706

Assuming I have the following:

var array = 
    [
        {"name":"Joe", "age":17}, 
        {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, 
        {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}
    ]

What is the best way to be able to get an array of all of the distinct ages such that I get an result array of:

[17, 35]

Is there some way I could alternatively structure the data or better method such that I would not have to iterate through each array checking the value of "age" and check against another array for its existence, and add it if not?

If there was some way I could just pull out the distinct ages without iterating...

Current inefficent way I would like to improve... If it means that instead of "array" being an array of objects, but a "map" of objects with some unique key (i.e. "1,2,3") that would be okay too. Im just looking for the most performance efficient way.

The following is how I currently do it, but for me, iteration appears to just be crummy for efficiency even though it does work...

var distinct = []
for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
   if (array[i].age not in distinct)
      distinct.push(array[i].age)
6
  • 59
    iteration isn't "crummy for efficiency" and you can't do anything to every element "without iterating". you can use various functional-looking methods, but ultimately, something on some level has to iterate over the items.
    – Eevee
    Feb 28, 2013 at 1:47
  • //100% running code const listOfTags = [{ id: 1, label: "Hello", color: "red", sorting: 0 }, { id: 2, label: "World", color: "green", sorting: 1 }, { id: 3, label: "Hello", color: "blue", sorting: 4 }, { id: 4, label: "Sunshine", color: "yellow", sorting: 5 }, { id: 5, label: "Hello", color: "red", sorting: 6 }], keys = ['label', 'color'], filtered = listOfTags.filter( (s => o => (k => !s.has(k) && s.add(k)) (keys.map(k => o[k]).join('|')) ) (new Set) ); console.log(filtered); Nov 7, 2019 at 12:15
  • 1
    the bounty is great, but the question with the given data and answer is already answered here: stackoverflow.com/questions/53542882/…. what is the purpose of the bounty? should i answer this particular problem with two or more keys? Nov 8, 2019 at 8:59
  • 1
    Set object and maps are wasteful. This job just takes a simple .reduce() stage.
    – Redu
    Nov 13, 2019 at 19:37
  • Please check this example, stackoverflow.com/a/58944998/13013258 .
    – Kezia Rose
    May 19, 2021 at 8:08

59 Answers 59

1109

If you are using ES6/ES2015 or later you can do it this way:

const data = [
  { group: 'A', name: 'SD' }, 
  { group: 'B', name: 'FI' }, 
  { group: 'A', name: 'MM' },
  { group: 'B', name: 'CO'}
];
const unique = [...new Set(data.map(item => item.group))]; // [ 'A', 'B']

Here is an example on how to do it.

12
  • 12
    I get an error : TypeError: (intermediate value).slice is not a function Jul 13, 2016 at 10:28
  • 11
    @Thomas ... means spread operator. In this case it means create new set and spread it in a list. You can find more about it here: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Jun 16, 2017 at 14:09
  • 15
    for typescript you have to use new Set wrapped in Array.from()... i will provide that answer below. @AngJobs Aug 25, 2017 at 16:24
  • 6
    is it possible to find out unique objects based on multiple keys in the object? Nov 3, 2017 at 12:24
  • 39
    This solution was give almost verbatim a few months earlier by @Russell Vea. Did you check for existing answers? But then again, 266+ votes show that nobody else checked either. Sep 28, 2018 at 3:18
297

For those who want to return object with all properties unique by key

const array =
  [
    { "name": "Joe", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Bob", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Carl", "age": 35 }
  ]

const key = 'age';

const arrayUniqueByKey = [...new Map(array.map(item =>
  [item[key], item])).values()];

console.log(arrayUniqueByKey);

   /*OUTPUT
       [
        { "name": "Bob", "age": 17 },
        { "name": "Carl", "age": 35 }
       ]
   */

 // Note: this will pick the last duplicated item in the list.

