I'm trying to figure out if it is possible to change the CSS property for cursor on a default HTML5 video element. So far, my testing has concluded:

  1. No user-agents (browsers) implement cursor: pointer by default. So you are left with the normal OS arrow/control indicator

  2. When you attempt to set cursor: pointer, the user-agents will change the cursor ONLY when the cursor is not over clickable elements within the video element... ie: play, pause, seek, mute, fullscreen.

  3. This seems to be reverse the implementation of what SHOULD happen. The clickable elements of the video tag (control bar, center play button) should get the cursor style...or hell, just apply it to the whole thing.

Does anyone have any insight on this?

  • 2) Works in the firefox 19.0 over the controls. The entire video is one big clickable element as well. Clicking somewhere other than the controls toggles play/pause. – Jrod Feb 28 '13 at 18:26
  • Does HTML5 state that the cursor over a video should be or must be a pointer and not up to the UA to choose? In CSS, the default is cursor: auto. – BoltClock Feb 28 '13 at 18:29
  • @Jrod Cool - not sure I tested it in 19 yet. – tvpmb Feb 28 '13 at 20:20
  • @BoltClock I'm not suggesting that it should be forced at all, but cursor: auto should be pointer when an item is clickable, no? – tvpmb Feb 28 '13 at 20:20
  • @tvpmb, no, it should not. It's only necessary for elements that don't otherwise present an affordance of clickability. – zzzzBov Feb 28 '13 at 21:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

For webkit you can target their pseudo elements

video::-webkit-media-controls-panel

video::-webkit-media-controls-play-button

video::-webkit-media-controls-volume-slider-container

video::-webkit-media-controls-volume-slider

video::-webkit-media-controls-mute-button

video::-webkit-media-controls-timeline

video::-webkit-media-controls-current-time-display

video::-webkit-full-page-media::-webkit-media-controls-panel

video::-webkit-media-controls-timeline-container

video::-webkit-media-controls-time-remaining-display

video::-webkit-media-controls-seek-back-button

video::-webkit-media-controls-seek-forward-button

video::-webkit-media-controls-fullscreen-button

video::-webkit-media-controls-rewind-button

video::-webkit-media-controls-return-to-realtime-button

video::-webkit-media-controls-toggle-closed-captions-button

Update

Extended list of webkit pseudo elements: https://gist.github.com/afabbro/3759334

  • 2
    WebKit, you so crazy. – BoltClock Feb 28 '13 at 18:33
  • 1
    Crazy but also kind of genius. Using the pseudo elements you could create a video player with matching styles to the rest of your site. – Jrod Feb 28 '13 at 18:46
  • @Jrod Awesome man. I didn't think to look through the cough extensive list of pseudo elements. This should make the boss happy. Yes, for some reason it matters...LOL – tvpmb Feb 28 '13 at 20:21
  • @tvpmb I didn't know they existed until you asked the question so we both learned something today! – Jrod Feb 28 '13 at 20:28
  • FWIW - Look what I found, this is only webkit, but good for reference either way: gist.github.com/afabbro/3759334 – tvpmb Feb 28 '13 at 20:30

Why do no user-agents implement the CSS cursor style for video elements?

Because there's no need for it

This seems to be reverse the implementation of what SHOULD happen.

What do you think "should" happen? Pointers are not necessary for interactive elements. For example, if you hover over the scroll bar your arrow stays an arrow. In fact, most buttons for most computer software do not change the cursor. It's not necessary, as the hover & focus states of interactive elements are enough to afford clickability.

The reason cursor: pointer is common on the web, and the reason it's necessary is due to hyperlinks. Hyperlinks don't react on hover by default. A pointer is used to cue the user that the link can be clicked on.

For <video> elements, there are sufficient hover states that there's no need for the cursor to change.

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