4

I recently started learning Python and have some code here.

...
workout = input("Work out if you won?")

if workout == "y":
    ballone()
elif workout == "n":
    print("Okay.")
    sys.exit("Not working out if you won")
else:
    sys.exit("Could not understand")

##Ball one
def ballone():
...

The issue is calling 'ballone'. You can see that it is defined and works perfectly when called from the command line (ballone())

Any ideas? I have scoured the net but cannot seem to find anything to help me. If any more code needs posting then please let me know :)

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11

Move the function definition to before the lines that use it.

def ballone():
    # ...

if workout == "y":
    ballone()
elif workout == "n":
    print("Okay.")
    sys.exit("Not working out if you won")
else:
    sys.exit("Could not understand")

Functions are stored in identifiers (variables), just like your workout value. If you don't define it first, how is Python to know it'll be defined later?

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  • 1
    Typically this is done by putting the main logic in a function and calling it at the bottom of the module, usually guarded by if __name__ == '__main__':. – Steven Rumbalski Feb 27 '13 at 18:28
  • @StevenRumbalski: the __name__ test won't protect you from this error though. If you do that at the top of your module, you'll still have the same problem. – Martijn Pieters Feb 27 '13 at 18:28
  • True, but I did qualify it that way. – Steven Rumbalski Feb 27 '13 at 18:30
  • @StevenRumbalski: So you did. – Martijn Pieters Feb 27 '13 at 18:30
  • That seems really obvious now! :/ I have experience with PHP, HTML, CSS, jQuery etc... thanks for the other answers :D & for being so fast. I used to use Yahoo Answers for this type of question but this is my home now ;) :D – Mattios550 Feb 27 '13 at 18:43

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