5
  • 3
    Your solution is perfect / modern Dec 24, 2021 at 7:04
  • 2
    Fantastic - I was about to search for this question, or write one myself, then saw your answer here.
    – jbyrd
    Feb 10 at 22:06
  • can this approach be used to store several items that has same value as unique key. say I want the output to be like: key 17 have values of array of object items that store Bob and Joe object. after I research, It need few iteration to get what I wanted. Maybe there is one liner chaining function that I didn't know of Mar 17 at 9:36
  • You should explain this approach little @arun
    – jaideep
    Jun 28 at 19:45
  • One improvement -- add .filter(Boolean) before the map call. If any of your objects in the array are null then this will throw Cannot read properties of null (reading 'id')
    – Paul G
    Jun 29 at 18:52
280

using ES6

let array = [
  { "name": "Joe", "age": 17 },
  { "name": "Bob", "age": 17 },
  { "name": "Carl", "age": 35 }
];
array.map(item => item.age)
  .filter((value, index, self) => self.indexOf(value) === index)

> [17, 35]
10
  • 5
    If I want to get the value with it's index then how can I get Example: I want to get {"name": "Bob", "age":"17"},{"name": "Bob", "age":"17"} Sep 12, 2018 at 3:51
  • 59
    That's why you have to keep scrolling Sep 12, 2018 at 19:42
  • 16
    @AbdullahAlMamun you can use map in .filter instead of call .map first, like this: array.filter((value, index, self) => self.map(x => x.age).indexOf(value.age) == index)
    – Leo
    Sep 14, 2018 at 13:42
  • 2
    ps: .map inside .filter can be slow, so be careful with large arrays
    – Leo
    Sep 14, 2018 at 13:53
  • 4
    @IvanNosov your snippet is very good although several lines of explanation how it works with pointers to map and filter documentation will make it perfect and clear for beginners
    – azakgaim
    Nov 20, 2018 at 16:11
158

Using ES6 features, you could do something like:

const uniqueAges = [...new Set( array.map(obj => obj.age)) ];
3
  • 11
    This approach will only work on primitive types (which is the case here as ages are an array of numbers) yet will fail for objects.
    – k0pernikus
    Jun 24, 2019 at 13:22
  • any idea how to make it work for objects with two keys?
    – cegprakash
    Sep 5, 2019 at 12:40
  • 14
    Something like const uniqueObjects = [ ...new Set( array.map( obj => obj.age) ) ].map( age=> { return array.find(obj => obj.age === age) } )
    – Harley B
    Dec 6, 2019 at 12:16
155

If this were PHP I'd build an array with the keys and take array_keys at the end, but JS has no such luxury. Instead, try this:

var flags = [], output = [], l = array.length, i;
for( i=0; i<l; i++) {
    if( flags[array[i].age]) continue;
    flags[array[i].age] = true;
    output.push(array[i].age);
}
5
  • 17
    No, because array_unique would compare the entire item, not just the age as is asked here. Feb 28, 2013 at 2:18
  • 8
    I think flags = {} is more better than flags = []
    – zhuguowei
    Jun 12, 2017 at 9:35
  • 3
    @zhuguowei perhaps, although there's nothing really wrong with sparse arrays - and I also assumed that age is a relatively small integer (<120 surely) Jun 12, 2017 at 14:56
  • how we could also print out the total number of people that have same age? Mar 20, 2019 at 1:43
  • @NiettheDarkAbsol how would you go about something like this? jsfiddle.net/BeerusDev/asgq8n7e/28 I have an array with objects, and each key Days has an array.
    – BeerusDev
    Jul 8, 2021 at 14:52
151

You could use a dictionary approach like this one. Basically you assign the value you want to be distinct as a key in the "dictionary" (here we use an array as an object to avoid dictionary-mode). If the key did not exist then you add that value as distinct.

