36

I'm working on sorting an integer sequence with no identical numbers (without loss of generality, let's assume the sequence is a permutation of 1,2,...,n) into its natural increasing order (i.e. 1,2,...,n). I was thinking about directly swapping the elements (regardless of the positions of elements; in other words, a swap is valid for any two elements) with minimal number of swaps (the following may be a feasible solution):

Swap two elements with the constraint that either one or both of them should be swapped into the correct position(s). Until every element is put in its correct position.

But I don't know how to mathematically prove if the above solution is optimal. Anyone can help?

13 Answers 13

57

I was able to prove this with . Might want to add that tag in :)

Create a graph with n vertices. Create an edge from node n_i to n_j if the element in position i should be in position j in the correct ordering. You will now have a graph consisting of several non-intersecting cycles. I argue that the minimum number of swaps needed to order the graph correctly is

M = sum (c in cycles) size(c) - 1

Take a second to convince yourself of that...if two items are in a cycle, one swap can just take care of them. If three items are in a cycle, you can swap a pair to put one in the right spot, and a two-cycle remains, etc. If n items are in a cycle, you need n-1 swaps. (This is always true even if you don't swap with immediate neighbors.)

Given that, you may now be able to see why your algorithm is optimal. If you do a swap and at least one item is in the right position, then it will always reduce the value of M by 1. For any cycle of length n, consider swapping an element into the correct spot, occupied by its neighbor. You now have a correctly ordered element, and a cycle of length n-1.

Since M is the minimum number of swaps, and your algorithm always reduces M by 1 for each swap, it must be optimal.

  • 1
    what will be time complexity of this? – puneet Jan 30 '17 at 16:26
  • 2
    Time complexity : O(n*logn) Space complexity : O(n) @puneet – Rewanth Cool Feb 20 '17 at 17:20
  • But how is that a proof of minimality? "I argue that the minimum number of swaps...", "Take a second to convince yourself of that..." Sorry, "arguing" and "convincing yourself" is not enough. You have to actually prove that the above M is minimal. – AnT Aug 26 '18 at 16:09
  • @AnT, I agree. Specifically, I can conceive of an algorithm that involves swaps where neither item ends it's intended positions, but achieves the same number of moves. Specifically, one can make swaps to reduce any cycle to a number of two cycles (possibly ending with a single one cycle if n is odd), and then swap all of the two cycles into the correct positions. This also involves n-1 moves. Although this is not faster than the algorithm provided, it at least shows that the optimality of the provided algorithm is far from obvious. – Scott Sep 26 '18 at 17:04
  • @AnT Minimality comes from the fact that any n-element cycle is minimally the product of n-1 transpositions – arax Apr 22 at 23:57
9

Ehm, all the cycle counting is very difficult to keep in your head. There is a way that is much simpler to memorize.

First, lets go throw a sample case manually.

  • Sequence: [7, 1, 3, 2, 4, 5, 6]
  • Enumerate it: [(0, 7), (1, 1), (2, 3), (3, 2), (4, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6)]
  • Sort the enumeration by value: [(1, 1), (3, 2), (2, 3), (4, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6), (0, 7)]
  • Start from the beginning. While the index is different from the enumerated index keep on swapping the elements defined by index and enumerated index. Remember: swap(0,2);swap(0,3) is the same as swap(2,3);swap(0,2)
    • swap(0, 1) => [(3, 2), (1, 1), (2, 3), (4, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6), (0, 7)]
    • swap(0, 3) => [(4, 4), (1, 1), (2, 3), (3, 2), (5, 5), (6, 6), (0, 7)]
    • swap(0, 4) => [(5, 5), (1, 1), (2, 3), (3, 2), (4, 4), (6, 6), (0, 7)]
    • swap(0, 5) => [(6, 6), (1, 1), (2, 3), (3, 2), (4, 4), (5, 5), (0, 7)]
    • swap(0, 6) => [(0, 7), (1, 1), (2, 3), (3, 2), (4, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6)]

I.e. semantically you sort the elements and then figure out how to put them to the initial state via swapping through the leftmost item that is out of place.

Python algorithm is as simple as this:

def swap(arr, i, j):
    tmp = arr[i]
    arr[i] = arr[j]
    arr[j] = tmp


def minimum_swaps(arr):
    annotated = [*enumerate(arr)]
    annotated.sort(key = lambda it: it[1])

    count = 0

    i = 0
    while i < len(arr):
        if annotated[i][0] == i:
            i += 1
            continue
        swap(annotated, i, annotated[i][0])
        count += 1

    return count

Thus you don't need to memorize visited nodes nor compute some cycle length.

7

For your reference, here is an algorithm that I wrote, to generate the minimum number of swaps needed to sort the array. It finds the cycles as described by @Andrew Mao.

