13

This is an interview question. Count all numbers with unique digits (in decimal) in the range [1, N].

The obvious solution is to test each number in the range if its digits are unique. We can also generate all numbers with unique digits (as permutations) and test if they are in the range.

Now I wonder if there is a DP (dynamic programming) solution for this problem.

  • For future reference, sounds like it may fit better on CodeGolf. – Bernhard Barker Mar 1 '13 at 11:17
  • You are supposed to count them, not generate them. – n. 'pronouns' m. Mar 1 '13 at 11:24
  • btw, a formula for max distinct-digit numbers, given an n-digit number a(n) = 9*9!/(10-n)! is available here: oeis.org/A073531 – user978923 Mar 1 '13 at 22:19
14
0

I'm thinking:

Number of unique digits numbers 1-5324
=   Number of unique digits numbers 1-9
  + Number of unique digits numbers 10-99
  + Number of unique digits numbers 100-999
  + Number of unique digits numbers 1000-5324

So:

f(n) = Number of unique digits numbers with length n.
f(1) = 9 (1-9)
f(2) = 9*9 (1-9 * 0-9 (excluding first digit))
f(3) = 9*9*8 (1-9 * 0-9 (excluding first digit) * 0-9 (excluding first 2 digits))
f(4) = 9*9*8*7

Add all of the above until you get to the number of digits that N has minus 1.

Then you only have to do Number of unique digits numbers 1000-5324

And:

Number of unique digits numbers 1000-5324
=   Number of unique digits numbers 1000-4999
  + Number of unique digits numbers 5000-5299
  + Number of unique digits numbers 5300-5319
  + Number of unique digits numbers 5320-5324

So:

N = 5324

If N[0] = 1, there are 9*8*7 possibilities for the other digits
If N[0] = 2, there are 9*8*7 possibilities for the other digits
If N[0] = 3, there are 9*8*7 possibilities for the other digits
If N[0] = 4, there are 9*8*7 possibilities for the other digits
If N[0] = 5
  If N[1] = 0, there are 8*7 possibilities for the other digits
  If N[1] = 1, there are 8*7 possibilities for the other digits
  If N[1] = 2, there are 8*7 possibilities for the other digits
  If N[1] = 3
    If N[2] = 0, there are 7 possibilities for the other digits
    If N[2] = 1, there are 7 possibilities for the other digits
    If N[2] = 2
      If N[3] = 0, there is 1 possibility (no other digits)
      If N[3] = 1, there is 1 possibility (no other digits)
      If N[3] = 2, there is 1 possibility (no other digits)
      If N[3] = 3, there is 1 possibility (no other digits)

The above is something like:

uniques += (N[0]-1)*9!/(9-N.length+1)!
for (int i = 1:N.length)
  uniques += N[i]*(9-i)!/(9-N.length+1)!

// don't forget N
if (hasUniqueDigits(N))
  uniques += 1

You don't really need DP as the above should be fast enough.

EDIT:

The above actually needs to be a little more complicated (N[2] = 2 and N[3] = 2 above is not valid). It needs to be more like:

binary used[10]
uniques += (N[0]-1)*9!/(9-N.length+1)!
used[N[0]] = 1
for (int i = 1:N.length)
  uniques += (N[i]-sum(used 0 to N[i]))*(9-i)!/(9-N.length+1)!
  if (used[N[i]] == 1)
    break
  used[N[i]] = 1

// still need to remember N
if (hasUniqueDigits(N))
  uniques += 1
| improve this answer | |
  • I think you may have meant ".../(9-N.length+1)!", i.e., +1 rather than -1 at the end of the factorial expressions. 9! / 6! = 9*8*7, but 9!/4! = 9*8*7*6*5. I can get the formula to work for 30 (28), but not for 100 (output is 91, should be 90) – user978923 Mar 1 '13 at 21:56
  • @alhambra For 99 or 100, did you add 1 at the end? For these you shouldn't since they don't have unique digits. Edited answer. – Bernhard Barker Mar 1 '13 at 22:20
  • @Dukeling Thanks for clarifying that...The edited formula works, very nice! – user978923 Mar 1 '13 at 22:54
1
0

Lazy man's DP:

Prelude> :m +Data.List
Data.List> length [a | a <- [1..5324], length (show a) == length (nub $ show a)]
2939
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Gibberish to anyone who doesn't understand whatever language that is. This wasn't a specific language question. – Bernhard Barker Mar 1 '13 at 12:11
  • It is pretty obvious it is Haskell. I am Ok with it. – Michael Mar 1 '13 at 12:38
1
0

Although this question had been posted in 2013, I feel like it is still worthy to provide an implementation for reference as other than the algorithm given by Dukeling I couldn't find any implementation on the internet.

I wrote the code in Java for both brute force and Dukeling's permutation algorithm and, if I'm correct, they should always yield the same results.

