26

I am using boost 1.46 which does not include boost::timer, What other way can I time my functions.

I am currently doing this:

time_t now = time(0);
<some stuff>
time_t after = time(0);

cout << after - now << endl; 

but it just gives the answer in seconds, so if the function takes < 1s it displays 0.

Thanks

  • 7
    std::chrono?? – Pubby Feb 26 '13 at 15:09
  • 1
    @Pubby is right, if you have access to C++11, std::chrono is the way to go. – Xymostech Feb 26 '13 at 15:10
  • What is your target platform? Win32? Linux? – Chad Feb 26 '13 at 15:12
  • I am using Ubuntu, with the G++ compiler – Aly Feb 26 '13 at 15:13
  • 1
    Boost 1.46 does not include boost::timer... are you sure? I haven't tested, but there is documentation for timer in 1.46.0: boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_0/libs/timer/timer.htm – jogojapan Feb 26 '13 at 15:13
29

In linux or Windows:

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>

int
main(int, const char**)
{
     std::clock_t    start;

     start = std::clock();
     // your test
     std::cout << "Time: " << (std::clock() - start) / (double)(CLOCKS_PER_SEC / 1000) << " ms" << std::endl;
     return 0;
}

Good Luck ;)

  • 19
    Be aware that this measures CPU time, not elapsed time. E.g. if the function sleeps this will not be measured. – Étienne Jun 18 '14 at 9:54
  • 1
    That's CPU time, there will be problems when sleep or multithreading – Fei Jiang Sep 20 '14 at 13:14
  • If you do want CPU time, you should use clock_gettime and specify whether you want process time or thread time, or use getrusage and specify if you want to include children. – o11c May 7 '16 at 17:55
23

Using std::chrono:

#include <chrono>
#include <thread>
#include <iostream>

// There are other clocks, but this is usually the one you want.
// It corresponds to CLOCK_MONOTONIC at the syscall level.
using Clock = std::chrono::steady_clock;
using std::chrono::time_point;
using std::chrono::duration_cast;
using std::chrono::milliseconds;
using namespace std::literals::chrono_literals;
using std::this_thread::sleep_for;

int main()
{
    time_point<Clock> start = Clock::now();
    sleep_for(500ms);
    time_point<Clock> end = Clock::now();
    milliseconds diff = duration_cast<milliseconds>(end - start);
    std::cout << diff.count() << "ms" << std::endl;
}

std::chrono is C++11, std::literals is C++14 (otherwise you need milliseconds(500)).

9

Turns out there is a version of time in boost 1.46 (just in different location). Thanks to @jogojapan for pointing it out.

It can be done like this:

#include <boost/timer.hpp>

timer t;
<some stuff>
std::cout << t.elapsed() << std::endl;

Or alternatively using std libs as @Quentin Perez has pointed out (and I will accept as is what was originally asked)

  • 7
    The question title said 'without boost::timer' – Progo Sep 12 '14 at 2:24
  • 6
    @Progo More specifically, the question says using boost 1.46 is ok. (Note that this answer is given by the author of the original question) – SebastianK Apr 10 '15 at 8:58
3

Building on Quentin Perez's solution, you can pass an arbitrary function to time using std::function and a lambda.

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

void timeit(std::function<void()> func) {
    std::clock_t start = std::clock();

    func();

    int ms = (std::clock() - start) / (double) (CLOCKS_PER_SEC / 1000);

    std::cout << "Finished in " << ms << "ms" << std::endl;
}

int main() {
    timeit([] {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
            std::cout << "i = " << i << std::endl;
        } 
    });

    return 0;
}
2

You can use a long to hold the current time value as a start value, and then convert the current time to a double. here is some snippet code to use as an example.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/timeb.h>
int main()
{

struct      _timeb tStruct;
double      thisTime;
bool        done = false;
long        startTime;

 struct _timeb
 {
 int   dstflag;   // holds a non-zero value if daylight saving time is in effect
 long  millitm;   // time in milliseconds since the last one-second hack
 long  time;      // time in seconds since 00:00:00 1/1/1970
 long  timezone;  // difference in minutes moving west from UTC

 };

  _ftime(&tStruct); // Get start time

thisTime = tStruct.time + (((double)(tStruct.millitm)) / 1000.0); // Convert to double
startTime = thisTime;                                             // Set the starting time (when the function begins)


while(!done)     // Start an eternal loop
    {
    system("cls");  // Clear the screen
    _ftime(&tStruct);    // Get the current time
    thisTime = tStruct.time + (((double)(tStruct.millitm)) / 1000.0); // Convert to double
    // Check for 5 second interval to print status to screen
    cout << thisTime-startTime; // Print it. 

    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.