Here is a working demo:

var array = [{"name":"Joe", "age":17}, {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}];
var unique = [];
var distinct = [];
for( let i = 0; i < array.length; i++ ){
  if( !unique[array[i].age]){
    distinct.push(array[i].age);
    unique[array[i].age] = 1;
  }
}
var d = document.getElementById("d");
d.innerHTML = "" + distinct;
<div id="d"></div>

This will be O(n) where n is the number of objects in array and m is the number of unique values. There is no faster way than O(n) because you must inspect each value at least once.

The previous version of this used an object, and for in. These were minor in nature, and have since been minorly updated above. However, the reason for a seeming advance in performance between the two versions in the original jsperf was due to the data sample size being so small. Thus, the main comparison in the previous version was looking at the difference between the internal map and filter use versus the dictionary mode lookups.

I have updated the code above, as noted, however, I have also updated the jsperf to look through 1000 objects instead of 3. 3 overlooked many of the performance pitfalls involved (obsolete jsperf).

Performance

https://jsperf.com/filter-vs-dictionary-more-data When I ran this dictionary was 96% faster.

filter vs dictionary

18
  • 5
    fast, and without any additional plugins required. Really cool
    – mihai
    Dec 14, 2015 at 21:41
  • 2
    how about if( typeof(unique[array[i].age]) == "undefined"){ distinct.push(array[i].age); unique[array[i].age] = 0; }
    – Timeless
    Oct 7, 2016 at 4:47
  • 7
    Wow the performance has really changed in favour of the map option. Click that jsperf link!
    – A T
    Apr 2, 2017 at 15:53
  • 2
    @98percentmonkey - The object was used to facilitate the "dictionary approach". Inside the object, each occurrence being tracked is added as a key (or a bin). This way, when we come across an occurrence, we can check to see if the key (or bin) exists; if it does exist, we know that the occurrence is not unique - if it does not exist, we know that the occurrence is unique and add it in.
    – Travis J
    Jul 31, 2018 at 20:02
  • 2
    @98percentmonkey - The reason for using an object is that the lookup is O(1) since it checks for a property name once, whereas an array is O(n) since it has to look at every value to check for existence. At the end of the process, the set of keys (bins) in the object represents the set of unique occurrences.
    – Travis J
    Jul 31, 2018 at 20:02
141

This is how you would solve this using new Set via ES6 for Typescript as of August 25th, 2017

Array.from(new Set(yourArray.map((item: any) => item.id)))
3
  • 3
    this helped, was getting before thanks. Type 'Set' is not an array type Apr 5, 2018 at 23:38
  • 1
    This is a great answer. Untill i scrolled down to this one, i was going to write an answer saying: Object.keys(values.reduce<any>((x, y) => {x[y] = null; return x; }, {})); But this answer is more concise and applies to all data types instead of just strings.
    – jgosar
    Nov 11, 2019 at 8:28
  • Non typescript version: Array.from(new Set(yourArray.map((item) => item.id)))
    – Doomd
    Jan 22, 2021 at 23:53
71

I'd just map and remove dups:

var ages = array.map(function(obj) { return obj.age; });
ages = ages.filter(function(v,i) { return ages.indexOf(v) == i; });

console.log(ages); //=> [17, 35]

Edit: Aight! Not the most efficient way in terms of performance, but the simplest most readable IMO. If you really care about micro-optimization or you have huge amounts of data then a regular for loop is going to be more "efficient".