Hope it can help somebody trying so hard to find an actual running solution.

public class Solution { 

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        test(uniqueDigitsBruteForce(5324), uniqueDigits(5324));
        test(uniqueDigitsBruteForce(5222), uniqueDigits(5222));
        test(uniqueDigitsBruteForce(5565), uniqueDigits(5565));
    }

     /**
     * A math version method to count numbers with distinct digits.
     * @param n
     * @return
     */
    static int uniqueDigits(int n) {
        int[] used = new int[10];
        String seq = String.valueOf(n);
        char[] ca = seq.toCharArray();
        int uniq = 0;

        for (int i = 1; i <= ca.length - 1; i++) {
            uniq += uniqueDigitsOfLength(i);
        }

        uniq += (getInt(ca[0]) - 1) * factorial(9) / factorial(9 - ca.length + 1);
        used[getInt(ca[0])] = 1;
        for (int i = 1; i < ca.length; i++) {
            int count = 0;
            for (int j = 0; j < getInt(ca[i]); j++) {
                if (used[j] != 1) count++;
            }
            uniq += count * factorial(9 - i) / factorial(9 - ca.length + 1);
            if (used[getInt(ca[i])] == 1)
                break;
            used[getInt(ca[i])] = 1;
        }

        if (isUniqueDigits(n)) {
            uniq += 1;
        }
        return uniq;
    }


    /**
     * A brute force version method to count numbers with distinct digits.
     * @param n
     * @return
     */
    static int uniqueDigitsBruteForce(int n) {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
            if (isUniqueDigits(i)) {
                count++;
            }
        }
        return count;
    }



    /**
     * http://oeis.org/A073531
     * @param n
     * @return
     */
    static int uniqueDigitsOfLength(int n) {
        if (n < 1) return 0;
        int count = 9;
        int numOptions = 9;
        while(--n > 0) {
            if (numOptions == 0) {
                return 0;
            }
            count *= numOptions;
            numOptions--;
        }
        return count;
    }

    /**
     * Determine if given number consists of distinct digits
     * @param n
     * @return
     */
    static boolean isUniqueDigits(int n) {
        int[] used = new int[10];
        if (n < 10) return true;
        while (n > 0) {
            int digit = n % 10;
            if (used[digit] == 1)
                return false;
            used[digit] = 1;
            n = n / 10;
        }
        return true;
    }

    static int getInt(char c) {
        return c - '0';
    }

    /**
     * Calculate Factorial
     * @param n
     * @return
     */
    static int factorial(int n) {
        if (n > 9) return -1;
        if (n < 2) return 1;
        int res = 1;            
        for (int i = 2; i <= n; i++) {
            res *= i;
        }
        return res;
    }

    static void test(int expected, int actual) {
        System.out.println("Expected Result: " + expected.toString());
        System.out.println("Actual Result: " + actual.toString());
        System.out.println(expected.equals(actual) ? "Correct" : "Wrong Answer");
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

For an interview question like this, a brute-force algorithm is probably intended, to demonstrate logic and programming competency. But also important is demonstrating knowledge of a good tool for the job.

Sure, after lots of time spent on the calculation, you can come up with a convoluted mathematical formula to shorten a looping algorithm. But this question is a straightforward example of pattern-matching, so why not use the pattern-matching tool built in to just about any language you'll be using: regular expressions?

Here's an extremely simple solution in C# as an example:

string csv = string.Join(",", Enumerable.Range(1, N));
int numUnique = N - Regex.Matches(csv, @"(\d)\d*\1").Count;

Line 1 will differ depending on the language you use, but it's just creating a CSV of all the integers from 1 to N.

But Line 2 would be very similar no matter what language: count how many times the pattern matches in the csv.

The regex pattern matches a digit possibly followed by some other digits, followed by a duplicate of the first digit.

| improve this answer | |
0
0
import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
import java.math.*;
import java.util.regex.*;

public class Solution { 
 public static void main(String[] args) {

         int rem;
        Scanner in=new Scanner(System.in);
         int num=in.nextInt();
    int length = (int)(Math.log10(num)+1);//This one is to find the length of the number i.e number of digits of a number


    int arr[]=new int[length]; //Array to store the individual numbers of a digit for example 123 then we will store 1,2,3 in the array

    int count=0;
     int i=0;

     while(num>0)           //Logic to store the digits in array
    { rem=num%10;   
        arr[i++]=rem;
        num=num/10; 
    }     
    for( i=0;i<length;i++)          //Logic to find the duplicate numbers
    {
        for(int j=i+1;j<length;j++)
        {
            if(arr[i]==arr[j])
            {
                count++;
                 break;
            }
        }
    }
     //Finally total number of digits minus duplicates gives the output
     System.out.println(length-count);
   }
}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.