446

If I have two dates (ex. '8/18/2008' and '9/26/2008'), what is the best way to get the number of days between these two dates?

11 Answers 11

708

If you have two date objects, you can just subtract them, which computes a timedelta object.

from datetime import date

d0 = date(2008, 8, 18)
d1 = date(2008, 9, 26)
delta = d1 - d0
print(delta.days)

The relevant section of the docs: https://docs.python.org/library/datetime.html.

See this answer for another example.

  • 2
    Great answers here. Since a lot of the folks might be using pandas data frame, thought might be useful to check the link on how to convert from np.datetime64 to python datetime stackoverflow.com/questions/52982056/… – Pramit May 15 at 22:54
134

Using the power of datetime:

from datetime import datetime
date_format = "%m/%d/%Y"
a = datetime.strptime('8/18/2008', date_format)
b = datetime.strptime('9/26/2008', date_format)
delta = b - a
print delta.days # that's it
  • 4
    actually, the date class would be more appropriate in this case than datetime. – Jeremy Cantrell Sep 30 '08 at 15:08
  • 7
    @JeremyCantrell And yet, even eight years later, date still lacks its own equivalent to strptime(). – JAB Feb 12 '16 at 14:57
  • Why needs strptime the format arg? Should be clear with the first arg date which has a format. – Timo May 19 '18 at 11:59
32

Days until Christmas:

>>> import datetime
>>> today = datetime.date.today()
>>> someday = datetime.date(2008, 12, 25)
>>> diff = someday - today
>>> diff.days
86

More arithmetic here.

14

You want the datetime module.

>>> from datetime import datetime, timedelta 
>>> datetime(2008,08,18) - datetime(2008,09,26) 
datetime.timedelta(4) 

Another example:

>>> import datetime 
>>> today = datetime.date.today() 
>>> print(today)
2008-09-01 
>>> last_year = datetime.date(2007, 9, 1) 
>>> print(today - last_year)
366 days, 0:00:00 

As pointed out here

  • How do I get this without the 0:00:00 part? – Vicki B Sep 12 at 23:17
9
from datetime import datetime
start_date = datetime.strptime('8/18/2008', "%m/%d/%Y")
end_date = datetime.strptime('9/26/2008', "%m/%d/%Y")
print abs((end_date-start_date).days)
  • 2
    You might want to look at this. I got these errors on 2.7.3 Python running your example. File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/_strptime.py", line 325, in _strptime (data_string, format)) ValueError: time data '8/18/2008' does not match format '%Y-%m-%d' >>> Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/_strptime.py", line 325, in _strptime (data_string, format)) ValueError: time data '9/26/2008' does not match format '%Y-%m-%d' >>> – octopusgrabbus Jul 17 '12 at 20:38
  • @octopusgrabbus The format string was quite wrong. The newly edited version should work. – Christopher Dec 21 '12 at 17:37
  • 1
    This adds nothing new compared to the answers given 4 years earlier. -1. – Mark Amery Jun 26 '17 at 23:16
  • +1 for the use of abs(), which is useful when the compared dates are unknown beforehand and it is the difference you are interested in. If your second date in datetime.strptime(date, date) is later than the first date, the result will be negative. abs() makes all input absolute (ie. positive). – veuncent Jul 5 '18 at 20:06
7

It also can be easily done with arrow:

import arrow

a = arrow.get('2017-05-09')
b = arrow.get('2017-05-11')

delta = (b-a)
print delta.days

For reference: http://arrow.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

5

without using Lib just pure code:

#Calculate the Days between Two Date

daysOfMonths = [ 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31]

def isLeapYear(year):

    # Pseudo code for this algorithm is found at
    # http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_year#Algorithm
    ## if (year is not divisible by 4) then (it is a common Year)
    #else if (year is not divisable by 100) then (ut us a leap year)
    #else if (year is not disible by 400) then (it is a common year)
    #else(it is aleap year)
    return (year % 4 == 0 and year % 100 != 0) or year % 400 == 0

def Count_Days(year1, month1, day1):
    if month1 ==2:
        if isLeapYear(year1):
            if day1 < daysOfMonths[month1-1]+1:
                return year1, month1, day1+1
            else:
                if month1 ==12:
                    return year1+1,1,1
                else:
                    return year1, month1 +1 , 1
        else: 
            if day1 < daysOfMonths[month1-1]:
                return year1, month1, day1+1
            else:
                if month1 ==12:
                    return year1+1,1,1
                else:
                    return year1, month1 +1 , 1
    else:
        if day1 < daysOfMonths[month1-1]:
             return year1, month1, day1+1
        else:
            if month1 ==12:
                return year1+1,1,1
            else:
                    return year1, month1 +1 , 1


def daysBetweenDates(y1, m1, d1, y2, m2, d2,end_day):

    if y1 > y2:
        m1,m2 = m2,m1
        y1,y2 = y2,y1
        d1,d2 = d2,d1
    days=0
    while(not(m1==m2 and y1==y2 and d1==d2)):
        y1,m1,d1 = Count_Days(y1,m1,d1)
        days+=1
    if end_day:
        days+=1
    return days


