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I'm trying to work out a very simple RSA algorithm with my own numbers, but I seem to be running into problems.

I chose prime numbers 13 and 17, giving me a modulus of 221. φ(221)=12∗16=192 I then chose public exponent r=19, and using the extended euclidean algorithm I found private exponent s=91. (19⋅91=1 mod 192)

Now I encrypt my message 42 as: 42^19 mod 221=172. Decrypting using 172^91 mod 221 does indeed return the original of 42. However, if I use 19 as exponent (172^19 mod 221), I also get back 42, which is clearly not what is supposed to happen. Where did I go wrong?

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  • it is coincidence only... – Devendra Feb 27 '13 at 10:00
  • when choose prime and exponent for RSA you must consider the attacks against RSA. so you should choose right inter to avoid this type of incidence... – Devendra Feb 27 '13 at 10:15
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    n^24 == 1 (mod 221) when n is even, and 91-19 just happens to be a multiple of 24. I'm not entirely sure how to avoid this sort of situation - this is a better question for math.SE than here. If you ask there, please link to the new question in the comments - I'd like to see what they have to say. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 27 '13 at 11:37
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    I guess you found what 42 is the answer to! =D Never underestimate 42. – luk32 Feb 27 '13 at 12:42
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Exponentiation by 19 twice is exponentiation by 19×19 = 169 (mod 192). The question is, why is x169 = x (mod 221) for x = 42, and for so many other values of x?

Let's concentrate on the multiplicative group modulo 221. Since 221=13×17, this group has 12×16 = 192 elements, and it's isomorphic to C12×C16 (where Cn is the cyclic group of order n).

Note that x169 = x (mod 221) is equivalent to x168 = 1 (mod 221). Let's define f(x) = x168.

  • Since 168 = 0 (mod 12), f maps every element in C12 to the neutral element 1.
  • Since 168 = 8 (mod 16), f maps all even elements of C16 to the neutral element 1, which is half of the group.

Therefore f(x) = 1 (mod 221) for half of the multiplicative group modulo 221.

But x169 = x·x168, so we have x169 = x (mod 221) for half of the multiplicative group.

Inspecting the 29 integers modulo 221 that are not in the multiplicative group, we see that the congruence holds also for 21 of them. This could be investigated further. So in total, a little over half (96+21 = 117) of all messages are "decrypted" using exponent 19.

Does this mean this RSA system is broken? I don't think so; to see that the public exponent can decrypt half of the messages you need to know that the factorization of 221 is 13×17. An attacker could just as well pick a random exponent.

Update: Could this problem be avoided by a different choice of public exponent?

Since 192 = 26×3 the exponent cannot be a multiple of 2 or 3, so it has to be e = 6k±1. Its square is e² = (6k±1)² = 36k² ± 12k + 1 = 12k(3k ± 1) + 1. We see that in call cases e² = 1 (mod 12).

  • If k = 4j, e² = 48j(12j ± 1) + 1 = 1 (mod 16)
  • If k = 4j+1, e² = (48j+12)(12j + 3 ± 1) + 1 = 48j(12j+3±1)+144j+36±12+1 = 5∓4 (mod 16), so for e = 6k+1 e² = 1 (16) and for e=6k-1 e²=9 (16).
  • If k = 4j+2, e² = (48j+24)(12j + 6 ± 1) + 1 = 48j(12j+6±1)+288j+144±24+1 = 1±8 = 9 (mod 16)
  • If k = 4j+3, e² = (48j+36)(12j + 9 ± 1) + 1 = 48j(12j+9±1)+432j+324±36+1 = 5±4 (mod 16), so for e = 6k+1 e² = 9 (16) and for e=6k-1 e²=1 (16).

So, no choice of the public exponent for this modulus is better than 19: using the public exponent to decrypt will work for at least half of the messages (when e²=9 (16)), and in many cases for almost all the messages (when e²=1 (16)).

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  • > to see that the public exponent can decrypt half of the messages you need to know that the factorization of 221 is 13×17. Maybe I'm reading this wrong, but if you know half of messages get decrypted using the public exponent, can't anyone decrypt half of the messages using the public exponent? – Radical Feb 27 '13 at 16:45
  • If your choice of the key was random, using the public key to decrypt is as good as guessing a key at random. – Joni Feb 27 '13 at 18:31
  • @Joni: The choice of public key is usually fixed in RSA (most often 3), not random. The only things that are random are the two primes that make up the modulus. These are always both much larger than the public-key exponent in practice, which means this issue should never turn up in real-world RSA (er.. right?) – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 27 '13 at 21:50
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    @BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft True, in the real world the public exponent is usually one of fixed values and is not chosen in random. If the exponent is less than sqrt(lcm(p-1,q-1)) there's no way that applying the public exponent twice could decrypt any message (apart from 0 and 1, trivially) – Joni Feb 28 '13 at 10:18

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