/**
 * Finds the minimum number of swaps to sort given array in increasing order.
 * @param ar array of <strong>non-negative distinct</strong> integers. 
 *           input array will be overwritten during the call!
 * @return min no of swaps
 */
public int findMinSwapsToSort(int[] ar) {
    int n = ar.length;
    Map<Integer, Integer> m = new HashMap<>();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        m.put(ar[i], i);
    }
    Arrays.sort(ar);
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        ar[i] = m.get(ar[i]);
    }
    m = null;
    int swaps = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int val = ar[i];
        if (val < 0) continue;
        while (val != i) {
            int new_val = ar[val];
            ar[val] = -1;
            val = new_val;
            swaps++;
        }
        ar[i] = -1;
    }
    return swaps;
}
  • Can you explain what is happening in last while loop – GURMEET SINGH Aug 17 '18 at 9:26
  • Can anyone help with understanding the code? I can't seem to grasp the logic behind what is happening – Spindoctor Aug 27 '18 at 17:51
  • @GURMEETSINGH did you figure out the algorithm? – Spindoctor Aug 27 '18 at 18:55
  • @Spindoctor yes I figured it out – GURMEET SINGH Aug 27 '18 at 19:44
  • 1
    @Spindoctor in first for loop it is keeping the actual value as key and the position in the original array as value. Then the array is sorted using Collections.sort(). in second for loop we are getting index of array prior to sorting. in the last for loop we are making elements of cycle as -1 – GURMEET SINGH Aug 27 '18 at 19:50
3

We do not need to swap the actual elements, just find how many elements are not in the right index (Cycle). The min swaps will be Cycle - 1; Here is the code...

static int minimumSwaps(int[] arr) {
        int swap=0;
        boolean visited[]=new boolean[arr.length];

        for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
            int j=i,cycle=0;

            while(!visited[j]){
                visited[j]=true;
                j=arr[j]-1;
                cycle++;
            }

            if(cycle!=0)
                swap+=cycle-1;
        }
        return swap;


    }
  • I am not able to relate how the while loops works to find the number of cycles. Specifically, the 2nd statement in the while loop. j=arr[j]-1; Why the value of j getting derived by subtracting 1 whereas we are setting it to i at the start. – Ashish Santikari Aug 23 at 6:22
2

Swift 4 version:

func minimumSwaps(arr: [Int]) -> Int {

      struct Pair {
         let index: Int
         let value: Int
      }

      var positions = arr.enumerated().map { Pair(index: $0, value: $1) }
      positions.sort { $0.value < $1.value }
      var indexes = positions.map { $0.index }

      var swaps = 0
      for i in 0 ..< indexes.count {
         var val = indexes[i]
         if val < 0 {
            continue // Already visited.
         }
         while val != i {
            let new_val = indexes[val]
            indexes[val] = -1
            val = new_val
            swaps += 1
         }
         indexes[i] = -1
      }
      return swaps
}
2

// Assuming that we are dealing with only sequence started with zero

function minimumSwaps(arr) {
    var len = arr.length
    var visitedarr = []
    var i, start, j, swap = 0
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if (!visitedarr[i]) {
            start = j = i
            var cycleNode = 1
            while (arr[j] != start) {
                j = arr[j]
                visitedarr[j] = true
                cycleNode++
            }
            swap += cycleNode - 1
        }
    }
    return swap
}
1

Nicely done solution by @bekce. If using C#, the initial code of setting up the modified array ar can be succinctly expressed as:

var origIndexes = Enumerable.Range(0, n).ToArray();
Array.Sort(ar, origIndexes);

then use origIndexes instead of ar in the rest of the code.

1

In Javascript

If the count of the array starts with 1

function minimumSwaps(arr) {
   var len = arr.length
    var visitedarr = []
    var i, start, j, swap = 0
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if (!visitedarr[i]) {
            start = j = i
            var cycleNode = 1
            while (arr[j] != start + 1) {
                j = arr[j] - 1
                visitedarr[j] = true
                cycleNode++
            }
            swap += cycleNode - 1
        }
    }
    return swap
}

else for input starting with 0

function minimumSwaps(arr) {
    var len = arr.length
    var visitedarr = []
    var i, start, j, swap = 0
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if (!visitedarr[i]) {
            start = j = i
            var cycleNode = 1
            while (arr[j] != start) {
                j = arr[j]
                visitedarr[j] = true
                cycleNode++
            }
            swap += cycleNode - 1
        }
    }
    return swap
}

Just extending Darshan Puttaswamy code for current HackerEarth inputs

0

This is the sample code in C++ that finds the minimum number of swaps to sort a permutation of the sequence of (1,2,3,4,5,.......n-2,n-1,n)

