30

I have a class Product and a complex type AddressDetails

public class Product
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }

    public AddressDetails AddressDetails { get; set; }
}

public class AddressDetails
{
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
    // other properties
}

Is it possible to prevent mapping "Country" property from AddressDetails inside Product class? (because i will never need it for Product class)

Something like this

Property(p => p.AddressDetails.Country).Ignore();
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  • 2
    Have you overridden DbContext.OnModelCreating yet? Does modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Ignore(p => p.AddressDetails.Country) in that method fail? – Twon-ha Feb 28 '13 at 8:59
  • Yes, exactly, but Ignore() method doesn't exist. – Catalin Feb 28 '13 at 10:16
  • 1
    Have you considered using a different class for Product.AddressDetail. It obviously has a different behavior from the AddressDetail used elsewhere. – Aron Jul 30 '14 at 6:49
  • 1
    @RaraituL You mean you were trying to avoid SOLID design? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liskov_substitution_principle – Aron Jul 30 '14 at 7:48
  • 1
    @RaraituL the ignore code, if it worked, would break LSP. If you took a function that assumes that Country != null and run it against Product.AddressDetail it would throw. Therefore LSP was violated. PS. Less classes does not equal simple. In your case you have created a new edge case, which is not KISS. – Aron Jul 30 '14 at 8:31
27

For EF5 and older: In the DbContext.OnModelCreating override for your context:

modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Ignore(p => p.AddressDetails.Country);

For EF6: You're out of luck. See Mrchief's answer.

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  • 3
    Doesn't work: The expression 'p => p.AddressDetails.Country' is not a valid property expression. The expression should represent a property: C#: 't => t.MyProperty' VB.Net: 'Function(t) t.MyProperty'. – Mrchief Jul 30 '14 at 2:06
  • 1
    @Mrchief Right, this was for older versions. I've added a link to your answer, since that is the correct one for current EF versions. – Twon-ha Apr 14 '15 at 11:24
  • 1
    Sad that they would actively prevent this in EF6. Hope it was for some hidden good reason. – Søren Boisen Apr 29 '15 at 18:43
  • This is really annoying. It seems they've removed functionality. – Jeremy Holovacs Nov 10 '15 at 18:01
15

Unfortunately the accepted answer doesn't work, not at least with EF6 and especially if the child class is not an entity.

I haven't found any way to do this via fluent API. The only way it works is via data annotations:

public class AddressDetails
{
    public string City { get; set; }

    [NotMapped]
    public string Country { get; set; }
    // other properties
}

Note: If you have a situation where Country should be excluded only when it is part of certain other entity, then you're out of luck with this approach.

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  • What do you mean with if the child class is not an entity? If the child class is a ComplexType? – Catalin Jul 30 '14 at 7:39
  • Yeah. If it is an entity, you can add its own configuration and skip the mapping. – Mrchief Jul 30 '14 at 15:56
  • @Mrchief you can try modelBuilder.ComplexType<AddressDetails>().Ignore(ad => ad.Country); to achieve the same result using Fluent API. – Verbon Oct 23 '17 at 13:47
9

If you are using an implementation of EntityTypeConfiguration you can use the Ignore Method:

public class SubscriptionMap: EntityTypeConfiguration<Subscription>
{
    // Primary Key
    HasKey(p => p.Id)

    Property(p => p.Id).HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity);
    Property(p => p.SubscriptionNumber).IsOptional().HasMaxLength(20);
    ...
    ...

    Ignore(p => p.SubscriberSignature);

    ToTable("Subscriptions");
}
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  • What do you mean it does not work with complex types ? Mapping complex types is done automatically when you add the virtual keyword in your property declaration. If you don't want to map it, simply remove the virtual keyword. – Maxime Aug 3 '15 at 20:37
  • Oh.. you mean when in a nested object... I understand. – Maxime Aug 3 '15 at 20:39
3

While I realize that this is an old question, the answers didn't resolve my issue with EF 6.

For EF 6 you need to create a ComplexTypeConfiguration Mapping.

example:

public class Workload
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int ContractId { get; set; }
    public WorkloadStatus Status {get; set; }
    public Configruation Configuration { get; set; }
}
public class Configuration
{
    public int Timeout { get; set; }
    public bool SaveResults { get; set; }
    public int UnmappedProperty { get; set; }
}

public class WorkloadMap : System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.EntityTypeConfiguration<Workload>
{
    public WorkloadMap()
    {
         ToTable("Workload");
         HasKey(x => x.Id);
    }
}
// Here This is where we mange the Configuration
public class ConfigurationMap : ComplexTypeConfiguration<Configuration>
{
    ConfigurationMap()
    {
       Property(x => x.TimeOut).HasColumnName("TimeOut");
       Ignore(x => x.UnmappedProperty);
    }
}

If your Context is loading configurations manually you need to add the new ComplexMap, if your using the FromAssembly overload it'll be picked up with the rest of the configuration objects.

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2

On EF6 you can configure the complex type:

 modelBuilder.Types<AddressDetails>()
     .Configure(c => c.Ignore(p => p.Country))

That way the property Country will be always ignored.

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1

Try this

modelBuilder.ComplexType<AddressDetails>().Ignore(p => p.Country);

It worked for me in similar case.

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-2

It can be done in Fluent API as well, just add in the mapping the following code

this.Ignore(t => t.Country), tested in EF6

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  • 2
    The question is about ignoring a property on a complex type. The precise scenario that won't work under EF6. – Søren Boisen Apr 29 '15 at 18:39

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