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I have a question regarding title tags. I have been using them on every link on my site in the hope that it will be good for SEO. Because I have so many title tags in use it looks very crazy to actually visit. No matter where you point there's another title popup. Is there any way to prevent these hovers (the ones that show the content of the title tag) while still using title tags?

Thank you for your answers.

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    I think you mean title attributes. – Andy Ford Oct 4 '09 at 1:07
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  1. Quit overobsessing about "SEO".
  2. The title tag is for information about the link (target). If you use it for keyword lists or something like that, then stop. If you simply duplicate the link text, there's no need. If you use it correctly, you shouldn't worry about the tooltip that browsers display.
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    I agree in principle with what everyone is saying about this issue.... HOWEVER, I have a client who is ADAMANT, INSISTANT, and CONVINCED that this technique be must be used to-the-max. So, my job as a good designer is to find a way to make his SEO-fetish happy while not hindering the visitors.... It is not whether we agree it is bad or not, but to get the job done. I would love it if I only had to do projects that I felt were worthy of doing, instead of trying to make a living. :O – exoboy Jul 20 '10 at 19:59
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You could use JavaScript to remove the title attribute (not tag).

But as the others said, the title attribute is intended to provide “advisory information about the element for which it is set”. So don’t spam the user with useless information just because you heard/read that search engines love that.

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The best "rule of thumb" I have heard and experienced in a positive way with SEO is to make a great site for your visitor and let the search engines take care of themselves. It sounds like you are making a site for Google and making the visitor miserable which is the exact opposite of successful SEO.

Remember, without the visitor it doesn't matter what your SE placement is.

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  • This advice seems common-sense and follows Google's official line but is debunked by SEO experts. Saying that good SEO and miserable user experience is bad is true but totally not useful. Conversely a wonderful site for visitors which nobody can find represents a lot of wasted resources. SEO is very important in the current context. Dismissing is not a good advice in any way. – allesklar Oct 4 '09 at 6:50
  • The only Google experts (employees) aren't talking. I'm not saying there is nothing to do in SEO or that it is useless, but if you have so many popups that you are looking for ways in CSS to neutralize them then you need some centering. It's not "totally not useful" in the OPs case. I said it was the best "rule of thumb" and not the only one. A "wonderful site for visitors" will be found by many because others will link to it, boosting SE cred, etc. I am not going based on common sense or Google, but rather on personal experience and the advice of many successful SEO professionals. – Deverill Oct 4 '09 at 19:32
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I fully agree wuth Joel (+1), imho now you achieve reverse effect: your site looks like one big fake to google without real content :)

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<a onMouseOver="javascript: this.title='';" href="../path/to/image.jpg" title="some title here">link</a>

I agree with others though, you should not sacrifice usability, integrity of content and the site's design in order to achieve better SE ranking.

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  • True but there are ways to shine on both fronts. – allesklar Oct 4 '09 at 6:51
  • If you are shining on both fronts then you aren't sacrificing usability etc etc :) – Quentin Oct 4 '09 at 7:39
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As Andy (and others) note, you may be confusing the Page Title tag with the Link title attribute.

To clarify, in terms of SEO:

  • Page Title tags on pages ARE very important for SEO
  • Link title attributes are very minor and not worth upsetting user experience with.
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I have not tried this myself, and I am not sure how Google feels about it:

But what about putting all your title tags where you want them, for the SEO, then after the onload event is fired, simply null them all at once by finding all elements that have the title attribute and setting them to "". This way, the user is not beaten-to-death by title tags as they try to stumble their way through your page....?

In Prototype, I use the $$() function to get all items of a specific class and it works like a champ.

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