#include<bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;


int main()
{
    int n,i,j,k,num = 0;
    cin >> n;
    int arr[n+1];
    for(i = 1;i <= n;++i)cin >> arr[i];
    for(i = 1;i <= n;++i)
    {
        if(i != arr[i])// condition to check if an element is in a cycle r nt
        {
            j = arr[i];
            arr[i] = 0;
            while(j != 0)// Here i am traversing a cycle as mentioned in 
            {             // first answer
                k = arr[j];
                arr[j] = j;
                j = k;
                num++;// reducing cycle by one node each time
            }
            num--;
        }
    }
    for(i = 1;i <= n;++i)cout << arr[i] << " ";cout << endl;
    cout << num << endl;
    return 0;
}
0

An implementation on integers with primitive types in Java (and tests).

import java.util.Arrays;

public class MinSwaps {
  public static int computate(int[] unordered) {
    int size = unordered.length;
    int[] ordered = order(unordered);
    int[] realPositions = realPositions(ordered, unordered);
    boolean[] touchs = new boolean[size];
    Arrays.fill(touchs, false);
    int i;
    int landing;
    int swaps = 0;

    for(i = 0; i < size; i++) {
      if(!touchs[i]) {
        landing = realPositions[i];

        while(!touchs[landing]) {
          touchs[landing] = true;
          landing = realPositions[landing];

          if(!touchs[landing]) { swaps++; }
        }
      }
    }

    return swaps;
  }

  private static int[] realPositions(int[] ordered, int[] unordered) {
    int i;
    int[] positions = new int[unordered.length];

    for(i = 0; i < unordered.length; i++) {
      positions[i] = position(ordered, unordered[i]);
    }

    return positions;
  }

  private static int position(int[] ordered, int value) {
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < ordered.length; i++) {
      if(ordered[i] == value) {
        return i;
      }
    }

    return -1;
  }

  private static int[] order(int[] unordered) {
    int[] ordered = unordered.clone();
    Arrays.sort(ordered);

    return ordered;
  }
}

Tests

import org.junit.Test;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

public class MinimumSwapsSpec {
  @Test
  public void example() {
    // setup
    int[] unordered = new int[] { 40, 23, 1, 7, 52, 31 };

    // run
    int minSwaps = MinSwaps.computate(unordered);

    // verify
    assertEquals(5, minSwaps);
  }

  @Test
  public void example2() {
    // setup
    int[] unordered = new int[] { 4, 3, 2, 1 };

    // run
    int minSwaps = MinSwaps.computate(unordered);

    // verify
    assertEquals(2, minSwaps);
  }

  @Test
  public void example3() {
    // setup
    int[] unordered = new int[] {1, 5, 4, 3, 2};

    // run
    int minSwaps = MinSwaps.computate(unordered);

    // verify
    assertEquals(2, minSwaps);
  }
}
0

Swift 4.2:

func minimumSwaps(arr: [Int]) -> Int {
    let sortedValueIdx = arr.sorted().enumerated()
        .reduce(into: [Int: Int](), { $0[$1.element] = $1.offset })

    var checked = Array(repeating: false, count: arr.count)
    var swaps = 0

    for idx in 0 ..< arr.count {
        if checked[idx] { continue }

        var edges = 1
        var cursorIdx = idx
        while true {
            let cursorEl = arr[cursorIdx]
            let targetIdx = sortedValueIdx[cursorEl]!
            if targetIdx == idx {
                break
            } else {
                cursorIdx = targetIdx
                edges += 1
            }
            checked[targetIdx] = true
        }
        swaps += edges - 1
    }

    return swaps
}
0

Python code

A = [4,3,2,1]
count = 0
for i in range (len(A)):
    min_idx = i
    for j in range (i+1,len(A)):
        if A[min_idx] > A[j]:
            min_idx = j
    if min_idx > i:
        A[i],A[min_idx] = A[min_idx],A[i]
        count = count + 1
print "Swap required : %d" %count
0

@Archibald, I like your solution, and such was my initial assumptions that sorting the array would be the simplest solution, but I don't see the need to go through the effort of the reverse-traverse as I've dubbed it, ie enumerating then sorting the array and then computing the swaps for the enums.

I find it simpler to subtract 1 from each element in the array and then to compute the swaps required to sort that list

here is my tweak/solution:

def swap(arr, i, j):
    tmp = arr[i]
    arr[i] = arr[j]
    arr[j] = tmp

def minimum_swaps(arr):

    a = [x - 1 for x in arr]

    swaps = 0
    i = 0
    while i < len(a):
        if a[i] == i:
            i += 1
            continue
        swap(a, i, a[i])
        swaps += 1

    return swaps

As for proving optimality, I think @arax has a good point.

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