5
  • 4
    @elclanrs - "the most performance efficient way" - This approach is slow.
    – Travis J
    Feb 28, 2013 at 1:47
  • 2
    @Eevee: I see. The underscore version in your answer is not very fast either, I mean, in the end you choose what's more convenient, I doubt 1-30% more or less reflects "huge improvement" in generic tests and when OP/s are in the thousands.
    – elclanrs
    Feb 28, 2013 at 1:58
  • 4
    well, sure. with only three elements, the fastest thing is to make three variables and use some ifs. you'll get some very different results with three million.
    – Eevee
    Feb 28, 2013 at 2:06
  • 2
    not fast but in my case it did the trick as I'm not dealing with a large dataset, thanks. Feb 4, 2018 at 15:26
  • Isn't this O(N^2)? Not recommended. You want to use something constant time for inner-lookups, like a map.
    – drone1
    Jun 29 at 12:37
51
var unique = array
    .map(p => p.age)
    .filter((age, index, arr) => arr.indexOf(age) == index)
    .sort(); // sorting is optional

// or in ES6

var unique = [...new Set(array.map(p => p.age))];

// or with lodash

var unique = _.uniq(_.map(array, 'age'));

ES6 example

const data = [
  { name: "Joe", age: 17}, 
  { name: "Bob", age: 17}, 
  { name: "Carl", age: 35}
];

const arr = data.map(p => p.age); // [17, 17, 35]
const s = new Set(arr); // {17, 35} a set removes duplications, but it's still a set
const unique = [...s]; // [17, 35] Use the spread operator to transform a set into an Array
// or use Array.from to transform a set into an array
const unique2 = Array.from(s); // [17, 35]
3
  • 6
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value.
    – Alexander
    Dec 16, 2018 at 16:52
  • The first one which is using the indexOf vs the index is just brilliant.
    – alas
    Nov 20, 2019 at 17:38
  • Note that this only works for primitive values. If you have an array of dates, then you need some more customized methods. Read more here: codeburst.io/javascript-array-distinct-5edc93501dc4
    – Molx
    May 1, 2020 at 6:28
33

There are many valid answers already, but I wanted to add one that uses only the reduce() method because it is clean and simple.

function uniqueBy(arr, prop){
  return arr.reduce((a, d) => {
    if (!a.includes(d[prop])) { a.push(d[prop]); }
    return a;
  }, []);
}

Use it like this:

var array = [
  {"name": "Joe", "age": 17}, 
  {"name": "Bob", "age": 17}, 
  {"name": "Carl", "age": 35}
];

var ages = uniqueBy(array, "age");
console.log(ages); // [17, 35]
1
  • is this slower than the top answer ?
    – Gel
    Jun 12 at 3:44
32

const array = [
  {"id":"93","name":"CVAM_NGP_KW"},
  {"id":"94","name":"CVAM_NGP_PB"},
  {"id":"93","name":"CVAM_NGP_KW"},
  {"id":"94","name":"CVAM_NGP_PB"}
]

function uniq(array, field) {
  return array.reduce((accumulator, current) => {
      if(!accumulator.includes(current[field])) {
        accumulator.push(current[field])
      }
      return accumulator;
    }, []
  )
}

const ids = uniq(array, 'id');
console.log(ids)

/* output 
["93", "94"]
*/

1
  • 4
    this looks like O(n^2)
    – cegprakash
    Sep 5, 2019 at 12:56
25

This is a slight variation on the ES6 version if you need the entire object:

let arr = [
    {"name":"Joe", "age":17}, 
    {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, 
    {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}
]
arr.filter((a, i) => arr.findIndex((s) => a.age === s.age) === i) // [{"name":"Joe", "age":17}, {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}]
2
  • I executed this and it's not filtering as described and the result is // [{"name":"Joe", "age":17}]
    – G. I. Joe
    Jan 3 at 20:20
  • Correctly updated the filter param to be age. Thanks for spotting
    – Ciprian
    Jan 5 at 9:11
24

I have a small solution

let data = [{id: 1}, {id: 2}, {id: 3}, {id: 2}, {id: 3}];

let result = data.filter((value, index, self) => self.findIndex((m) => m.id === value.id) === index);
22

The forEach version of @travis-j's answer (helpful on modern browsers and Node JS world):

var unique = {};
var distinct = [];
array.forEach(function (x) {
  if (!unique[x.age]) {
    distinct.push(x.age);
    unique[x.age] = true;
  }
});

