I am having a heck of a time getting some data from a dom I want.

I have some html here:

 <ul id="userMenu">
      <li class="userGreet devi">I WANT THIS TEXT HERE </li><li> <a href="javascript:void(0)" class="more" title="Menu">Menu</a>
      <ul> ....
            <li class="home">   
            </li>
      </ul>
      ...</li>
 </ul>

I know if I say

var x = document.getElementById('userMenu');  

I can get "something" back (though this is all in a portal so its incredibly difficult to put java script break points into this). So I am not sure how I can go further to get the string "I WANT THIS TEXT HERE " ?

I think I have to walk through childNodes but not sure how or what exactly I am getting back so I can get at that string, also getElementById didn't work for the class= would that be getElementByClass ?

New to this DOM stuff.

  • can you use jquery? or are you attempting to learn the dom? – Daniel A. White Feb 27 '13 at 18:31
  • ....that's why jQuery was invented. If you want to use jQuery, it is dead simple. The element is: $('#userMenu li').eq(0) – Diodeus - James MacFarlane Feb 27 '13 at 18:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using plain javascript and making your code more robust if the order of elements changes a little bit, you could use both the id and the class to get it like this:

var text = document.getElementById('userMenu').getElementsByClassName("userGreet")[0].innerHTML;

or using tag names, it could be done like this:

var text = document.getElementById('userMenu').getElementsByTagName("li")[0].innerHTML;
  • that did it. Probably pretty simple but this helped so much everyone! – Codejoy Feb 27 '13 at 20:28

You can use this :

var text = document.querySelectorAll('#userMenu li.userGreet.devi')[0].innerHTML;

See MDN's documentation of querySelectorAll.

Note that this won't work on IE7. To do this kind of thing more easily in a cross-browser fashion, you can use one of the popular DOM manipulation libraries like jQuery.


If your HTML is different from the text you want (i.e. you have markups for example), you might use this to get the interpreted text :

var element = document.querySelectorAll('#userMenu li.userGreet.devi')[0];
var text = element.innerText || element.textContent;

Note that here again libraries help you deal with those incompatibilities between browsers. Jquery would let you do

var text = $('#userMenu li.userGreet.devi').text();
  • Use textContent (innerText for IE8) instead of innerHTML. – Rob W Feb 27 '13 at 18:34
  • The advantage of innerHTML is that it works for all browsers. As long as the text is the html, there is no worry. – Denys Séguret Feb 27 '13 at 18:34
  • 1
    textContent+innerText cover all browsers as well, and excludes HTML markup. The OP said "text", not "HTML". If the element contains HTML (elements / escaped entities), then the result is not "text". – Rob W Feb 27 '13 at 18:35
  • 1
    @RobW I edited with your suggestion. – Denys Séguret Feb 27 '13 at 18:38

Try this...

document.getElementById('userMenu').children[0].innerHTML
  • 2
    Use .children[0] instead of childNodes[0] to make sure that text nodes are excluded. – Rob W Feb 27 '13 at 18:34
  • Thanks for the tip! – Andrew Kloos Feb 27 '13 at 18:36

You can scan through like this

var x = document.getElementById('userMenu');  
var xChilds = x.childNodes;
var requiredElement = null;
for(var i = 0; i < xChilds.length; i++) {
   if(xChilds[i].className.indexOf('usergreet devi') !== -1) {
      requiredElement = xChilds[i];
      break;
   }
}

console.log(requireElement);
  • For modern browswer, use querySelectorAll as provided is dystroy's answer. – Starx Feb 27 '13 at 18:37

jQuery would make this easier. You could do something like

var text = $('#userMenu .userGreet.devi').text();
  • The convention on SO is to not offer jQuery answers when jQuery is not specified. – jfriend00 Feb 27 '13 at 19:09
  • jfriend00 - Sorry, didn't realize that - should I remove this answer? – mockaroodev Feb 27 '13 at 19:49
  • I would love to use jquery as its me trying to cram some js into a portlet, I don't think it is available. – Codejoy Feb 27 '13 at 19:53

Sorry if this is obvious, but... generally speaking, if you're going to be trying to access elements, give them IDs at the outset, it will save you lots of time.

<li id="ug0" class="userGreet devi">...</li>

Then of course

document.getElementById('ug0').innerHTML; 

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.