52

Assume there are some folders with these structures

/bench1/1cpu/p_0/image/
/bench1/1cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/1cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/1cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/1cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/1cpu/p_1/image/
/bench1/1cpu/p_1/fl_1/
/bench1/1cpu/p_1/fl_1/
/bench1/1cpu/p_1/fl_1/
/bench1/1cpu/p_1/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_0/image/
/bench1/2cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_0/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_1/image/
/bench1/2cpu/p_1/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_1/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_1/fl_1/
/bench1/2cpu/p_1/fl_1/
....

What I want to do is to scp the following folders

/bench1/1cpu/p_0/image/
/bench1/1cpu/p_1/image/
/bench1/2cpu/p_0/image/
/bench1/2cpu/p_1/image/

As you can see I want to recursively use scp but excluding all folders that name "fl_X". It seems that scp has not such option.

UPDATE scp has not such feature. Instead I use the following command

 rsync -av --exclude 'fl_*' user@server:/my/dir

But it doesn't work. It only transfers the list of folders!! something like ls -R

  • 2
    Look into rsync, which can use scp (or at least ssh) as its transfer mechanism and supports exluding certain subdirectories from its argument. – chepner Feb 27 '13 at 20:08
  • 2
    Is this OK? rsync -av --exclude 'fl_*' user@server:/my/dir . – mahmood Feb 27 '13 at 20:10
  • I think that's the right idea. I mentioned this in a comment because I'm not confident enough in my rsync skills to provide a definitive answer. – chepner Feb 27 '13 at 20:12
  • It doesn't work. Someone please see the updated post – mahmood Feb 27 '13 at 20:18
  • can't you do scp /bench1/1cpu/p_*/image/* remotehhost:/path/2/remote ? Good luck. – shellter Feb 27 '13 at 20:22
44

Although scp supports recursive directory copying with the -r option, it does not support filtering of the files. There are several ways to accomplish your task, but I would probably rely on find, xargs, tar, and ssh instead of scp.

find . -type d -wholename '*bench*/image' \
| xargs tar cf - \
| ssh user@remote tar xf - -C /my/dir

The rsync solution can be made to work, but you are missing some arguments. rsync also needs the r switch to recurse into subdirectories. Also, if you want the same security of scp, you need to do the transfer under ssh. Something like:

rsync -avr -e "ssh -l user" --exclude 'fl_*' ./bench* remote:/my/dir
  • 2
    So where is "filtering"? you are using tar for archiving? – mahmood Feb 28 '13 at 20:35
  • find is doing the filtering for you in my solution. tar packages up the directories you want to copy on the local side, and unpackages them on the remote side. – jxh Feb 28 '13 at 20:36
  • @jxh How could you do it from remote to local? Can you excecute those find, xargs and tar commands in the remote machine and grab that data to the local one via ssh? – jgomo3 Dec 29 '16 at 21:04
  • 1
    @jgomo3: Yes, you can use ssh and execute tar to package up files on the remote and use tar locally to unpackage them. – jxh Dec 29 '16 at 21:25
  • 1
    @alonsos: The find command identifies directories that match the provided pattern and prints them out. The xargs command reads the input and makes them arguments to the tar command, which then archives all the directories. The ssh command connects to the remote machine and executes tar on the remote machine, which unpacks the archive into the /my/dir directory. – jxh Nov 23 '17 at 5:39
11

Assuming the simplest option (installing rsync on the remote host) isn't feasible, you can use sshfs to mount the remote locally, and rsync from the mount directory. That way you can use all the options rsync offers, for example --exclude.

Something like this should do:

sshfs user@server: sshfsdir
rsync --recursive --exclude=whatever sshfsdir/path/on/server /where/to/store

Note that the effectiveness of rsync (only transferring changes, not everything) doesn't apply here. This is because for that to work, rsync must read every file's contents to see what has changed. However, as rsync runs only on one host, the whole file must be transferred there (by sshfs). Excluded files should not be transferred, however.

  • worked, but the --exlude param had to be placed just after rsync command; else I faced ERROR: destination must be a directory when copying more than 1 file – kellogs Mar 2 '16 at 17:31
  • And it should be exclude=param instead of exclude param – kellogs Mar 2 '16 at 18:13
  • 1
    Bizarre, my version of rsync doesn't care about the order. I changed it nonetheless to avoid people running into problems. Thanks. – Marian Mar 4 '16 at 19:33
7

You can export a GLOBIGNORE and use "*"

export GLOBIGNORE='ignore1:ignore2'
scp -r source/* remoteurl:remoteDir
  • 4
    or without export: GLOBIGNORE='ignore1:ignore2' scp -r source/* remoteurl:remoteDir – Martin Ždila Nov 30 '18 at 16:02
2

If you use a pem file to authenticate u can use the following command (which will exclude files with something extension):

rsync -Lavz -e "ssh -i <full-path-to-pem> -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null" --exclude "*.something" --progress <path inside local host> <user>@<host>:<path inside remote host>

The -L means follow links (copy files not links). Use full path to your pem file and not relative.

Using sshfs is not recommended since it works slowly. Also, the combination of find and scp that was presented above is also a bad idea since it will open a ssh session per file which is too expensive.

  • A find and scp probably would need an ssh session per file. But it's not what my answer is doing. – jxh Dec 13 '18 at 17:16
0

You can use extended globbing as in the example below:

#Enable extglob
shopt -s extglob

cp -rv !(./excludeme/*.jpg) /var/destination
0

This one works fine for me as the directories structure is not important for me.

scp -r USER@HOSTNAME:~/bench1/?cpu/p_?/image/ .

Assuming /bench1 is in the home directory of the current user. Also, change USER and HOSTNAME to the real values.

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