3

C# allows to assign any integer value to enum.

When I try to serialize (via protobuf-net) object with enum field which value is out of range, it throws exception: No wire-value is mapped to the enum PersonLevel.

My enum PersonLevel doesn't have Flags attribute.

[ProtoContract(ImplicitFields = ImplicitFields.AllFields)]
public enum PersonLevel
{
  Unknown = 1
}

[ProtoContract(ImplicitFields = ImplicitFields.AllFields)]
public class Person
{
  ...

  public PersonLevel PersonLevel { get; set; }

  ...
}
var ms = new MemoryStream();

var person = new Person
{
  ...
  PersonLevel = (PersonLevel) 500
  ...
};

Serializer.Serialize(ms, person); //No wire-value is mapped to the enum PersonLevel

Is there any facilities to do it without changing business objects (maybe any protobuf attrubutes)?

6

There are a couple of ways of telling it to simplify the rules; as Ravadre notes, [Flags] automatically disables validation - it causes EnumPassthru to become toggled. You can also do this manually - as long as it is before you start serializing / deserializing:

RuntimeTypeModel.Default[typeof(PersonLevel)].EnumPassthru = true;

which has the description:

/// <summary>
/// Gets or sets a value indicating that an enum should be treated directly as an int/short/etc, rather
/// than enforcing .proto enum rules. This is useful *in particular* for [Flags] enums.
/// </summary>
2

What you can do is create an int field which you will pack into protobuf message and expose a Property, which will expose your int field as an enum of your type (being a wrapper).

This might be harder if you are using implicit fields, because probably protobuf will try to serialize both, your integer and your enum property. You can try to explicitly [ProtoIgnore] your enum property.

However, protobuf does this automatically for you if your enum is marked with [Flags] attribute, so changing your enum to:

[ProtoContract(ImplicitFields = ImplicitFields.AllFields)]
[Flags]
public enum PersonLevel
{
    Unknown = 1
}

should make it work. At least in version 2.

2
  • @marcin-deputala You should be careful with using an enum value like unkown. If you use it on more than one enum and use two or more of those enums on the same class you will see an error like this one: MyClass.proto:67:4: "Unknown" is already defined. MyClass.proto:67:4: Note that enum values use C++ scoping rules, meaning that enum values are siblings of their type, not children of it. Therefore, "Unknown" must be unique within the global scope, not just within "PersonLevel". I am currently trying to figure out how this can for a large legacy code base that uses that pattern extensively.
    – Jay Pete
    Jul 28 '17 at 10:15
  • Perhaps you can tell protobuf-net to treat enums as strings? @marc-gravell would probably know that... or be able to suggest another solution.
    – Jay Pete
    Jul 28 '17 at 10:17

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