34% faster on Chrome v29.0.1547: http://jsperf.com/filter-versus-dictionary/3

And a generic solution that takes a mapper function (tad slower than direct map, but that's expected):

function uniqueBy(arr, fn) {
  var unique = {};
  var distinct = [];
  arr.forEach(function (x) {
    var key = fn(x);
    if (!unique[key]) {
      distinct.push(key);
      unique[key] = true;
    }
  });
  return distinct;
}

// usage
uniqueBy(array, function(x){return x.age;}); // outputs [17, 35]
2
  • 1
    I like the generic solution best since it's unlikely that age is the only distinct value needed in a real world scenario.
    – Toft
    Nov 1, 2013 at 11:17
  • 6
    In the generic, change "distinct.push(key)" to "distinct.push(x)" to return a list of the actual elements, which I find highly usable! Aug 28, 2014 at 12:56
17

I've started sticking Underscore in all new projects by default just so I never have to think about these little data-munging problems.

var array = [{"name":"Joe", "age":17}, {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}];
console.log(_.chain(array).map(function(item) { return item.age }).uniq().value());

Produces [17, 35].

14

Here's another way to solve this:

var result = {};
for(var i in array) {
    result[array[i].age] = null;
}

result = Object.keys(result);

or

result = Object.values(result);

I have no idea how fast this solution is compared to the others, but I like the cleaner look. ;-)


EDIT: Okay, the above seems to be the slowest solution of all here.

I've created a performance test case here: http://jsperf.com/distinct-values-from-array

Instead of testing for the ages (Integers), I chose to compare the names (Strings).

Method 1 (TS's solution) is very fast. Interestingly enough, Method 7 outperforms all other solutions, here I just got rid of .indexOf() and used a "manual" implementation of it, avoiding looped function calling:

var result = [];
loop1: for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    var name = array[i].name;
    for (var i2 = 0; i2 < result.length; i2++) {
        if (result[i2] == name) {
            continue loop1;
        }
    }
    result.push(name);
}

The difference in performance using Safari & Firefox is amazing, and it seems like Chrome does the best job on optimization.

I'm not exactly sure why the above snippets is so fast compared to the others, maybe someone wiser than me has an answer. ;-)

11

using lodash

var array = [
    { "name": "Joe", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Bob", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Carl", "age": 35 }
];
_.chain(array).pluck('age').unique().value();
> [17, 35]
5
  • 3
    Can you explain how to do this with plain javascript as is implied in the question?
    – Ruskin
    Jan 21, 2015 at 14:06
  • it is an underscore function _.chain
    – vini
    May 28, 2015 at 19:00
  • 2
    but pluck() is not in lodash. Nov 29, 2016 at 10:57
  • 1
    _.chain(array).map('age').unique().value(); worked for me. Nov 29, 2016 at 11:07
  • version 4.0 had some breaking changes refer - stackoverflow.com/a/31740263/4050261 Mar 2, 2018 at 22:19
11

var array = [
          {"name":"Joe", "age":17}, 
          {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, 
          {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}
      ];

      const ages = [...new Set(array.reduce((a, c) => [...a, c.age], []))];
    
      console.log(ages);

3
10

const array =
  [
    { "name": "Joe", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Bob", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Carl", "age": 35 }
  ]

const key = 'age';

const arrayUniqueByKey = [...new Map(array.map(item =>
  [item[key], item])).values()];

console.log(arrayUniqueByKey);

2
9

Simple distinct filter using Maps :

let array = 
    [
        {"name":"Joe", "age":17}, 
        {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, 
        {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}
    ];

let data = new Map();

for (let obj of array) {
  data.set(obj.age, obj);
}

let out = [...data.values()];

console.log(out);

7

Using Lodash

var array = [
    { "name": "Joe", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Bob", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Carl", "age": 35 }
];

_.chain(array).map('age').unique().value();

Returns [17,35]

