9

Is there some trick that would allow one to use bc (or some other standard utility) to return the standard deviation of an arbitrary number of numbers? For convenience, let's say that the numbers are stored in a Bash variable in the following way:

myNumbers="0.556
1.456
45.111
7.812
5.001"

So, the answer I'm looking for would be in a form such as the following:

standardDeviation="$(echo "${myNumbers}" | <insert magic here>)"
12

Using :

standardDeviation=$(
    echo "$myNumbers" |
        awk '{sum+=$1; sumsq+=$1*$1}END{print sqrt(sumsq/NR - (sum/NR)**2)}'
)
echo $standardDeviation

Using :

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use Math::NumberCruncher;

my @data = qw/
    0.556
    1.456
    45.111
    7.812
    5.001
/;

print Math::NumberCruncher::StandardDeviation(\@data);

Output

16.7631
| improve this answer | |
  • That's a nice little awk cycle there and, naturally, one can't argue against the sensibility of using Perl here. Thanks for your help! – d3pd Feb 27 '13 at 12:22
  • I get 'syntax error at or near *' because of the **2, replacing it with *(sum/NR) fixes this. – user1544337 Mar 9 '16 at 19:04
  • Nice. A note that this is population standard deviation vs sample standard deviation... – dawg Aug 1 '17 at 17:44
5

Population standard deviation:

jq -s '(add/length)as$a|map(pow(.-$a;2))|add/length|sqrt'
ruby -e'a=readlines.map(&:to_f);puts (a.map{|x|(x-a.reduce(:+)/a.length)**2}.reduce(:+)/a.length)**0.5'
jq -s '(map(.*.)|add/length)-pow(add/length;2)|sqrt'
awk '{x+=$0;y+=$0^2}END{print sqrt(y/NR-(x/NR)^2)}'

In awk, ^ is in POSIX but ** is not. ** is supported by gawk and nawk but not by mawk.

Sample standard deviation (the first two commands are the same as the first two commands above, but length was replaced with length-1):

jq -s '(add/length)as$a|map(pow(.-$a;2))|add/(length-1)|sqrt'
ruby -e'a=readlines.map(&:to_f);puts (a.map{|x|(x-a.reduce(:+)/a.length)**2}.reduce(:+)/(a.length-1))**0.5'
R -q -e 'sd(scan("stdin"))'
| improve this answer | |
4

Or use GNU Octave (which can much more than simple std):

standardDeviation="$(echo "${myNumbers}" | octave --eval 'disp(std(scanf("%f")))')"
echo $standardDeviation

Outputs

18.742
| improve this answer | |
  • At least on my system, the octave command briefly launches a graphical application named octave-gui unless I add the --no-window-system flag. You can replace std(scanf("%f")) with std(scanf("%f"),1) to calculate the population standard deviation instead of the sample standard deviation. – nisetama Mar 20 '19 at 5:58
  • 1
    @nisetama the GUI is default since GNU Octave 4.0.x and was changed back for Octave 5.0.x – Andy Mar 20 '19 at 6:28
1

Given:

$ myNumbers=$(echo "0.556 1.456 45.111 7.812 5.001" | tr " " "\n")

First decide if you need sample standard deviation vs population standard deviation of those numbers.

Population standard deviation (the function STDEV.P in Excel) requires the entire population of datum. In Excel, text or blanks are skipped.

It is easily calculated on a rolling basis in awk:

$ echo "$myNumbers" | awk '$1+0==$1 {sum+=$1; sumsq+=$1*$1; cnt++}
                           END{print sumsq/cnt; print sqrt(sumsq/cnt - (sum/cnt)**2)}'
16.7631

Or in Ruby:

$ echo "$myNumbers" | ruby -e 'arr=$<.read.split(/\s/).map { |e| Float(e) rescue nil }.compact
                             sumsq=arr.inject(0) { |acc, e| acc+=e*e }
                             p (sumsq/arr.length - (arr.sum/arr.length)**2)**0.5'
16.76307799182477

For a sample standard deviation (the function STDEV.S in Excel and ignoring text or blanks) You need to have the entire sample collected first since the mean is used against each value in the sample.

In awk:

$ echo "$myNumbers" | 
     awk 'function sdev(array) {
     for (i=1; i in array; i++)
        sum+=array[i]
     cnt=i-1
     mean=sum/cnt
     for (i=1; i in array; i++)  
        sqdif+=(array[i]-mean)**2
     return (sqdif/(cnt-1))**0.5
     }
     $1+0==$1 {sum1[++cnt]=$1} 
     END {print sdev(sum1)}' 
18.7417

Or in Ruby:

$ ruby -lane 'BEGIN{col1=[]}
            col1 << Float($F[0]) rescue nil
            END {col1.compact
                 mean=col1.sum / col1.length
                 p (col1.inject(0){ |acc, e| acc+(e-mean)**2 } / 
                        (col1.length-1))**0.5
              }' <(echo "$myNumbers")
18.741690950925424
| improve this answer | |

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