0

Consider this:

for (int iii=0; iii < 10; iii++)
    cout << iii << " ";

Why doesn't iii lose it's value after the first for iteration?

6
  • 2
    Do you mean the first for-statement or the first pass of that for-loop?
    – Gjordis
    Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 8:25
  • lose value where? and what do mean by after the first for ?
    – Freak
    Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 8:25
  • why would it lose it? Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 8:26
  • 1
    I mean for the first iteration. You can't use the variable after this for, but it keeps it's value through the whole for. I mean the program prints 0,1,2... and not 0,0,0,0 which would do if iii would be initialized at each for step Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 8:29
  • 3
    Because it is defined that way so that people can write for-loops that actually loop correctly. Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 8:30

3 Answers 3

3

Because the following for

for (initialization ; condition ; increment)
{
    body;
}

is equivalent to the following while

{
    initialization;
    while (condition)
    {
        body;
        increment;
    }
}
1
  • yes this is the answer I was looking for. Although you can't see that the initialization is done like that when looking at the for. Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 8:32
3

Because scope of variables defined in for loop is body of that for statement.

In your case, iii is visible inside for loop, but not outside of it.

1
  • So it's something like {int i; for(i=0;...)} ? Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 8:26
3

Because this is equivalent to:

{
    int iii = 0;
    while(iii < 10){
        cout << iii << " ";
        iii++;
    }
}

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