39

What does this mean?

My function gets two numpy arrays from a python/c library. After that function call I turn on the debugger to find a bug, so I add the line to look at the two numpy arrays.

    import pdb; pdb.set_trace()

But for the values of one of the arrays pdb only returns the message *** Newest frame

PDB output:

(Pdb) type(d)
<type 'numpy.ndarray'>
(Pdb) type(f)
<type 'numpy.ndarray'>
(Pdb) f.shape
(3, 3, 17856)
(Pdb) d[0].shape
*** Newest frame
(Pdb) d[0]
*** Newest frame

1 Answer 1

63

The command d is the command for the debugger used to go down the stack to a 'newer frame'. It seems that the parsing cannot not handle this disambiguity.

Try renaming the variable d.

EDIT: Actually, the comments suggest much better handling than renaming.

3
  • 9
    or do p d[0].shape or print d[0].shape Mar 1, 2013 at 15:52
  • 10
    Or use an exclamation mark if you want to use Python code in the debugger: !d[0]. Normally, anything you enter on the debugger cmdline is consider a debugger command, not Python (but the debugger is quite flexible). See near the end of the documentation.
    – user707650
    Mar 1, 2013 at 16:15
  • 4
    The (unfortunately deleted) answer by Alex E has a very good suggestion for a workaround - simply type print(d) in the debugger. This answer would be stronger if it added that suggestion.
    – Floris
    Mar 23, 2020 at 21:04

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