now have also thought of a different issue: what if an exception is mutable? Now this would be ... FUBAR. – Joshua MN Feb 26 '13 at 14:20
  • 1
    @JoshuaMN: From the docs: "A throwable contains a snapshot of the execution stack of its thread at the time it was created." (Throwable is the root of exceptions.) That's why the code above behaves the way it does, and provides no context if you pre-create the exception. That said, you can call fillInStackTrace to overwrite that, but that means more rather than less work if you pre-create (and some exceptions don't allow it). – T.J. Crowder Feb 26 '13 at 14:30
6

It is not safe, unless the exception is immutable (i.e. enableSuppression=writableStackTrace=false).

If an exception is not immutable, it can be modified by a catcher - setting a new stacktrace or adding a suppressed exception. If there are multiple catchers trying to modify the exception, there'll be chaos.

Astonishingly, Throwable is actually thread-safe, for god-knows-what. So at least there won't be catastrophic failure if an exception is modified by multiple threads. But there will be logic failure.

Memory leak is also possible, if app keeps adding suppressed exceptions to this long-live exception.

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  • This answer gives the most important info. Thanks! – Stepan Vavra May 6 '16 at 15:18
3

One more reason not to do it is that the stack trace will be inappropriate.

No matter in what place in your code you throw the exception, when its stack trace is printed, it'll show the line where the exception is initialized instead of the line where it is being thrown (in this particular case instead of expected Widget.fun() the stack trace will contain Widget.<clinit>).

So you (or whoever uses your code) won't be able to determine where the error actually lies.

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2

It think it can cause problems when reading the exception's stack trace. The stack trace is filled when code throws exception but is stored into the instance of the exception itself. If you throw the same instance of exception twice I think that getStackTrace() returns the last stack trace. If for some reason (e.g. in multithreaded environment) exception is thrown twice from different places in code and then is printed the stack trace from first throwing may be wrong.

Since there is no reason to re-use instances of the exception I do not recommend you to do so.

If you want to use exception as a kind of container that holds additional information (e.g. error message, error code etc) use the fact that exception is serializable: clone it before throwing. So, every time you will throw unique instance of the exception but its fields will be copied from pre-created template.

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2

It isn't safe to get fancy with any error-handling code. Keep it simple, keep it obvious, and don't write any thing you need to ask questions about. Error handling is no place to be incurring extra errors.

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1

I think this is wrong, because it will encourage you to use use exceptions to describe normal situations, and no just exceptional ones. See Effective Java second edition by J. Bloch, item 57, page 241.

Also you are always keeping an object in the heap, so this is not necessary, because object creation is very fast in moder JVMs and also once an exception is thrown it will be probably very quickly garbage collected.

Also your code could become very misleading, this adding a lot of overhead for something pretty strait forward.

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  • Please disregard coding style. I need the instance to avoid code duplication (I need to handle a lot of exceptions and throw a different one) – Joshua MN Feb 26 '13 at 13:53
  • @JoshuaMN you should throw exceptions where they are needed, if you want you could abstract the code away in a method that does that, if you suspect that your Exception type will change, but be sure to do this with unchecked exceptions, to save you a lot of changes in catch/throws clauses. If throwing exception is something "normal" for your application you should think of something else to modify program flow instead of throwing exceptions, like I said exceptions should be used only of exceptional situations. – comanitza Feb 26 '13 at 13:56

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