6
function get_unique_values_from_array_object(array,property){
    var unique = {};
    var distinct = [];
    for( var i in array ){
       if( typeof(unique[array[i][property]]) == "undefined"){
          distinct.push(array[i]);
       }
       unique[array[i][property]] = 0;
    }
    return distinct;
}
0
5

underscore.js _.uniq(_.pluck(array,"age"))

2
  • 5
    Please add an explanation of how this answers the question. May 2, 2016 at 17:43
  • 2
    _.pluck has been removed in favor of _.map
    – Ajax3.14
    Sep 25, 2016 at 9:42
5

Here's a versatile solution that uses reduce, allows for mapping, and maintains insertion order.

items: An array

mapper: A unary function that maps the item to the criteria, or empty to map the item itself.

function distinct(items, mapper) {
    if (!mapper) mapper = (item)=>item;
    return items.map(mapper).reduce((acc, item) => {
        if (acc.indexOf(item) === -1) acc.push(item);
        return acc;
    }, []);
}

Usage

const distinctLastNames = distinct(items, (item)=>item.lastName);
const distinctItems = distinct(items);

You can add this to your Array prototype and leave out the items parameter if that's your style...

const distinctLastNames = items.distinct( (item)=>item.lastName) ) ;
const distinctItems = items.distinct() ;

You can also use a Set instead of an Array to speed up the matching.

function distinct(items, mapper) {
    if (!mapper) mapper = (item)=>item;
    return items.map(mapper).reduce((acc, item) => {
        acc.add(item);
        return acc;
    }, new Set());
}
5

If you want to have an unique list of objects returned back. here is another alternative:

const unique = (arr, encoder=JSON.stringify, decoder=JSON.parse) =>
  [...new Set(arr.map(item => encoder(item)))].map(item => decoder(item));

Which will turn this:

unique([{"name": "john"}, {"name": "sarah"}, {"name": "john"}])

into

[{"name": "john"}, {"name": "sarah"}]

The trick here is that we are first encoding the items into strings using JSON.stringify, and then we are converting that to a Set (which makes the list of strings unique) and then we are converting it back to the original objects using JSON.parse.

5

    var array = 
    [
        {"name":"Joe", "age":17}, 
        {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, 
        {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}
    ]

    console.log(Object.keys(array.reduce((r,{age}) => (r[age]='', r) , {})))

Output:

Array ["17", "35"]
4

Just found this and I thought it's useful

_.map(_.indexBy(records, '_id'), function(obj){return obj})

Again using underscore, so if you have an object like this

var records = [{_id:1,name:'one', _id:2,name:'two', _id:1,name:'one'}]

it will give you the unique objects only.

What happens here is that indexBy returns a map like this

{ 1:{_id:1,name:'one'}, 2:{_id:2,name:'two'} }

and just because it's a map, all keys are unique.

Then I'm just mapping this list back to array.

In case you need only the distinct values

_.map(_.indexBy(records, '_id'), function(obj,key){return key})

Keep in mind that the key is returned as a string so, if you need integers instead, you should do

_.map(_.indexBy(records, '_id'), function(obj,key){return parseInt(key)})
0
4

i think you are looking for groupBy function (using Lodash)

_personsList = [{"name":"Joe", "age":17}, 
                {"name":"Bob", "age":17}, 
                {"name":"Carl", "age": 35}];
_uniqAgeList = _.groupBy(_personsList,"age");
_uniqAges = Object.keys(_uniqAgeList);

produces result:

17,35

jsFiddle demo:http://jsfiddle.net/4J2SX/201/

0
4
[...new Set([
    { "name": "Joe", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Bob", "age": 17 },
    { "name": "Carl", "age": 35 }
  ].map(({ age }) => age))]
3

If you have Array.prototype.includes or are willing to polyfill it, this works:

var ages = []; array.forEach(function(x) { if (!ages.includes(x.age)) ages.push(x.age); });

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