# Test Case

def test():
    test_cases = [((2012,1,1,2012,2,28,False), 58), 
                  ((2012,1,1,2012,3,1,False), 60),
                  ((2011,6,30,2012,6,30,False), 366),
                  ((2011,1,1,2012,8,8,False), 585 ),
                  ((1994,5,15,2019,8,31,False), 9239),
                  ((1999,3,24,2018,2,4,False), 6892),
                  ((1999,6,24,2018,8,4,False),6981),
                  ((1995,5,24,2018,12,15,False),8606),
                  ((1994,8,24,2019,12,15,True),9245),
                  ((2019,12,15,1994,8,24,True),9245),
                  ((2019,5,15,1994,10,24,True),8970),
                  ((1994,11,24,2019,8,15,True),9031)]

    for (args, answer) in test_cases:
        result = daysBetweenDates(*args)
        if result != answer:
            print "Test with data:", args, "failed"
        else:
            print "Test case passed!"

test()
2

For calculating dates and times there are several options but I will write the simple way:

import datetime
import dateutil.relativedelta

# current time
date_and_time = datetime.datetime.now()
date_only = date.today()
time_only = datetime.datetime.now().time()

# calculate date and time
result = date_and_time - datetime.timedelta(hours=26, minutes=25, seconds=10)

# calculate dates: years (-/+)
result = date_only - dateutil.relativedelta.relativedelta(years=10)

# months
result = date_only - dateutil.relativedelta.relativedelta(months=10)

# days
result = date_only - dateutil.relativedelta.relativedelta(days=10)

# calculate time 
result = date_and_time - datetime.timedelta(hours=26, minutes=25, seconds=10)
result.time()

Hope it helps

1

from datetime import date
def d(s):
  [month, day, year] = map(int, s.split('/'))
  return date(year, month, day)
def days(start, end):
  return (d(end) - d(start)).days
print days('8/18/2008', '9/26/2008')

This assumes, of course, that you've already verified that your dates are in the format r'\d+/\d+/\d+'.

  • 1
    This adds nothing new compared to the answers given 8 years earlier. -1. – Mark Amery Jun 26 '17 at 23:17
  • 1
    The main difference is most of the other answers didn't even bother to account for the fact that the OP had his dates as strings. And those who did account for that largely used more complicated formatters than strictly necessary. So, the main difference is map(int, s.split('/')). Not exactly groundbreaking, but then again this question is pretty stupid basic. My answer just shows another way to skin the cat. – Parthian Shot Jun 28 '17 at 0:05
  • Also mentioned validating that dates are in the correct format, and gave a first-approximation validation regex. Which others didn't. – Parthian Shot Jun 28 '17 at 0:07
0

Here are three ways to go with this problem :

from datetime import datetime

Now = datetime.now()
StartDate = datetime.strptime(str(Now.year) +'-01-01', '%Y-%m-%d')
NumberOfDays = (Now - StartDate)

print(NumberOfDays.days)                     # Starts at 0
print(datetime.now().timetuple().tm_yday)    # Starts at 1
print(Now.strftime('%j'))                    # Starts at 1
0

There is also a datetime.toordinal() method that was not mentioned yet:

import datetime
print(datetime.date(2008,9,26).toordinal() - datetime.date(2008,8,18).toordinal())  # 39

https://docs.python.org/3/library/datetime.html#datetime.date.toordinal

date.toordinal()

Return the proleptic Gregorian ordinal of the date, where January 1 of year 1 has ordinal 1. For any date object d, date.fromordinal(d.toordinal()) == d.

Seems well suited for calculating days difference, though not as readable as timedelta.days.

  • 1
    There are cases in which this approach wins. For example, the actual difference between 2019-07-09 23:50 and 2019-07-10 00:10 is twenty minutes. (d1 - d0).days returns 0, d1.toordinal() - d0.toordinal() returns 1. Depends on what you need in your actual usecase. – peter.slizik Jul 10 at 8:52

protected by Community Feb 21 '18 at 9:45

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